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Psylium Options
bxlau
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 10:49:15 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/31/2010
Posts: 17
Neurons: 51
Location: Singapore
I have found a good natural medicine for constipation few months ago - that is psylium husk. Without which I would otherwise striving with emptying my bowel daily.

However,recently I went for my annual blood test and discovered my eosinophil (a specific white blood cell) has gone up significantly at 15% against the max of 6%. I quickly googled and found talks of psylium causes eosinophil level to go up in the form a allergy.

I probably have to stop consuming psylium if I am really hematologically allergic to psylium. But I am really reluctant to forgo psylium as it solves my basic daily problem! Can anyones share this matter and suggest an alternative to psylium to combat constipation. Although I have tried many thing like fruits, vege and anythings of high fiber, the effect can never be as prominent as psylium.

Thanks
dingdong
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 4:24:30 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/7/2010
Posts: 1,139
Neurons: 3,370
Location: Philippines
Not all fruits and veg are high-fibre. I think you should try eating more of them in their raw or semi-cooked state. Prunes in particular are supposed to do the job.
I eat loads of fruit and veg, and rarely have constipation.
srirr
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 4:31:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,507
Neurons: 484,288
Having roughage in my diet, drinking lot of water, eating un-peeled fruits (only those which are eatable, like apple, cucumber)
are perhaps some of my diet-habits which keep me away from constipation.
Dreamy
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 4:50:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/11/2009
Posts: 1,501
Neurons: 10,806
Location: Hamilton, Waikato, New Zealand
Don't eat more cheese than one slice per day, keep a supply of dates to be eaten throughout the day, and if you still need more of a trigger include the occasional bran biscuit in your diet. Fluid intake is also important.
pedro
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 5:02:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
Less fat (less food?), more fibre, more fluids,more exercise
Christine
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 6:21:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/3/2009
Posts: 3,917
Neurons: 15,842
Bran cereal or pancakes or bread. Water.

Sometimes a cup of coffee.
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 12:13:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/2/2009
Posts: 674
Neurons: 1,222
Location: United States
You appear hypochondriacal with your constipation,when you could condition your bowels patiently to eliminate itself without making it an issue.I have known family members, whose bowels move only once or twice a week and still not considered pathological.
bethpacheco
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 1:29:38 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/26/2010
Posts: 2
Neurons: 1,407
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
oats, brown rice, no meat, prunes, and honey!
RuthP
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 2:02:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Hi bxlau

First: Defecating less than once a day does not mean one is constipated. Most people will fall in a range between once every three days and three times a day. A few people will have normal bowel habits outside those limits.

There is a medically recognized protocol for diagnosing constipation called "Rome 3". Two of the following must be happening; one is not enough to make it constipation.

* Less than 3 bowel movements per week
* Straining
* Lumpy/hard stools
* Sensation of ano-rectal obstruction
* Sensation of incomplete defecation
* Manual maneuvering required to defecate

Second: Raised eosinophil (a type of white blood cell) counts are associated with allergies, but are not diagnostic. Here is a page Merk Manual: Eosinophilia from Merk on line regarding causes of eosinophilia. It is usually associated with respiratory or dermal (skin or contact) allergies.

Testing for a food allergy would be by lab tests looking for IgE antibodies to the specific substance (psyllium) and / or by skin patch testing. The IgE test would be done on a blood sample.

You are at greater risk of allergic reaction if you are using loose psyllium-husk powder. This is due to respiratory exposure from breathing the powder.

Third: True constipation may be caused by a number of different factors, some benign intrinsic, some related to disease processes, some dietary. If the fiber seemed to work for you, then it's probably dietary. If true constipation does not respond to dietary changes, then a work-up by a doctor may be in order.

Fourth: there are two general types of fiber: Soluble and insoluble. In general, one thinks of insoluble fiber for treating constipation and soluble fiber for lowering cholesterol. Psyllium husks contain quite a bit of both, but are thought of more as soluble fiber. Other sources of combined fiber are: Flax seed and oat bran (whole oats, steel-cut oats, or rolled oats; not "instant" oatmeal - the fibers are cut too short there).

