The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: NKM
About
User Name: NKM
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Retired computer programmer; musician
Interests: Language in general, English in particular
Gender: Male
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Saturday, February 14, 2015
Last Visit: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 4:35:37 PM
Number of Posts: 4,485
[0.51% of all post / 3.75 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Has been shown to be
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 4:35:36 PM
Don't try to separately analyze "has been" and "to be". 

Rather, consider the whole phrase "has been shown to be" as a passive substitute for the active form "[tests] have shown [that] … is".



 ∙ Iron isomaltoside is an intravenous iron preparation for the treatment of anaemia.
 ∙ It has been shown to be non-inferior to intravenous iron sucrose in a randomised controlled trial.


Thus: "A randomised controlled trial has shown that iron isomaltoside is non-inferior to intravenous iron sucrose."
   = "Iron isomaltoside has been shown to be non-inferior to IV iron sucrose in a randomised controlled trial."


Topic: Is "the" needed?
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 3:37:26 PM
It reads better without the "the", but I wouldn't insist on removing it.

It had not occurred to me until Ashwin mentioned it, but if polygyny is to be considered then the article might be meaningful. Saying "the wife" would suggest that she is his only wife; "a wife" would imply that she is not the only one, whereas omitting the article would allow for either situation.

Topic: Should "imprisonment" be replaced by "prison"?
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:40:12 PM
A couple of suggestions:

One wonders if the agenda has ever been clearly defined or if it simply takes on the flavour of its time, bending to the need of whoever is wielding it.

Topic: "It's more cozy for you."
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:29:46 PM
AndEng wrote:

As to the question, it is not grammatical as it is, unless you did it deliberately to indicate that your son is still small and cannot speak correctly. Otherwise I would rephrase it at least as "Why putting on the pillowcase?"

══════════════════════════════════════════════

No! "Why put on the pillowcase?" is perfectly natural and grammatical. It's a standard short form of ""Why [do/would/should you] put on the pillowcase"?

"Why putting on …" is ungrammatical.

Topic: Is the comma needed?
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:23:55 AM
ChrisKC wrote:
Not sure if I am right, but shouldn't the "king" be capitalised? "King"



In general, words like "king", "queen", "president", "senator" are treated as common nouns. We capitalize them only when they are used as formal titles, as in "King George" or "Queen Elizabeth".

(Local/regional customs may vary.)

Topic: Is the comma needed?
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:26:22 AM
I suppose it's not required grammatically, but it certainly contributes to clarity.

Topic: driving down the street
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:24:22 AM
Without the commas, they don't really make sense at all. With the commas, they are at best ambiguous and confusing.

b. They injured him, sitting behind the wheel of his car.
 How many of them were sitting behind the wheel of his car?

d. They shot her in the shoulder, driving down the street she lived on.
 Where was she while they were driving down the street and shooting her?

f. I talked to her, driving down the street she lived on.
 Was she at home while I was driving down the street and talking to her?

Topic: It had been vs it has been
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:03:30 AM
I vote for the misprint theory.

Topic: Grammar doubts
Posted: Sunday, May 20, 2018 6:03:05 PM
"I will bathe the starways in your blood."
"I will smear the starways with your blood."  (Which preposition is more appropriate depends on what action is implied by the verb.)

"I don't mind your saying so." — I prefer "your", because I'm old and I like the old rule.

"This doesn't sound right to my ear." — "Fine" isn't the right word here, and "to" is better than "for".

"I don't care how much money I have to spend." — "I've gotta" is very informal; "I've got to" would be better, but "I have to" sounds much better to me.

Topic: Grammar
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 6:33:18 PM
A young woman, Thulasi, has been married to the love of her life, Krishna. Although the couple is are compatible and loves love each other wholeheartedly, they are not completely at peace. Why?

Note 1: The name of the young woman needs commas to set it apart as an appositive. (Alternatively, it could be written as "a young woman named Thulasi".)

Note 2: The phrase "each other" calls for a plural verb, so I've changed "is" to "are" and "loves" to "love. ("… are compatible and love each other …")

Some Americans might not be comfortable with "the couple are"; you might consider changing "the couple" to "the two of them" or simply "they".
  A young woman, Thulasi, has been married to the love of her life, Krishna. Although the two of them are compatible and love each other wholeheartedly, they are not completely at peace. Why?

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.