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Oldsters words and phrases Options
fred
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2009 8:17:41 PM
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What are some of the words/phrases your parents and grandparents use/used that you rarely hear anymore? These can be formal and informal.
Seeker
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 9:10:23 AM
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snuggies - elbow grease - tolerably well -
rockinmom
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 9:45:36 AM
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six of one, half a dozen of another
it's neither here nor there
don't count your chickens before they hatch
Angus
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 11:49:45 AM
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Riding Shank's mares (walking)
He doesn't have the sense to pound sand in a rat-hole.
Too bad such a pretty girl has piano legs.
Drew
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 12:06:17 PM
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Angus wrote:
Riding Shank's mares (walking)
He doesn't have the sense to pound sand in a rat-hole.
Too bad such a pretty girl has piano legs.


I've never heard these phrases before, but I think I may try to start using them because they sound hilarious.
MEFreshwater
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 1:02:22 PM
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"I love you a bushel-and-a-peck-and-a-hug-around-the-neck!"
"I swanee." (I swear)
killacasey
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 1:35:31 PM
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MEFreshwater wrote:
"I love you a bushel-and-a-peck-and-a-hug-around-the-neck!"
"I swanee." (I swear)



Bushel & a peck is from an old song.
fred
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 2:43:58 PM
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killacasey wrote:
MEFreshwater wrote:
"I love you a bushel-and-a-peck-and-a-hug-around-the-neck!"
"I swanee." (I swear)



Bushel & a peck is from an old song.




[image not available]

That's Betty Hutton and Perry Como:
doodle oodle ooh doo, doodle oodle ooh doo, Doodle oodle ooh doo, doo !
early_apex
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 4:58:51 PM
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I would just as lev go tomorrow.

He can get glad in the same clothes he got mad in.

Joseph Glantz
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 8:11:53 PM
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I miss my father's Yiddish expressions and defintions For example a schlmeil is the guy who spills the soup. A schlmazel is the guy he spills it on.
Betsy D.
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 10:43:36 PM
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Joseph Glantz wrote:
I miss my father's Yiddish expressions and defintions For example a schlmeil is the guy who spills the soup. A schlmazel is the guy he spills it on.


Now there's a whole nother topic :) Yiddish words! Go for it Joseph!! Applause
Betsy D.
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 10:44:59 PM
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Well, I'm not old enough to remember these (what a concept - something I'm too young for!), but how 'bout "the bees knees", or "the cats pajamas"...."best thing since sliced bread!"
kaliedel
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 12:44:18 AM
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Betsy D. wrote:
Well, I'm not old enough to remember these (what a concept - something I'm too young for!), but how 'bout "the bees knees", or "the cats pajamas"...."best thing since sliced bread!"


The "bees knees!" Yeah, I've heard that a few times.
Spahkee
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 4:41:14 AM
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"What's the good word?" is one I use to this day. I love seeing the confused looks I sometimes get from the younger folks, as it had me befuddled the first time I had heard it.
Christine
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 8:59:03 AM
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a bird told me

if you can't say anything nice then don't say nothing
fred
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 5:00:41 PM
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I'll fix your little red wagon.

Spic and span.

Now your cooking with gas. (yes, my thoughts exactly)
Luftmarque
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 5:25:43 PM

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Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
full as a tick
uncertain as a child's bottom
ye gods and little fishes!
(all from cha 5 of Ulysses—might as well kill two birds with one stone!)
Lynn
Posted: Thursday, April 23, 2009 2:26:46 PM
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A lot of the phrases are regional. All belong to certain time periods. Just think of the strange phrases, terms and words are now used. In 20 years, someone will hear them, and not have a clue what people are talking about! But, a couple of the phrases, like "you're cookin' with gas," "best thing since sliced bread," are still used today in some parts or the country.
Epiphileon
Posted: Thursday, April 23, 2009 4:48:36 PM

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fair to middlin
knee high to a grasshopper
sweatin puddy balls
mad enough to spit nails
wish in one hand, spit in the other, see which one fills up first
older than dirt
as old as my tongue, and six months older than my teeth.
saints preserve us
excuse the pigs, the hogs are out walkin
the last time I heard that the Dead Sea was only sick
she's so old she was a waitress at the last supper
a brand new nothin to tie on your sleeve
you'd forget your head if it wasn't attached
your cruisin for a bruisin
sailing for a wailin
stop the crocodile tears
if wishes were horses, beggers would ride
eat your dinner there are starvin kids in Africa. (I got slapped for suggesting we mail it to them)
that'll stunt your growth
busier than a one armed paper hanger
Lynn
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2009 2:42:16 PM
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"eat your dinner there are starvin kids in Africa. (I got slapped for suggesting we mail it to them)" Lol.. I didn't get slapped, but certainly got a talking down when I suggested it.

