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prolixitysquared
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2009 6:27:14 PM
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Joined: 3/16/2009
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Location: pennsylvania.
What are some of the very first memories you have of learning to read and trying to understand the ways of English, or whatever your first language was, if it wasn't English ?

One thing I remember being so bizarre was the silent 'e.' It boggled my mind in first grade to have this letter on the end of a word, and you are never to hear it said when you speak the word. Examples off the top of my head-- hate, ate, abate. I'm on an awful rhyming spree !

Another thing I remember learning and finding so strange was the pronunciation of the name 'José.' I just couldn't understand for the life of me, at age six, why the letter 'j' would be pronounced as an 'h.' I probably found this so misleading because my first name begins with a 'j,' and given that I knew how to pronounce it, throwing in an 'h' for the 'j' just seemed so off.
Spahkee
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2009 7:44:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/2/2009
Posts: 36
Neurons: 104
Location: United States
I'll never forget the day a Children's Dictionary and "A Light in the Attic" had arrived by mail for me. I was so pleased to find out I had won a raffle at a public halloween event.

Those two books alone had changed my world irrevocably, and to this day, my most fondest memories were of learning to use the pronounciation key, discovering new words, and giggling at the guy that forgot to put on his pants.

Now had I only paid attention in class and learned my grammar lessons better...
cleopatra clover
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 12:40:59 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/15/2009
Posts: 324
Neurons: 999
Location: Malaysia
Having English being my second language....
Back during my early days when I was in school, I had difficulty to understand 'the whole language'!
At first, it was difficult for me to even to understand what my teacher said. I always pronounced and spelled wrongly.
But enventually, I managed to learn to speak and write correctly though not perfectly.
Even now, my work doesn't need a lot of written English since practically, we only use our national language.
But I do try to speak more English when interacting with our customer or the public and even my children.
Reading a lot really helps...And this 'forum' really helps a lot too.
kaliedel
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 1:10:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 340
Neurons: 1,029
Location: United States
Besides the seemingly-universal love for Shel Silverstein (my personal favorite was The Giving Tree), my first memory of language, reading, and comprehension was Dr. Seuss.
Luftmarque
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 2:20:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/17/2009
Posts: 3,119
Neurons: 39,962
Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
I had a little psychotic break after reading "Gerald Mc Boing Boing," which started as a cartoon inspired by Dr Seuss (Gerald Mc Boing Boing cartoon), then became a book later (Gerald Mc Boing Boing book at Amazon). For some reason, I decided to try it out in real life. They were not amused at Sunday School.
Rhondish
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 9:00:57 AM
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Joined: 3/20/2009
Posts: 256
Neurons: 787
Location: NH - United States
I was lucky having a sister two years older than me. When she came home from kindergarden, she would "play school" with me. Reading and writing never became a task for me, I had always associated them with fun. My fondest memories are of reading (Dr Suess,then the 1st and 2nd Grade Scholastic Readers if any of you recall these color coded learning modules) and rocking(we had twin rocking chairs, mine was child sized)in the kitchen with my mom while waiting for my sister to come home from school.

I had great difficulty with my 1st grade teacher because I was reading and writing at the 2nd Grade level. The reading didn't create too many waves but the handwriting did. I could write my full name in cursive and this was unacceptable to her as the other students could not. My brilliant 6 year old response - "But I can!".

I am not a parent, and the students I tutor are in high school. I have a question. Are Phonics and the Scholastic Reading Modules still a part of pre-school and elementary school curricula? I recall "Hooked on Phonics" being sold via magazines and the TV, but do not recall hearing about either of these for over a decade.
franziska
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 9:57:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2009
Posts: 54
Neurons: 211
Location: Genova, Liguria, Italy
Rhondish wrote:
Reading and writing never became a task for me,I had always associated it with fun.


Me, too. I distinctly remember (I must have been not older than four) when a group of meaningless twisted lines on a page suddenly turned into a meaningful sentence, a verse of one of my favourite nursery rhymes. I was astonished, it was as if a magician had conjured a real object out of thin air...
risadr
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:36:39 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,155
Neurons: 3,545
Location: PA, United States
I have absolutely no recollection of learning to read. I know that my mother used to read to me on a daily basis, beginning before I started talking (at 9 months old), and I know (from what my parents have told me) that I was reading before my third birthday. I was writing before I was four.

My favorite books have always been Shel Silverstein (I'm another The Giving Tree lover, kaliedel) and Dr. Suess, as well.

Rhondish wrote:
Are Phonics and the Scholastic Reading Modules still a part of pre-school and elementary school curricula? I recall "Hooked on Phonics" being sold via magazines and the TV, but do not recall hearing about either of these for over a decade.


My mom used "Hooked on Phonics" to help my dyslexic brother learn to read and recognize letters when he was in kindergarten, almost 20 years ago. I've seen commercials on tv since then, mostly in the past couple of years, and I know that the "Hooked on Phonics" teaching supplies are sold in educational supply stores. And Scholastic is definitely still around! The Scholastic Reading Modules are used, at least in Florida, in kindergarten and first grade classes (and possibly higher grades) to teach reading fundamentals. I can only say this with certainty, because I interviewed for a position with Scholastic in Orlando, FL as a proofreader for their "Reading Modules" texts. (I ended up not accepting the position, though, for a variety of reasons.)
Galad
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 12:58:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2009
Posts: 2,582
Neurons: 10,532
Location: Boston, Massachusetts, United States
I too have no true recollection of my reading beginnings. But my mom says I'd always have some type of reading material with me on the potty. To this day, I can't sit there without something to peruse. I do recall "Highlights Magazine" for kids. I guess reading is my laxative.......
prolixitysquared
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 6:20:57 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,035
Neurons: 3,101
Location: pennsylvania.
Rhondish wrote:
I was lucky having a sister two years older than me. When she came home from kindergarden, she would "play school" with me. Reading and writing never became a task for me, I had always associated them with fun. My fondest memories are of reading (Dr Suess,then the 1st and 2nd Grade Scholastic Readers if any of you recall these color coded learning modules) and rocking(we had twin rocking chairs, mine was child sized)in the kitchen with my mom while waiting for my sister to come home from school.

I had great difficulty with my 1st grade teacher because I was reading and writing at the 2nd Grade level. The reading didn't create too many waves but the handwriting did. I could write my full name in cursive and this was unacceptable to her as the other students could not. My brilliant 6 year old response - "But I can!".

I am not a parent, and the students I tutor are in high school. I have a question. Are Phonics and the Scholastic Reading Modules still a part of pre-school and elementary school curricula? I recall "Hooked on Phonics" being sold via magazines and the TV, but do not recall hearing about either of these for over a decade.


I'm not sure about the Scholastic Reading Modules. I know the name of the company from elementary school, but I don't remember what the modules were. I'll look them up later and let you know if I recognize them. My elementary school days were back in the 1990s about an hour outside of Philadelphia.

I just remember the "Hooked on Phonics" stuff from television too. And that motto-- "Hooked on Phonics worked for me !"
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