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Profile: NKM
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User Name: NKM
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Retired computer programmer; musician
Interests: Language in general, English in particular
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, February 14, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, March 18, 2019 2:14:13 PM
Number of Posts: 5,083
[0.55% of all post / 3.40 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Veto the clown!
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 2:14:13 PM
It's high time for those hyper-partisan "Republicans" to wake up and override Trump's veto power — UNANIMOUSLY.

I think most of us real Repulbicans have enough common sense to see that he's running for a promotion from President to Dictator.

Topic: are/is
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 1:52:58 PM
Not ungrammatical, assuming that it fits the context of the conversation.

It's prefectly normal to speak of a "three-day trip", for example.

Topic: for
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 1:46:08 PM
I don't know whether San Diego is noted for its beaches, but in this context that seems to be the implication.

To "go straight on" (or "straight through") is to "go through without stopping".

Topic: very real?
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 1:37:35 PM
Psychosomatic symptoms do exist, and being told "It's all in your head" doesn't make them any less real.

Topic: A romcom about...
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 2:08:17 PM
Unlike Sarrriesfan, I don't see any need for sources in this kind of thread.

To answer the question, I can only recommend adding a comma before "in her ambition …" (in the Short summary).

(It's not really necessary, but I think it would add a bit of clarity.)

Topic: Final approaches (6)
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 1:54:11 PM
In the simpler case (1) I'd recommend changing the "and" to "followed by".

In either case, the reader might wonder whether a single, unadorned noun constitutes a "noun phrase".

Topic: The Food of the Gods
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 1:40:05 PM
thar wrote:
d'oh!

A table lamp, yes, but don't expect much from a standard lamp. They just trot out the same old stuff you already know.

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I guess a table lamp has no standards! Boo hoo!



I must ask: Is it common in British English to refer to what we Yanks call a "floor lamp" as a "standard lamp"?

Topic: This box set includes...
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 1:22:53 PM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, is there anything wrong in these sentences?

Short summary
This box set includes Ye Bang, Behind the Scenes: Ye Bang and Preview: Ye Bang. A romcom about an ambitious young saleswoman caught between the choice of her career or her relationship.

Long summary
This box set includes the movie, Ye Bang, Behind the Scenes: Ye Bang and Preview: Ye Bang. In Ye Bang, a happily married couple facing hurdles when wife Rose starts a new job as a saleswoman and in her ambition to succeed, begins to meet more than just sales targets. Then, watch how the people behind Ye Bang created the movie in Ye Bang: BTS, and lastly, enjoy the romcom preview in Preview: Ye Bang.

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I'm confused. I gather that the set consists of a movie (Ye Bang), a preview (Preview: Ye Bang) and something (a documentary?) called eitherBehind the Scenes: Ye BangorYe Bang: Behind the Scenes. (I don't know which.)

Despite the confusion, I'm fairly sure there's no reason for the word "and" to be in italics.

Topic: The Food of the Gods
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 12:50:41 PM
A well-worn armchair is likely to have strong opinions, too — though a table lamp is more likely to shed light on the situation.

Whistle

Topic: early bird
Posted: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 11:58:25 AM
"Last-minute" is the opposite of "early-bird".

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