Epiphileon's list really shows a variety of time periods and regional differences. The one about the starving kids, fro example, came out during the 50's and 60's, I think. Frankly, though I never heard of some of them - and many not until I lived in the south. Many are still is use today.

Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2009 4:16:48 PM

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Lynn wrote:

Epiphileon's list really shows a variety of time periods and regional differences.

Hi Lynn, I heard all of these growing up in the 50s and 60s, in Pittsburgh, PA. My parents were both early childhood immigrants from Scotland, and veterans of WWII. Their wartime experience with people from all over the U.S. may account for the list being multi-regional. "A new nothing to tie on your sleeve", that was strictly my paternal grandmothers saying though, when I'd bug her about what she got me for Christmas' or birthdays.
fred
Posted: Friday, May 29, 2009 10:09:27 AM
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stretch of road

Are roads divided into stretches? How long is a stretch?
early_apex
Posted: Friday, May 29, 2009 8:17:47 PM
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Location: Spindletop, Texas, United States
fred wrote:
stretch of road

Are roads divided into stretches? How long is a stretch?


Isn't it a portion of highway where the road straightens out for a bit, before it kinks up again. Depending on the topography around you, all roads might be stretchin', or maybe it is just something flatlanders talk about.

Down the road just a piece refers to a distance of 2.7 kilometers. Six pieces make one stretch of road.

(NOTE: I did not find this in Wickpedia, so I had to make it up myself.)
fred
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2009 9:36:27 AM
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early_apex wrote:
fred wrote:
stretch of road

Are roads divided into stretches? How long is a stretch?


Isn't it a portion of highway where the road straightens out for a bit, before it kinks up again. Depending on the topography around you, all roads might be stretchin', or maybe it is just something flatlanders talk about.

Down the road just a piece refers to a distance of 2.7 kilometers. Six pieces make one stretch of road.

(NOTE: I did not find this in Wickpedia, so I had to make it up myself.)



You don't know who you are.
Kat
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2009 9:13:11 AM
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Sit tight.
I'll give you something to cry about.
Busier than the only bathroom at a beer drinker's convention.
Not while you're living under my roof.
Shut your pie hole.
Hanky panky
Built like a brick ----house
bugdoctor
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2009 11:59:37 AM
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running around like a chicken with his head cut off.
risadr
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2009 7:23:58 PM
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Maybe I'm the only one, but I still use a whole bunch of these on a daily basis. And I'm only 25.
early_apex
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2009 1:02:06 PM
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fred wrote:


You don't know who you are.


Does any of us?
pandacordova
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2009 3:45:28 PM
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cool beans
bob's your uncle
taste of it
I'll knock you in your puss (face)
if frogs had wings they wouldn't bump their butts

I know that there are more but I can't think of any others right now that aren't already listed.
pandacordova
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2009 5:21:40 PM
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oh yeah and here's another one

Slower than molasses in January
bugdoctor
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 9:30:58 PM
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She's about to 'jump the broom'. (to get married)
musicwriter
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2009 6:24:07 PM
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Say "cheese" (when having your picture taken by a photographer).

He couldn't cut himself out of a paper bag.

Jumpin' Jehosophat!

It's raining cats and dogs.

He/she is a snake-in-the-grass (a troublemaker).

He's getting too big for his britches

Deader than a door nail.

Cue ball, chrome dome (a bald-headed man).

Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle!

Getting down to the nitty-gritties.

Hodge-podge

Take somebody to the cleaners (in a poker game).

Money talks.

Gold mine (a successful business)

Are you pulling my leg?

Those went out with high-button shoes (obsolete for years)

Something is rotten in Denmark (seems distrustful).

I got the story straight from the horse's mouth.

Knock on wood.

Strapped (low on cash)

No dice. (it won't work/didn't work)

Shape up or ship out.

Maybe he/she has a screw loose.

On cloud nine

They've got my hands tied behind my back.

Don't let the cat out of the bag.

Raunchy (immoral, lascivious)

He/she can get under my skin.

Like rats deserting a sinking ship.

