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The Lure of History and of Permanence Options
peterhewett
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 6:05:59 AM
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The lure history and permanence. I love the simplicity of this house which is a thousand plus years old.Imagine living in it and knowing that your family had lived there for a thousand years. What house designs do you favour?


Quote

£12m country estate goes on the market for first time in 1,000 years
By Daily Mail Reporter

It would be an attractive prospect for any house hunter. But those with their sights set on Shakenhurst Hall have always been disappointed - because the 1,300-acre estate has stayed in the hands of one family for almost 1,000 years.

The property is being put on the market for the first time in its lengthy history, which spans events including the Battle of Hastings and the Hundred Years' War.

The only problem that might still face aspiring owners is the £12million asking price - a little


The Grade II-listed main property boasts 13 bedrooms and seven bathrooms, and there are six farms and 12 houses and cottages dotted around the gardens.

Part of the estate is thought to have been gifted to a French baron by William the Conqueror as a reward for his part in the Norman Conquest.

The entire estate at Cleobury Mortimer, in Shropshire, was later passed to John de Meysey as a gift by King Edward III in 1349.

This time it was to reward 'services rendered overseas' - probably in battle against the French.

Whoever buys Shakenhurst will certainly live like a king.

The estate boasts its own lake and landscaped parkland, as well as shooting and fishing on the River Rea, which forms the north-west boundary of the estate.

The hall is largely Georgian, having been rebuilt for a second time in the 1790s, and contains a library, drawing room, morning room, reception hall, dining room, kitchen and service passage boasting period features such as regency chimney pieces and moulded cornices and overdoors.





The grounds, described as 'a legacy of historic Elizabethan, Georgian and Victorian designs', include a walled kitchen garden and a sunken rose garden.

There is also a butler's pantry room, boot room, scullery, cloakrooms, offices and cellars.
The estate is being sold jointly by agents Balfours and Savills after being put on the market by trustees of the estate of Michael Severne and his daughter Amanda, who were direct descendants of the de Meyseys.

Mr Severne ran a business from the estate until his death in 2007. Amanda died of cancer a year later, at the age of 54, leaving behind a husband and two sons in their 20s.

Given her sons' young age, and with the estate in financial difficulty, it was decided to place Shakenhurst into trust.

David Groves, land agent for Balfours, said it was 'extremely rare' to find a property with such history which had never been sold before.

Colleague Tim Main added: 'The Shakenhurst lineage dates back to 1086 and it is truly remarkable that this is the first time the property has been offered to the market.'
Mr Groves said that while the estate was passed down through the de Meysey family from 1349, it had actually been in the hands of their relatives in the decades preceding the King's intervention.

William Lorimere, a trustee of the estate and a relative of Mr Severne, said: 'What we do not know is what those services rendered overseas were which prompted the King to gift Shakenhurst to de Meysey.

'Shakenhurst was a royal estate, with inhabitants living on it like modern-day tenants.

'One can only speculate but 1349 was right in the thick of the Hundred Years' War - perhaps de Meysey took part and was rewarded with ownership of the estate for fighting against the French.'

He added that there was little option left but to sell the estate, as without the income from Mr Severne's business it was no longer financially viable.


Shakenhurst through the centuriesFollowing the Battle of Hastings, Shakenhurst Manor was given to Ralph de Toeni in the holding of Bayton.

It's believed Stephen de Suttenhurst held the Manor in the late 13th Century, succeeded by Walter de Shakenhurst, who is recorded as having complained in 1304 that items had been removed from his home on the property while he was in Scotland on the King's service.

Walter de Shakenhurst is recorded in 1349 as passing the Manor to his nephew John Meysey and his wife Joan, but he is thought to have lived at the property until 1366.

John Meysey's son, also named John, and his wife Anne, granted sections of the estate to John Blount in the 15th Century, but retained control of the large share.

