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Profile: Parpar1836
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User Name: Parpar1836
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Editor, researcher, writer
Interests: Collecting cobalt glass, jewelry-making, funky and antique things, books
Gender: Female
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Joined: Monday, June 30, 2014
Last Visit: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:08:25 PM
Number of Posts: 261
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Are hyphens needed?
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:59:55 AM
I might hyphenate (I'm big on hyphenating certain idioms and constructions, although I hope not excessively), so I'd say "a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity."
Topic: to be on you
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 10:07:06 PM
Instead of "is on you," I'd say "is yours."

Instead of "will be on you," try "will be yours."

Another way of saying this is "It's up to you" or "It's your responsibility."

(1) I advise you not to do that. However, the final decision is yours.

(2) I cannot look after my grandfather next week because I have to travel. The responsibility rests with you.


Or: "It's now your responsibility." Or: "You're in charge now."
Topic: the full December
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 10:02:51 PM
It sounds odd, indeed!

My store will be closed all through December or My store will be closed during the entire month of December are more natural English expressions.

More suggestions:

My store will be closed from the first of December to the end of the month.
My store will be closed from December 1 to 31.
My store will be closed December first through the thirty-first.
Topic: single or double quotation marks.
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:54:05 PM
He called me an idiot.

He said to me, "You know, you're a real idiot."

Topic: He arrived at his apartment, distancing himself
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:50:03 PM
Which begs the question: can one be both calm and maniacal?
Topic: He arrived at his apartment, distancing himself
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 8:05:09 PM
I'd like to post an alternative suggestion to FounDit's excellent one. If you want to keep the "distancing from reality" clause at the beginning of the passage, it could be revised thus:

More and more, he felt distanced from reality. He arrived at his apartment, calmly sat down in the dining room, reached for the flyer and a sheet of blank paper, then obsessively wrote down letter patterns from the wooden alphabet cubes, and scribbled intricate mazes and symbols only he could understand.


More and more, he felt distanced from reality. He arrived at his apartment, calmly sat down in the dining room, reached for the flyer and a sheet of blank paper, then compulsively began to write down letter patterns from the wooden alphabet cubes, and scribbled intricate mazes and symbols that would not have made any sense whatsoever to anyone else.
Topic: Blunt-spoken, coarse-tongued, profane?
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:32:16 PM
First of all, thank you for your colorfully direct suggestions.

I'm writing a story about a production, Arrival & Departure, which just opened at Fountain Theatre, Los Angeles. It's directed and scripted by Stephen Sachs, loosely based on the classic British film Brief Encounter. I saw the movie online, twice, and am certainly game for seeing it again, even though I know how it ends.

Those of you who've seen Brief Encounter know that it's about two respectable married middle-class persons—Laura, a 30-ish/40-ish mother, and Alec, a doctor—who meet at a suburban railway station's Refreshment Room (a tearoom/snack bar/waiting place/lounge) by chance, and fall in love, but ultimately decide that they cannot pursue the affair. Alec accepts an offer to move to Johannesburg, South America, which means that he and Laura will likely never see each other again, and they can't stay in contact through letters.

The film in notable for its absolutely convincing performances and David Lean's moody camera work. It was made in 1945, towards the end of the war, but is set in 1938, just before the war broke out. Noël Coward produced the film and wrote the script (which is based on his short play Still Life).

Laura and Alec's serious, sorrowful, increasingly guilt-ridden relationship is contrasted to that of a working-class couple employed at the station: Myrtle is barista at the Refreshment Room, and Albert is a ticket-collector-guard. Their courtship is notably unsecret. They exchange lines about dating quite openly. Albert demands a kiss across the counter, and in so doing, knocks a pile of sweet buns to the floor. Myrtle has a dignity about her that is quite disarming. We know that she and Albert will be fine.

In Sachs's revisioning, the suburban Refreshment Room is replaced by a Dunkin' Donuts in a New York City subway station. Instead of Laura and Alec, there are Emily and Sam, who are played by Deaf actors Deanne Bray and Troy Kotsur, who, in real life, are married to each other. Emily, who's hard-of-hearing but wants to explore her Deaf identity, has a hearing husband, Doug, and unhappy teenage daughter who becomes the victim of a classmate's cruel prank on a teen dating site.

And instead of Myrtle and Albert, there's Mya and Russell. Mya is a food-service worker who presides over the coffeeshop counter. Russell is a security guard. Mya, who is partly Filipina, has an most uninhibited mouth. She is the character I'm trying to describe. Her language is colorfully direct, to be sure, liberally peppered with profanity. Russell is trying to persuade her to come with him on a date, but she's reluctant. (Definitely not maledictory, but she's been hurt before, and has a cynical attitude towards Russell's overtures.) The back-and-forth between these characters makes a good counterpoint to the friendship between Emily and Sam, which deepens to love but jeopardizes their families. Still, they are re-energized. Sam decides to pursue his put-on-hold career as a filmmaker, and Emily takes a more assertive role in her family.
Topic: Blunt-spoken, coarse-tongued, profane?
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:45:38 PM
I've been struggling to find an adjective that succinctly describes a character in a play who uses a lot of profanity, and who is upfront and outspoken about her feelings. Foul-mouthed doesn't feel right. I currently have blunt-talking, but I'm not entirely sure about that. I have already checked the thesaurus listings on TFD, but am wondering if my intrepid colleagues on the Forum may have a zippier, zingier suggestion or two.
Topic: Word Chains
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 10:13:29 PM
sisters of mercy
Topic: higher education vs tertiary education
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 10:06:54 PM
As Thar noted, here in the U.S., we commonly use the term post-secondary (or postsecondary) instead of tertiary.

Beyond the secondary level is graduate school, the most advanced track being doctoral studies.

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