Someday, the chips will fall into place.

Working my fingers to the bone.

Slaving over a hot stove for 3 hours.

Don't get any bright ideas

Kiss it goodbye (something valuable that you lost).

He/she jumped down my throat. (vituperated face-to-face).

Hit the ceiling (get mad and lose temper).

Make a quick killing (profit).

Come hell or high water.

Quit (something) cold turkey.

What song and dance is he/she doing now?

The cowboy bit the dust. (got shot off his horse)

Beating around the bush.

Pussy-footing around.

Dyed in the wool

High faluting

Nose to the grindstone.

Nutty as a fruitcake.

Confound it!

That's money down the drain

Don't rock the boat.

Till the cows come home (like never).

Hit the nail right on the head.

Cat and mouse game.

Hoosegow, slammer (jail)

He can't bat the size of his hat. (baseball)

A cockamamie idea.

Airing out somebody's dirty laundry (spreading gossip).

Sweep it under the carpet (conceal a fact).

Drop it like a hot potato.

Heavens to Besty!

Putting the cart in front of the horse.

That's a horse of a different color (a new, uncommon thing).

Kick the bucket (die).

Bought the farm (died).

He/she has money up the yang-yang (wealthy).

The handwriting was on the wall (should have anticipated).

Flophouse (A cheap hotel where vagrants stay).

Vittles (food for cowboys in the old west).

Schnoz/schnozolla (Jimmy Durante's nose)

Schnoz box (A mail box that can be reached from a car window).

Cobbler (shoemaker).

He/she did me dirt (chastised in front of others).

He/she is over the hill (old).

Through thick and through thin

Dog-eat-dog (a ruthless, unforgiving organization).

Whopperjawed (a thing that's misaligned, lopsided, off center).

Stool pigeon (a person who looks out for the police).

Dog-eat-dog

Suds (beer)

It hit me like a ton of bricks (astonishingly realized).

Cheese box (a small, inferior piano or organ).

Sold us down the river (betrayed).

Let's get down to brass tacks (the crux of the matter).

Off the cuff (straightforward, to the point).

Talk turkey/make no bones about it (same as above).

Laughing on the outside, crying on the inside.

Green with envy.

Watered down (dwindling approval of something).

Until I'm blue in the face (trying my hardest).

Behind the 8-ball (in trouble).

Swanky (posh, elegant).

That hits the spot (delicious meal)

Peach fuzz (facial hair on a teen lad).

Spread (a dining table with plenty food on it).

Dillydally (putter around with nonvital things).

Snippet (a small sample).

The whole kit and kaboodle (all of it).

Got my foot in the door (a good start).

Proud as a peacock.

Dry as a bone.

Blind as a bat.

Straight as a die.

Wet behind the ears.

Working for peanuts.

Butterfingers! (when somebody drops something).

You silly goose!

Knee-high to a grasshopper.

He/she doesn't know beans about it.

Snow job (overemphasizing a moot point)

Stick to your guns (be resolute).

Patting himself/herself on the back)

It's on the back burner (a project that got postponed)

Catch forty winks (take a nap, snooze)

Topsy-turvy (out of sequence, confusing)

The brush-off (wants to break up dating)

23 Skidoo (get out while the getting's good)

Back to the drawing board (an idea that didn't work)

Moonlight job (a 2nd part time job)

Jump on the bandwagon (to support something/somebody that looks promising)

Tip of the iceberg

To make a long story short

She's an early bloomer

Hick town

What goes around comes around

Right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing

Been there, done that

Oh for pity's sake!

Simmer down!

Going from one extreme to the other

Get the jist of it

Off the bat (do something well immediately)

A gravy job (little responsiblity or accountability)

Keeping up with the Jones'

Gung ho (enthusiastic)


























Babezy
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2009 6:34:27 PM
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I'll be there in two shakes of a lamb's tail (or just "two shakes"). Drool
Geeman
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2009 7:14:03 PM

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Well, in addition to any number of terms now considered racist, I used to hear

"groovy"
"scratch" for money.
"cat" to describe a person.
"dig" as in "dig it" where people say "cool" more often now.
"turkey" as a mildly insulting term for a person.
"bum" or "bum-bum" for buttocks.
"kid" as a term of endearment. "Here's looking at you...."
"dame" for woman.
"broad" for woman.
"secretary" for administrative assistant.
TB
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2009 8:18:02 PM
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Location: America
outta the frying pan and into the fire
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