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Profile: NKM
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User Name: NKM
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Retired computer programmer; musician
Interests: Language in general, English in particular
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, February 14, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, September 24, 2018 7:39:24 PM
Number of Posts: 4,886
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: It's I/we/they/she/he who....
Posted: Monday, September 24, 2018 3:20:23 PM
DragO has explained it very well, but the fact is that this kind of construction can be confusing and unwieldy. Quite often, if you think about how to say it you're likely decide to change it to a more comfortable form.

  "I wonder why it seems like I'm always the one who has to do that boring task."

Topic: Create
Posted: Monday, September 24, 2018 3:03:06 PM
Here, "create" is a transitive verb, with "somewhere that was as environmentally-friendly as possible" as its direct object.

It is not particularly unusual for adverbs to be used this way, introducing a clause which serves as a direct object.

  "I remember when I first met you."
  "You can't imagine how it feels …."


Topic: Grammar used in the CV example
Posted: Monday, September 24, 2018 2:44:59 PM
"Completed " and "Played " are past simple.

There is a long participle phrase ("demonstrating …"), which contains two other particple (actually gerund) phrases ("interacting …" and "providing …").

Topic: Question tag
Posted: Sunday, September 23, 2018 7:48:05 PM
In American English, "haven't" serves as a negative of "have" only when it's an auxiliary verb. Otherwise the negative is "don't have".

  "You have a dog, don't you?" = "Haven't you got a dog?" or "Don't you have a dog?"

In "have got" (expressing possession), "have" is not (or at least does not feel like) an auxiliary verb, unless it is fully pronounced and stressed as a separate word.

  Thus "You have got a dog, haven't you?" but "You've got a dog, don't you?"



"Haven't you a dog?" is clear enough and perfectly grammatical, but it doesn't sound American.

Topic: Structure
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 4:38:18 PM
They're all correct, but not the most likely way to say it.

  "Shall we walk or go by car? "

Once again, rhythm affects the ease and "comfort level" of speech.

Topic: Eightieth High Priest Horiuchi vs the Eightieth High Priest Horiuchi
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 4:19:52 PM
Excellent suggestion!

Topic: Do/will
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 4:14:41 PM
In fact, "won't" is far more common in American English, too. "Doesn't start" is more formal.
Topic: Ing
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 3:54:43 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Is there a difference between the following two?

I'm going to have a party next Saturday. I hope you can come.

I'm having a party next Saturday. I hope you can come.



The only difference is that one is two words longer than the other.

Topic: Do/will
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 3:52:54 PM
They mean the same, but they express rather different feelings.

"It doesn't start" is a matter-of-fact observation; "it won't start" suggests that it's being unreasonable or perverse and you're strongly displeased.

Topic: Word
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 3:48:00 PM
Yes. I think "schedule" is most likely in AE.

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