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Profile: tommaso
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User Name: tommaso
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, May 8, 2014
Last Visit: Thursday, May 19, 2016 9:15:03 PM
Number of Posts: 1,029
[0.10% of all post / 0.44 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: I also authorize B to be the owner of property involved in the application.
Posted: Thursday, May 19, 2016 9:15:03 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello tommaso!

I do not think anyone can answer your question.
The laws in different countries are different.
The laws in any one country are different for different types of property.

If it is a house, then you have to register it (in Britain) with some government agency.
If it is a car, there are other 'formalities' - a different 'agency' (in Britain).
If it is a painting or jewellery, or something very valuable, then your insurance company needs to know.
Some things, you can just give to someone without writing anything.


Thanks.
Topic: I also authorize B to be the owner of property involved in the application.
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 11:13:58 PM
A has a property under her name.
A would like to change the property owner name to B.
It has be apply the document.
A lets B have the authority to apply the document.



A has to write a authorization letter.

I, A hereby authorize B to apply Letters of Adminstration.
I also authorize B to be the owner of property involved in the application.




Is authorize used correctly?
Topic: It has 10 more teeth than a killer whale.
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 8:46:16 PM
mactoria wrote:
tommaso wrote:


It has 10 more teeth than a killer whale.


Is the sentence go wrong?
The image should be a killer whale.



Tommaso: The main problem with the sentence is that there is no "it." The picture you included is of a killer whale (well, supposedly), so there is no other thing/animal/whale/whatever that explains what has 10 more teeth than the killer whale. A proper sentence would be one that said something like "A _____ has 10 more teeth than a killer whale," with the blank space being filled in with the proper subject.

Also, your actual question, "Is the sentence go wrong?" is incorrect grammatically. One correct option for what you tried to write might be "Is this sentence correct?" or perhaps "Is this sentence correct grammatically?"


Thanks.
Topic: It has 10 more teeth than a killer whale.
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 10:56:33 PM


It has 10 more teeth than a killer whale.


Is the sentence go wrong?
The image should be a killer whale.
Topic: Does times square branch have Melissa & Doug cube puzzle?
Posted: Monday, April 25, 2016 9:54:29 PM
The toy shop has 5 branches.
I would like to buy a toy found in the online toy shop.
I wrote a letter to them and asked,

"Does times square branch have Melissa & Doug cube puzzle?"


Does it sound natural?
Topic: Please move in.
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2016 10:48:38 PM


I asked my friend to move to the right side.
"Please move in."

Is the preposition used correctly?
Topic: The fisherman ripped a big hole in his net.
Posted: Thursday, March 10, 2016 1:30:13 AM
The fisherman ripped a big hole in his net.

What does this mean?
It is mean the net got a big hole because of the fisherman?
Or the net got a big hole because of the fish?
Topic: Is it stray dog or someone's dog?
Posted: Monday, March 7, 2016 7:34:06 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

Your sentence is grammatically correct, but does not sound very natural to me.

You may hear "Is it a stray or someone's (dog)?" - but I think that you would more normally hear something like "Is it a stray or does someone own it?" or "Is it a stray or does it have an owner?"

Because you are both looking at it and know that it's a dog, you do not need to say 'dog'.


Thanks.
Topic: Is the dog still following us?
Posted: Monday, March 7, 2016 7:32:22 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Is the dog still following us?" is totally fine - it's exactly what you would expect someone to say.

"Tailgate" is not the correct word. That is only used for vehicles, and it means 'follow too closely"

tailgate v
3. to follow or drive hazardously close to the rear of another vehicle.
(Random House)
to drive very close behind (a vehicle) (Collins)
To drive so closely behind (another vehicle) that one cannot stop or swerve with ease in an emergency. (American Heritage)


Thanks.
Topic: Is the dog still following us?
Posted: Saturday, March 5, 2016 8:07:09 PM
My wife and I were being followed by a dog.
I didn't look at the back. After a while, I asked my wife,
"Is the dog still following us?"
"Is the dog still tailgating us?"

Are they sound grammatically correct?