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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, January 24, 2021 10:06:33 PM
Number of Posts: 528
[0.05% of all post / 0.22 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: whoever hasn't
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2021 6:58:48 PM
1) Whoever hasn't done their homework is not allowed to go to the show tonight.

2) Whoever hasn't done their homework cannot go to the show tonight.

3) Whoever hasn't done their homework will not be allowed to go to the show tonight.

4) Whoever hasn't done their homework is not going to allowed to go to the show tonight.

In which of the above sentences the idea is:

a) Whoever hasn't finished their homework by now will not be allowed to go to the show tonight

and in which of them the idea is:

b) Whoever hasn't finished their homework by tonight will not be allowed to go tot he show


I think they are all slightly ambiguous except for '1', which has meaning 'a'.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: married twice
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2021 4:15:10 AM
1) John married an English woman twice.
2) Twice John married an English woman.

3) John married English women twice.
4) Twice John married English women.

5) John married two English women twice.

6) Twice John married two English women.

Which of these sentences can be used if one can only marry one woman at a time?

Can '1' and '2' be used if he didn't marry the same woman twice?
Can '5' and '6' be used if he married each woman once?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: the minds of young people
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2021 12:52:17 AM
Which is correct:
1) They have given up on the old people. They are trying to change minds of young people.
2) They have given up on the old people. They are trying to change the minds of young people.

Does '2' mean that they are trying to change the minds of all young people?

Gratefully,
Navi



Topic: much of what he said
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2021 12:49:48 AM
1) Much of what he said was true.

Does that mean more than half of what he said was true? Could you tell about what percent of what he said was true?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: that he should/for him to
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 6:34:08 AM
Are these sentences correct:

1) That he should acknowledge that he has made a mistake will mark a moment in history.


2) For him to acknowledge that he has made a mistake will mark a moment in history.



Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: good for him
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 6:32:45 AM
1) It would be good for him to lose.
2) For him to lose would be good.

Those could mean that he would benefit from losing. But could it also mean:

a) It would be good that he should lose.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: if unconventional
Posted: Tuesday, January 12, 2021 6:55:08 AM
Thank you both very much,

Yes, Romany, both replies were helpful. Your replies and DragOn's always are.

I just thought 'if' was somehow weaker than 'even though' and basically mean 'even though maybe...', but apparently that is not the case. Interestingly the American Heritage Dictionary gives both meanings as possible:

2. Although possibly; even though: It is a handsome if useless trinket.

https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=if

You have both 'although possibly' and 'even though'!

But it seems that native speakers all agree that the meaning is the same as 'even though'.

Thanks again.

Respectfully,
Navi
Topic: if unconventional
Posted: Sunday, January 10, 2021 7:03:21 AM
1) It was a daring, if unconventional, idea to use a bicycle to do the job.

Is the speaker clearly saying the idea was unconventional or merely saying that maybe it was unconventional?

Does '1' mean the same as:

2) 1) It was a daring, although unconventional, idea to use a bicycle to do the job.

Gratefully,
Navi

Topic: not a danger
Posted: Saturday, January 9, 2021 7:25:14 PM
Are these sentences correct:

1) We considered the madman not a threat.

2) We considered the madman not dangerous.

3) We saw the madman as not a threat.
4) We saw the madman as not dangerous.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: unlike you
Posted: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 4:33:24 PM
1) I'm too old for this kind of thing, but unlike you, I know it.
2) I know I am too old for this kind of thing, but you don't.

Could these sentences mean:

a) I'm too old for this kind of thing and I know it. You're too old for this kind of thing, but you don't know it.

They could obviously mean:
b) You don't know that I am too old for this kind of thing, but I do.


Gratefully,
Navi