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Profile: denniszzzzz
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User Name: denniszzzzz
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Tuesday, June 10, 2014
Last Visit: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 4:56:41 PM
Number of Posts: 24
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Do these statements sound natural to native English speakers?
Posted: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 4:56:40 PM
In (3), the 'to' after 'better' is a typo.
Topic: Do these statements sound natural to native English speakers?
Posted: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 3:41:18 PM
(1)It is better to be an actor than to be a playwright.

(2)It is better to be an actor than a playwright.

(3)It is better to being an actor than being a playwright.

(4)It is better being an actor than a playwright.

In (2), I take out the 2nd "to be". In both (3) and (4), I change "to be" to "being".

My sentences seem grammatically okay. I am not exactly sure about that. Because I am not a native English speaker, I cannot tell whether they sound natural to native speakers.

Please help. Thanks.
Topic: Does it matter where to put the highlighted phrases?
Posted: Sunday, August 24, 2014 3:09:37 PM
(1a) They write two letters to me every week.

(1b) They write to me two letters every week.


(2a) They talk about how smart they are to me.

(2b) They talk to me about how smart they are.


I have heard from a few people that the second sentences sound awkward.

Could someone please explain that? Thanks.
Topic: looking for verbs
Posted: Sunday, August 24, 2014 12:28:22 AM
Suppose that someone does not have much luck in his life. Whatever he does, something bad happens to him. These challenges prevent him from making his dreams come true.

Here is my sentence.

(ex) Reality ________ him.

Can I use the following words for the blank?

(a) is against
(b) opposes
(c) hinders

Thanks everyone.
Topic: Why are these sentences grammatically wrong?
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 9:30:58 PM
(1a) I like to study.

(1b) I like studying.

(2a) I like to study more than to work.

(2b) I like studying more than working.

(2c) I like to study more than I like to work.


I have asked at least 10 people about whether these sentences are correct. 50% say that they are correct and the other 50% say that they are wrong.

I do not see anything wrong with these sentences. Do you see any mistakes? Thanks.
Topic: Do you need to add "the" to the sentence?
Posted: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 4:11:12 AM
I am sorry about being confusing. I should revise my sentences and put them in a context.

(A) I want to photocopy pictures of the cute animals in this book.

(B) I want to photocopy the pictures of the cute animals in this book.

(C) I want to photocopy the pictures of cute animals in this book.

(D) I want to photocopy pictures of cute animals in this book.

Here is the context. Assume that you have skimmed through the book and know for sure that it has pictures of cute animals. I do not have specific choices of the pictures; I want any pictures.

Which sentence best fits the context? Thanks.
Topic: I have another confusing grammar question?
Posted: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 3:53:07 AM
Here are my sentences.

(1) The citizens in this country are friendly and nice to all the foreign visitors.

(2) The citizens in this country are friendly and nice to all their foreign visitors.

(3) The citizens in this country are friendly and nice to all foreign visitors.

Which sentence makes the most sense?

What I am looking for is one which means that the citizens are nice to every foreign visitor in general. The citizens do not have to know the visitors personally to be nice to them.

Every year, I see many foreign visitors and do not really them personally. I am very nice to them and help them when they are lost.

Please explain which sentence is correct. Thanks.
Topic: Do you need to add "the" to the sentence?
Posted: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 11:12:16 PM
I have two sentences below.

(A) I want to photocopy pictures of the cute animals in this book.

(B) I want to photocopy the pictures of the cute animals in this book.

Without any more context, do you have to add "the" before the word "pictures"?

Thanks.
Topic: Would it be correct to use a verb after the word, "against"?
Posted: Sunday, August 10, 2014 1:54:06 AM
I have two verbs in my mind now which are to rebel and to revolt
Out of all the sample sentences with these words in my dictionaries, a noun is used after "to rebel against" and "to revolt against".

(1) I rebel against having to get up from my bed at 5am every morning.

(2) I revolt against having to lie for you.

Can I use a verb, such as having in the sentences above? Thank you.
Topic: proper usage of the word, felicitous
Posted: Friday, August 8, 2014 10:22:12 PM
felicitous means well-chosen and suitable

I have heard from some people that it is very challenging to use this word correctly.

When do you use it? How do you use it?

May I get some help with the word? Thanks a lot.