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Witch Hazel Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, July 6, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
Witch Hazel

Witch hazel refers to a family of trees and shrubs found in Japan, China, and North America. They are deciduous shrubs that usually grow 10-26 ft (3-8 m) tall but can reach 40 ft (12 m). The fruit of the witch hazel is a two-parted capsule, 1 cm long, that bursts in Autumn and shoots seeds up to 33 ft (10 m) away. The plant's hard wood is used in cabinet making, and an astringent is extracted from its bark and leaves. The plant's branches have been used in what form of divination? More...
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, July 6, 2015 10:20:08 AM

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Joined: 8/10/2014
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Location: Gualala, California, United States
Wow! The deep red garden shrub cultivar "Livia" is so pretty I would like one in my yard! =*___*=
johnfl
Posted: Monday, July 6, 2015 3:29:44 PM

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Location: Newman Lake, Washington, United States
We could use lots and lots of Witch Hazel all around the yard. this might help with the animal control.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, July 6, 2015 6:04:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Witching For Water

Some say it started with Moses (Numbers 20:9-11). Some swear by the ancient Greeks. But the first written record of finding water with a forked twig is in Georgius Agricola's work, De re metallica, written in 1556.



No matter what the origin, divining or dowsing or witching for water is practiced all over the world and despite scientific ridicule, water witches still flourish today. Almost every area has a diviner or two; Wake County, North Carolina boasts more than a dozen. A few of the Wake County dowsers refer to their skill as witching (from the witch hazel, a popular divining rod of the early American settlers), but it's usually called finding a well, spotting a well, or—simply—finding water.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/witching-for-water-zmaz70ndzgoe.aspx
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