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User Name: azz
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Joined: Thursday, May 15, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, November 22, 2020 5:16:24 PM
Number of Posts: 373
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: not everyone
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 5:16:24 PM
a. Not everyone who is here knows anyone in your office.

I think (a) can have two different meanings:

1. Only some of the people who are here know everyone in your office.
2. Some of the people who are here don't know anyone in your office.

Am I right?

Many thanks.
Topic: as rapidly as
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2020 1:06:55 AM
a. As rapidly as they are moving, they'll be here soon.

b. As hard as John hit Henry, Henry must be in a lot of pain right now.


Are the above sentences grammatically correct and meaningful?

I am confused.

Generally, when 'as' is used like this with adjectives, the meaning is usually 'although'.

c. As precise as this instrument is, it sometimes gives wrong readings.

I don't think that could be used in a 'positive' sense.


Many thanks
Topic: chances of the other events
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2020 12:57:22 AM
a. The chances of event A happening are higher than the combined chances of the other events happening.
b. The chances of event A happening are higher than the combined chances of all the other events happening.

c. The chances of event A happening are higher than the chances of the other events happening combined.
d. The chances of event A happening are higher than the chances of all the other events happening combined.


Which of the above is grammatically correct and meaningful?

The assumption is that we are comparing probabilities of a number of events: A, B, C, D, E,...

The probability of A is higher than the probability of B + the probability of C + the probability of D ....

I don't like (d), and I don't like (c) that much either. In (d) I get the feeling that one is comparing the chances of A to the chances of all the other things happening together.

Many thanks.
Topic: three people
Posted: Thursday, November 5, 2020 5:01:07 PM
-Three people were injured in the car crash.
a-No, three people were not injured in the car crash. Five people were.

-Three people were arrested last night.
b-No, three people were not arrested last night. Two people were.


Are (a) and (b) correct in the given contexts?

I think they work because what has been said is being repeated. On its own (a) would mean
c. 'Three people were not injured in the car crash and the others were injured.'

Many thanks
Topic: good to organize
Posted: Thursday, October 29, 2020 3:49:43 AM
Thank you so much Thar.

The idea is that he is good at organizing trip and he should be given the job of organizing the trip we are going to undertake.

He is good for that purpose.

Many thanks
Topic: good to organize
Posted: Thursday, October 29, 2020 1:21:11 AM
a. He is good to organize the trip.
b. He is good for organizing the trip.


Are the above sentences grammatically correct?
Are they natural?

The idea is that he is good for that task.


Many thanks
Topic: who was holding a pan
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 9:19:13 PM
a. I saw your brother in the kitchen, who was holding a pan.

Is the above sentence grammatically correct?

I don't think it is, but maybe it would be acceptable in speech?


Many thanks.
Topic: runs the fastes
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 5:38:34 PM
a. He runs the fastest of any student.
b. He runs the fastest of all students.

c. He runs the fastest of any of our student.
d. He runs the fastest of all of our students.


Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct?
Which are natural?

Many thanks
Topic: most beautitfully
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 5:37:25 PM
a. He plays the guitar, the drums and the piano, but he plays the piano most beautifully.
b. He plays the guitar, the drums and the piano, but he plays the piano the most beautifully

c. Tom, Pete and Harry all play the piano, but Tom plays it most beautifully.
d. Tom, Pete and Harry all play the piano, but Tom plays it the most beautifully.


Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct?
Which are natural?

Many thanks.
Topic: some of his friends
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:08:04 AM
Thank you so much Romany!

Yes. I get it. I just wanted to see how the comma changes things.

b. Some of his friends who don't like me wrote that letter.


I think this one is unambiguously saying that he has friends don't like and friends who do like me and some of those belonging to the first group wrote the letter.

Am I correct?

Many thanks.