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Profile: NKM
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User Name: NKM
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, February 14, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, May 4, 2020 10:35:24 PM
Number of Posts: 5,266
[0.53% of all post / 2.66 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: manner
Posted: Saturday, April 18, 2020 6:04:41 PM
Better, I think, would be "An unseemly/undignified behavior."

(On second thought, better yet without the indefinite article.)

Topic: way
Posted: Saturday, April 18, 2020 5:58:10 PM
I'd prefer simply: "They led a nomadic life."

Topic: The
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 5:37:28 PM
Both are correct, and probably about equally common.

And both have the same meaning.
Topic: And as the slam big city goes rocketing by
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 5:32:32 PM
So do I!
Topic: Can could must
Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 4:16:26 PM
Atatürk wrote:
He can't/mustn't/couldn't have done that.


What's the difference in meaning?

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Basically, they're the same: "It can't be that he did that."  Usually this indicates incredulity: "I can't believe he did that!"

Note, however, that American English doesn't normally use the contraction "mustn't" that way. We say "He must not have done that" to mean that it couldn't have happened that way — there must be some other explanation.

("He mustn't do that" means that it would be extremely unwise or inadvisable for him to do it.)

Topic: Do these sound fine?
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2020 4:24:11 PM
"I'd like" is a lot more polite than "I want".

Topic: idioms based on comparisons to animals
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2020 3:21:31 PM
Those idioms about "busy" bes and beavers (and "hungry as a horse") are popular because of alliteration.

"Eager beaver" has none of that, but it rhymes rather nicely.

Topic: loud or high
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2020 2:54:36 PM
"Loud volume" seems redundant; if something is played at high volume, it is loud.

Topic: [he always wanted] or [he always wants]
Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 5:45:27 PM
Seems to me it should be:

Last year, Jack was promoted to senior manager. That was one of the many dreams he had always wanted to fulfill.
Topic: a fraction/a tiny bit
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 3:32:04 PM
(Actually, that's not what you asked, but I'll answer this new question anyway.)

"A bit of" anything may be "a small amount" of it -- not necessarily a single piece.

A piece of meat can be a large chunk, not just "a bit".