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Profile: Jagadeesh Bangalore
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User Name: Jagadeesh Bangalore
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Thursday, June 26, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, September 1, 2019 8:07:03 PM
Number of Posts: 399
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Punctuation for compound noun
Posted: Thursday, August 29, 2019 2:41:07 PM
FounDit wrote:
Jagadeesh Bangalore wrote:

Good afternoon,
...
is the proper punctuation/usage?

I'd appreciate the response with details.

Thanks in advance
Since it is obtained by carbonizing felt, it seems to me it should be called "carbonized felt".




I totally agree with you FounDit. That was my first thought too, but when I looked up the usage on the web, I found most companies and agencies marketing that item, used both 'carbon felt' and 'Carbon Felt', with a few instances of 'Carbon felt' too. Apparently the industry uses the name 'carbon felt' and accepts it.

But, as Hope123 has mentioned in his aside, (and my response to the same), I had a very uneasy / uncomfortable feeling to use 'carbon felt'. Hence I thought if that could be fixed by proper punctuation.

Thanks a lot
Topic: Punctuation for compound noun
Posted: Thursday, August 29, 2019 2:31:52 PM
Hope123 wrote:
Good morning to you too, JB.

This is an example of a noun used as an adjective to modify another noun so it does not need to be hyphenated. Capitals would only be used if it were a brand name.

Check out some examples of nouns used as adjectives and if you google it you will find they call this all kinds of fancy names.

http://myenglishgrammar.com/lesson-12-modifiers/4-nouns-as-modifiers.html

As an aside, felt can be both a noun and a verb. English is strange, right?



Thanks a lot Hope. In fact, my very concern for proper punctuation was what you have expressed in your aside. The term 'carbon felt' gave me a strange & uneasy feeling! My first reaction was 'What did carbon feel?' That's why I wanted an unambiguous (?) way of writing the noun, if at all possible!

Thanks again
Topic: Punctuation for compound noun
Posted: Thursday, August 29, 2019 6:13:02 AM

Good afternoon,

In the sentence " They sell carbon felt for a windscreen ... ", "carbon felt" is a composite material obtained by carbonising the felt. When referring to this material, should the two words 'Carbon' and 'Felt' be capitalised or hyphenated or both?

That is, which of
1. "carbon felt";
2. "Carbon Felt";
3. "carbon-felt"; or
4. "Carbon-Felt"

is the proper punctuation/usage?

I'd appreciate the response with details.

Thanks in advance


Topic: Nuance ...
Posted: Sunday, June 9, 2019 2:53:47 AM
Applause Applause Applause

Thank you very much Thar
Topic: Nuance ...
Posted: Saturday, June 8, 2019 3:06:11 AM
Just now came across a quotation attributed to Richard Bach -

Quote:
I'm here not because I am supposed to be here, or because I'm trapped here, but because I'd rather be with you than anywhere else in the world. --- Richard Bach


Wondering how the meaning would change if the same were reworded as -
"I'm not here because I am supposed to ... " or even,

"I'm neither here because I am supposed to be here, nor because ... "

May I request our experts for their opinions, explanations?

Thanks in advance
Topic: print <out>
Posted: Saturday, June 8, 2019 2:49:39 AM
I observe that the word "Print" also has another meaning - particularly in the context of filling out a form (or even making notes) -
"To write (hand-write) in CAPITALS"
.
Topic: judge someone by/on something
Posted: Saturday, June 1, 2019 12:57:32 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello Fruity.
There is a difference - and it is not something you can see in those dictionaries.

If you judge someone by their appearance, you look at them and think "He is wearing worn clothes with a few holes, his skin is stained in odd places and his hair's a mess - therefore, he is a lazy, dirty and probably criminal character."
You see his appearance, and you assume things about his character.

If you judge someone on their appearance, you look at them and judge what you see. You see his skin is dark and assume he didn't wash (rather than that he has a tan), or you see his worn clothes and assume he can't afford good clothes.
You see his appearance, and you assume things about his appearance.

**************
If you are a judge marking (grading) students' examination papers.

You judge the students by their answers. You look at their answers and decide things about the students.

You judge the answers on grammar. You look at the grammar and decide whether it's good grammar (or not).


Applause Applause Applause
Topic: laced tea
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 12:48:30 PM
Also, Belladonna is a homeopathic drug, quite commonly used.
Topic: pass urine
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2019 9:17:23 AM
In India the euphemistic term is "Susu" ...
Topic: all night last night or all of last night
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 9:52:55 PM
robjen wrote:
(1) The people upstairs made a lot of noise all night yesterday.

(2) The people upstairs made a lot of noise all night last night.

(3) The people upstairs made a lot of noise all of last night.

Which one is correct? Thank you for your help.




In the sentence (1) the usage 'all night yesterday' is irregular.

Of course the sentence (2) seems to mean the same, but it is irregular to use the term 'night' twice - 'all night last night'

Only (3) is correct.