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User Name: azz
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Thursday, May 15, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, August 1, 2021 10:52:05 PM
Number of Posts: 421
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: to test it
Posted: Saturday, July 31, 2021 1:49:53 AM
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
Just to get you back on track, and then you can carry on.
Either: I told him my theory...
Or: I explained my theory to him...
Or: I shared my theory with him...




Thank you both so much.

So, "I told my theory to him" is incorrect?

Many thanks.
Topic: to test it
Posted: Friday, July 30, 2021 4:14:46 AM
a. I told my theory to him to test it in the lab.
b. I shared my theory with him to test it in the lab.


The idea is that I wanted him to test it in the lab.
I told my theory to him/shared my theory with him so that he would test it in the lab,

Are sentences (a) and (b) grammatically correct and do they have the meaning I want them to have?

I don't think they do, but the following seem to work.

c. I gave him the book to give to Harry.
d. I gave the book to him to give to Harry.

e. I told him that story to tell the kids.
f. I told that story to him to tell the kids.


I am confused!

Many thanks.
Topic: they were in his drawer
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 3:47:10 AM
a. I am reading about weeds, because they grow in my garden.

b. We were talking about bullets, because they were in the suspect's desk drawer.
c. We were talking about bullets, because some were in the suspect's desk drawer.

Sentence (a) and (c) sound natural to me, and sentence (b) doesn't.
However
d. Bullets were in the suspect's desk drawer.
sounds fine.

Do you find (b) natural?
How about the other ones?

Many thanks.
Topic: if he wanted to
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2021 4:23:33 AM
a. I asked him to dance well if he wanted to.
b. I asked him to dance well if he wanted to do it.


I think (a) means
1. I asked him to dance well if he wanted to dance well.

and (b) could mean
2. I asked him to dance well if he wanted to dance.
or the same as (a).

In other words I think (b) is ambiguous.

Is that correct?

Many thanks.
Topic: some people part II
Posted: Friday, July 9, 2021 6:27:19 PM
a. He had to beg before some people would help him.

Is it possible that some people helped him without him having to beg?

b. He had to speak publicly about his problems before some people would help him.

Is it possible that some people helped him before his speaking publicly about his problems?

c. He had to beg so that some people would help him.

Is it possible that some people helped him without him having to beg?

d. He had to speak publicly about his problems so that some people would help him.

Is it possible that some people helped him before his speaking publicly about his problems?


I think in (b), (c) and (d) the answer is "no" and in (a) the answer is "yes".
I am not sure at all.

I think in (a) one assumes that he begs those people and therefore it is possible that some others have helped him.


Many thanks
Topic: some vs. certain
Posted: Tuesday, July 6, 2021 6:35:02 PM
a. We had to publish those documents so that some people would believe us.
b. We had to publish those documents so that certain people would believe us.


Do either of these imply that there were already some people who believed us before we published those documents?

Could they be used if prior to out publishing them nobody believed us?

Many thanks.
Topic: little bigger
Posted: Saturday, July 3, 2021 2:06:34 AM
a. They brought me a box little bigger than the one I had.
b. They brought me a little bigger box than the one I had.

c. They brought me boxes little bigger than the ones I had.
d. They brought me little bigger boxes than the ones I had.


Which are grammatically correct?

Many thanks

Topic: if not
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 1:21:34 AM
a. She said, if not that a decision in his favor had already been made, that it was definitely a sure thing.
b. She said, if not that a decision in his favor had already been made, it was definitely a sure thing.
c. She said, that if not a decision in his favor had already been made, it was definitely a sure thing.

Which of the above are grammatically correct and meaningful?

The idea is:
If she didn't say that a decision in his favor had already been made, she said that it was definitely a sure thing.
She said either that a decision in his favor had already been made, of that it was definitely a sure thing.

Would (a), (b) or (c) be acceptable in formal English?

Many thanks
Topic: little higher
Posted: Sunday, June 27, 2021 6:17:33 PM
a. He aspires to little higher praise than being called a good writer.
a1. He doesn't aspires to much higher praise than being called a good writer.

(Being called a good writer is basically enough for him and he doesn't need much higher praise.)

b. He is as good as his father, and there's little higher praise than that.
b1. He is as good as his father, and there isn't much higher praise than that.

(He's as good as his father, and there is not a lot of higher praise than that.)

Are the sentences grammatically correct and do they correspond the the meaning sentences in each case?

In the first two sentences 'little' and 'not much' modify 'higher', but in the second two sentences they modify the noun phrase 'higher praise' and are about the amount of higher praise possible.

Many thanks.
Topic: of which
Posted: Saturday, June 26, 2021 11:43:29 PM
a. The car whose owner was arrested was towed.
b. The car the owner of which was arrested was towed.
c. The car of which the owner was arrested was towed.


Which are grammatically correct?

I think (a) is natural, (b) is grammatical and (c) is archaic!

Many thanks