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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 6:00:16 AM
Number of Posts: 470
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: anyone/just anyone
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 1:04:13 AM
Thank you very much, Tautophile,

I think 'anyone' in the first sentence is more or less equivalent to 'someone', but also emphasizes the idea that the identity of the person is not at all important (someone, no matter who it is).

But it seems to me that in '2' the dog just attacks anyone that is around. It attacks more than one person.

Would you say that is correct?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: anyone/just anyone
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 12:04:51 AM
Are these sentences both correct:

1) How would you feel if your dog attacks anyone?

2) How would you feel if your dog attacks just anyone?

Is there a difference in the meanings?


Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: his brother in Italy
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2020 5:41:20 PM
Thank you very much, DragOnspeaker,

I see your point.

Which of the following would you consider acceptable:

1a) John and his brother, in Italy, think that the plan will work.

2a) John's brother, in Italy, thinks that the plan will work.


3a) Pete and his henchmen, dressed in black suits, came here yesterday.

4a) Pete's henchmen, dressed in black suits, came here yesterday.

Here the clauses are definitely non-restrictive, but the first two seem incorrect to me and the second pair seem OK. I think the fact that the clause is long changes things.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: his brother in Italy
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 6:29:59 AM
1) John and his brother in Italy think that the plan will work.
2) John's brother in Italy thinks that the plan will work.
Is 'in Italy' restrictive/defining?

Do those sentences necessarily imply that John has more than one brother?

3) Pete and his henchmen dressed in black suits came here yesterday.

4) Pete's henchmen dressed in black suits came here yesterday.

Do those sentences necessarily imply that Pete has also henchmen who are
not dressed in black suits? Is 'dressed in black suits' restrictive/defining?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: who both know Tom
Posted: Sunday, May 10, 2020 6:36:25 AM
Thank you both very much,

So the sentence:

4a) I talked to James and wrote to Melanie, who knew Tom.


is ambiguous, right?

One can't be sure if James knew Tom or not.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: who both know Tom
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2020 11:38:53 PM
Which are correct:

1) He bought me a cellphone and lent me a computer, which were what I ne
eded.
2) He bought me a cellphone and lent me a computer, which were essential for me.
3) He bought me a cellphone and lent me a computer, which were both essential for me.

4) I talked to James and wrote to Melanie, who know Tom.

5) I talked to James and wrote to Melanie, who both know Tom.
6) I talked to James and wrote to Melanie, both of whom know Tom.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: everybody/anybody
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2020 6:40:49 PM
1) Anybody can do that.
2) Everybody can do that.

I think there is a difference. I can't put my finger on it. I am afraid that it might not even be possible. Could it be done?


Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: where we have a talk
Posted: Tuesday, May 5, 2020 1:22:57 AM
a. This room is where we have a talk before going to the workshop.

Does (a) imply that every time we go to the workshop we have had a talk in that room?

b. This is the room where they meditate before going to bed
.

Does (b) imply that every time they go to bed they have meditated?

c. We have a talk before going to the workshop.
d. They meditate before going to bed.


I think (c) and (d) have that 'every time' meaning, but I am not entirely sure about (a) and (b). Maybe if there is no indication to the contrary, that's what they'd mean.

Many thanks.
Topic: sacastically
Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2020 4:53:39 PM
Thank you very much, Tautophile,

Would you say these are correct as well:

2) I was asking that question to John.
3) I asked that question to John.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: sacastically
Posted: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 5:29:03 PM
Is this sentence correct:

1) I was asking that question sarcastically to John.

Does it mean I was asking John that question and I was being sarcastic, or does it mean I was asking that question (maybe not asking John but someone else) and I was being sarcastic to John?


Gratefully,
Navi