It was at this point that the estate began being passed father-to-son each generation.
William Meyesey, his son Humphrey and Humphrey's son Thomas ran the estate until 1564, when Thomas died and his brother Leonard assumed control.

He was succeeded before 1619 by his son Thomas, who died soon after in 1622, passing the property to his son Matthias. Matthias' three sons died childless, so Matthias was succeeded, in about 1678, by his nephew Francis Meysey, who died just ten years later.

Francis's son John held the manor until his death in 1730. More childlessness then saw the manor pass from John's son Francis to his brother The Reverend John Meysey and then to the brothers' nephew Charles Watkins - their sister's son - who assumed the name Meysey to continue the history of the estate's lineage.

At the time of his death in 1774, the manor passed to his only child, daughter Anna Maria Meysey.

Her husband died before 1825, when she passed the home on to her children Charles, Anna Maria, Caroline and Mary Charlotte. Charles Meysey Meysey Wigley died in 1830, and the estate was divided between his sisters 15 years later, their mother having died in 1836.
The Manor of Shakenhurst fell to Mary Charlotte, then wife of Charles Wicksted of Betley Hall.

Her son Charles took ownership in 1878.

The manor is now in the hands of the trustees of the late Hugh Gurney, who died in 1913.

Desendents of the Meysey family have lived in the house during that period, the most recent being Michael Severne and his daughter Amanda.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1290586/12m-country-estate-goes-market
-time-1-000-years.html?ITO=1708&referrer=yahoo#ixzz0sKTQlhSB


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1290586/12m-country-estate-goes-market-time-1-000-years.html?ITO=1708&referrer=yahoo#ixzz0sKTHFV4h

Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 7:46:55 AM

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Oh, that is lovely! It's so sad it has to leave the family in this way. And very likely, someone without a clue of the history will destroy it in some way. :(
Christine
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 7:54:41 AM
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Simple?
peterhewett
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 8:12:03 AM
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Yes Christine, a simple uncomplicated design which adds to its beauty.
Cat
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 9:53:58 AM

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Ahh, Peter. What a beauty! I agree, simple but elegant. My favorite combination. I wish I could buy the house rather than dream of it. I read historical fiction based mostly in regency England. I'm happy to now have a picture to go with the descriptions I read about. Thanks for sharing. The history of my beloved US is too short for the likes of such great architecture.
Susie
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 9:59:04 AM
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I think it's beautiful. The history only adds to it's beauty. I hope it's in decent shape. I think at that price, if someone bought it, they would keep it up, and maybe even add too it a bit (not that it may need anything at all.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 10:07:35 AM

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Quite an impressive manor. That could be a perfect place to arrange The Annual Freedelfian Meeting ;-)
Have to bet more in pools and lottery.

Thanks for sharing, Peter!
dingdong
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 10:39:29 AM
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Susie wrote:
I think it's beautiful. The history only adds to it's beauty. I hope it's in decent shape. I think at that price, if someone bought it, they would keep it up, and maybe even add too it a bit (not that it may need anything at all.


Susie, wishful thinking; money and a sense of architectural aesthetics don't always go hand-in-hand. And at that selling price the most likely new owners are developers, celebrities or career criminals.
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:09:06 AM

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dingdong wrote:
Susie wrote:
I think it's beautiful. The history only adds to it's beauty. I hope it's in decent shape. I think at that price, if someone bought it, they would keep it up, and maybe even add too it a bit (not that it may need anything at all.

Susie, wishful thinking; money and a sense of architectural aesthetics don't always go hand-in-hand. And at that selling price the most likely new owners are developers, celebrities or career criminals.

Sadly, that is my thinking as well. Still, I wish it the best and maybe someone will actually care for it.
peterhewett
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:13:47 AM
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Not to worry Dingy It will be a Listed Building and so will be protected.
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:26:31 AM

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peterhewett wrote:
Not to worry Dingy It will be a Listed Building and so will be protected.