On a related note: Soluble fiber attracts water as it moves through the intestine. This suggests the possibility that you may wish to increase your fluid intake. If you are even mildly dehydrated, your body pulls water back out of the intestines to keep a sufficient amount in cells and blood vessels. Water, juice, coffee and tea (black, green, herbal) are all suitable for increasing intake. (And, anticipating protest: No, the diuretic effects of tea and coffee do not overwhelm the amount of fluid consumed. Be happy and drink that iced tea or coffee on a hot day.)
VSB
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 3:36:15 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/16/2010
Posts: 16
Neurons: 48
Location: Argentina
I always had in mind that by eating fruits, veg and drinking water you could solve the problem.
Lately I've been told that this situation has to do with holding back things/ problems, so let your problems go!
tusk
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 4:04:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/4/2010
Posts: 174
Neurons: 522
Location: Cambridge, Canada
Increase your water intake, it does help.
I have also found carrots and beet roots very helpful for this problem.
As certain foods help you relieve constipation, similarly, certain foods can cause its symptoms. Try to identify such foods, and avoid them.
Very spicy food, green chilies particularly, can alleviate the problem, however, I will not recommend that approach, because the experience is not very pleasant for the rear end.
RainyDayTreat
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 4:09:43 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/14/2010
Posts: 13
Neurons: 63
Location: Huntsville, AL - USA
Cucumbers do it for me. Try eating a whole, medium-to-large-size cucumber, cut into cubes. I chew it well to avoid upset stomach.

I discovered the cucumber remedy a couple of months ago. I have suffered with the same affliction you have for as long as I can remember and then I started making a cucumber and red bell pepper salad. I narrowed it down to the cucumber. It may not work for everyone, but it's harmless to find out.
kaleem
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 6:04:37 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/27/2009
Posts: 3,252
Neurons: 9,948
Use "Benefibre" - really good medicine without any side effects.



Investigator
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 6:15:52 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/21/2010
Posts: 989
Neurons: 2,961
Location: Northern Nevàda
I like copious amounts of watermelon. It is high in fiber, antioxidents and another nutrient, which escapes me now but is very beneficial. Watermelon also has a low glycemic load.
jagxk
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 7:50:27 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 6/18/2009
Posts: 28
Neurons: 2,464
Location: Dunwoody, Georgia, United States
Eosinophilla is a rare side effect and it is possible that you may have it. Talk to your physician (MD) and follow his/her advise in using psylium. There are other things that could be causing the eosinophilla.
bxlau
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 10:56:37 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/31/2010
Posts: 17
Neurons: 51
Location: Singapore
RuthP wrote:
Hi bxlau

First: Defecating less than once a day does not mean one is constipated. Most people will fall in a range between once every three days and three times a day. A few people will have normal bowel habits outside those limits.

There is a medically recognized protocol for diagnosing constipation called "Rome 3". Two of the following must be happening; one is not enough to make it constipation.

* Less than 3 bowel movements per week
* Straining
* Lumpy/hard stools
* Sensation of ano-rectal obstruction
* Sensation of incomplete defecation
* Manual maneuvering required to defecate

Second: Raised eosinophil (a type of white blood cell) counts are associated with allergies, but are not diagnostic. Here is a page Merk Manual: Eosinophilia from Merk on line regarding causes of eosinophilia. It is usually associated with respiratory or dermal (skin or contact) allergies.

Testing for a food allergy would be by lab tests looking for IgE antibodies to the specific substance (psyllium) and / or by skin patch testing. The IgE test would be done on a blood sample.

You are at greater risk of allergic reaction if you are using loose psyllium-husk powder. This is due to respiratory exposure from breathing the powder.

Third: True constipation may be caused by a number of different factors, some benign intrinsic, some related to disease processes, some dietary. If the fiber seemed to work for you, then it's probably dietary. If true constipation does not respond to dietary changes, then a work-up by a doctor may be in order.

Fourth: there are two general types of fiber: Soluble and insoluble. In general, one thinks of insoluble fiber for treating constipation and soluble fiber for lowering cholesterol. Psyllium husks contain quite a bit of both, but are thought of more as soluble fiber. Other sources of combined fiber are: Flax seed and oat bran (whole oats, steel-cut oats, or rolled oats; not "instant" oatmeal - the fibers are cut too short there).

On a related note: Soluble fiber attracts water as it moves through the intestine. This suggests the possibility that you may wish to increase your fluid intake. If you are even mildly dehydrated, your body pulls water back out of the intestines to keep a sufficient amount in cells and blood vessels. Water, juice, coffee and tea (black, green, herbal) are all suitable for increasing intake. (And, anticipating protest: No, the diuretic effects of tea and coffee do not overwhelm the amount of fluid consumed. Be happy and drink that iced tea or coffee on a hot day.)

Hi Ruth,
Thanks for the valuable suggestions and education. From your analysis, I guess you may be a health professional. I think I will have to take another blood test to confirm three month later probably to test also the IgE as suggested. May be you are right I am a little hypochondriac in this case. Thanks again.
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