So they can't change it? What about basic modifications? What exactly is protected as a "listed" building? I've never heard of it before, so please, explain. Eh?
peterhewett
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:46:35 AM
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Raparee A listed building is one that has been brought to the notice of the relevant authority and given a protection order. It depends upon the grade as to what you can get permission to do. The idea is not to create a mausoleum but rather keep it as a place to live in... a living edifice. You can't just do anything you like. What you do has to be in keeping with the building and it history. I think there are at least three grades 1,2 and 3

For example you would be able to put a modern kitchen in but you may not be able to alter the exterior structure etc. You will be able to install central heating. You may temporarily block off fireplaces but will not be able to remove flues or chimneys etc etc, depending on the grade. any work done, aside from that mentioned, to the interior or exterior must be in keeping with the period. I don't know all the regs. but these are some, I think.


The url below may help a little.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listed_building
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:57:34 AM

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Peter, that is wonderful! I am very glad to hear that these sites will have to maintain a sense of period and style within reason. Thank you for the info!
peterhewett
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 1:19:18 PM
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I have just noticed what is a rare example an English Elm to the left of the building as you look face on.
Susie
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 1:27:08 PM
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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Quite an impressive manor. That could be a perfect place to arrange The Annual Freedelfian Meeting ;-)
Have to bet more in pools and lottery.

Thanks for sharing, Peter!


On a take from your comment: We should have an annual meeting of all the "family" of TFD, it would be so great to have a face to a name and some really good conversation. I'd host it at my place, but it barely holds my family. I am williny to travel thoughDancing .

AnthA1G
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 1:41:19 PM

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I surely learned something today!
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 1:41:27 PM
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In Oklahoma City ,there is a Historic Preservation Society,made up of owners of the historical buildings in down town,who zoned them for commercial developments. After adding hotels, theaters,coliseums,casinos and river-walks the property value has increased.
Today it is considered a hot spot for tourists.
oxymoron
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 2:26:18 PM
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dingdong wrote:
Susie wrote:
I think it's beautiful. The history only adds to it's beauty. I hope it's in decent shape. I think at that price, if someone bought it, they would keep it up, and maybe even add too it a bit (not that it may need anything at all.


Susie, wishful thinking; money and a sense of architectural aesthetics don't always go hand-in-hand. And at that selling price the most likely new owners are developers, celebrities or career criminals.


d'oh! No afraid not [Arabs or Russians]. I used to be a member of National Trust which look after many stately homes, [most, not all aquired through sugar tobacco and slavery by alleged original families]. If you love architechture like the house above click on the link below and be stunned at the sheer overwhelming oppulence that abounded in bygone days.

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-waddesdonmanor
Investigator
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 6:42:40 PM
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We have in the US a Historic Register by which buildings of historic significance are preserved. Even our meager 160 year history in Northern Nevada is preserved as much as possible.
kaleem
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 9:09:53 PM
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Very nice house!

michiko
Posted: Thursday, July 1, 2010 2:33:13 AM
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I really admire how Peter makes this forum so informative and easy to comprehend.
the House is simple admirable, its just that im saddened by the story behind it. its a Family Legacy! it's really worth the asking price coz its a treasure,i just hope that whoever will be able to purchase the property would be knowledgeable enough about the history behind the treasure he'll be holding with so he'll take good care of it. its good to know that it's Categorized as a Listed Building, it already has a shield.
dingdong
Posted: Thursday, July 1, 2010 7:49:14 AM
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Michiko, I remember you were located somewhere in the Middle East. Get you husband-to-be to buy this place, and then you can keep pigeons in the loft. And ... you can host the TFD get-together.
peterhewett
Posted: Thursday, July 1, 2010 9:03:34 AM
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Dongy pigeons in the loft would be pongy
rainbowflyinhigh
Posted: Sunday, July 18, 2010 4:57:58 PM
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peterhewett
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010 12:31:42 AM
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Now that is intersting. hope you get a good buyer and life continues the way you want it to.
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