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The Bird Of The Morning Sings Options
chitta chatta
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 10:42:25 PM
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Joined: 2/22/2010
Posts: 407
Neurons: 1,183
Location: Australia
It is the start of our Australian winter months here. Our windows are closed and gone is the dawning cacaphone of those rooster-watchmen who are too cold to crow. Migrating elsewhere, is the chorus of the morning birds in celebration of the coming of a new day, whilst the cicardas slumber sleepily through the cold. I hope you enjoy the words of this famous Indian poet.


The Bird Of The Morning Sings.

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941)

Whence he has the word of the morning before
the morning breaks, and when the dragon night still
holds the sky in it's cold black coils?

Tell me, bird of the morning, how, through the
two-fold night of the sky and the leaves, he found
his way into your dream, the messenger out of the east?

The world did not believe you when you cried,
'The sun is on his way, the night is no more.'
O sleeper, wake!
Bare your forehead, waiting for the first blessing
of light, and sing with the bird of the morning in glad faith.
Shelley
Posted: Thursday, May 27, 2010 1:03:43 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 3/28/2009
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Location: South Africa
Thank you chitta chatta; that's a glorious poem and I love to find new poets. Your words are beautiful, too. A poet yourself?
peterhewett
Posted: Thursday, May 27, 2010 3:21:59 AM
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Joined: 5/15/2009
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Location: In my head
Yes I too enjoyed that poem. I have never heard of the poet.
chitta chatta
Posted: Thursday, May 27, 2010 6:26:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/22/2010
Posts: 407
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Location: Australia
Shelly said: ... a poet yourself? C/c says: No, only in an amateurish way. But I do have a love for poetry and words.

Peter said: I have never heard of the poem. C/c says: It's from a book of anthology, taught in our schools. I hope to add some others; occasionally. I'm very glad to know you both enjoyed it, as much as I do.

Quote from book: Rabindranath Tagore is one of India's best-known poets, and was the first Indian poet to tour the world. The question he is asking himself is, "how do birds always seem to know it would soon be day, when the sun has still no signs of rising". Something I have also occasionally pondered when they wake me too early.
Chhokri
Posted: Thursday, May 27, 2010 12:27:42 PM
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Location: Canada
Rabindranath Tagore is also a Nobel laureate!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabindranath_Tagore
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Friday, May 28, 2010 4:24:54 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/31/2009
Posts: 3,729
Neurons: 7,777
Location: here and there
Indeed he was. Peter, I am surprised being a teacher of English poetry and literature you did not know about Rabindranath Tagore.
And especially since you seem to nurture a keen interest in India.

Some of his credentials from wiki:

As author of Gitanjali and its "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse"

the first Asian to win the Nobel Prize in Literature

He was a mesmerizing representative of the Indian culture whose influence and popularity internationally perhaps could only be compared to that of Gandhi, whom Tagore named 'Mahatma' out of his deep admiration for him.

an Indian Bengali polymath. He was a popular poet, novelist, musician, and playwright who reshaped Bengali literature and music in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Tagore denounced the British Raj and supported independence. His efforts endure in his vast canon and in the institution he founded, Visva-Bharati University. (in Shantiniketan, a most beautiful place for studying where education is received on nature's lap)


Tagore was perhaps the only litterateur who penned anthems of two countries: Bangladesh and India: Amar Shonar Bangla and Jana Gana Mana.

In 1915, Tagore was knighted by the British Crown. He later returned his knighthood in protest of the massacre of unarmed Indians in 1919 at Jallianwala Bagh.

In the early 1930s, he targeted India's "abnormal caste consciousness" and untouchability. Lecturing against these, he penned untouchable heroes for his poems and dramas and campaigned—successfully—to open Guruvayoor Temple to Dalits


To the end, Tagore scrutinized orthodoxy. He upbraided Gandhi for declaring that a massive 15 January 1934 earthquake in Bihar—leaving thousands dead—was divine retribution brought on by the oppression of Dalits.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabindranath_Tagore



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Movies on Kaviguru's works have been made by Satyajit Ray, for example 'postmaster'. Many of his works have been translated in English also.

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chitta chatta
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2010 5:49:08 AM
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Joined: 2/22/2010
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Location: Australia
kisholoy: I am a "grazer" poet. Even if you were to ask me all the poets in my own country, I could not answer. I chose this wonderful poem because it came from a standard high-school, anthology study-book called "This World" - not because I am a professional. Even if I were, (and just like Peter) it would be impossible for me to be aware of every single poet in the whole world. And, I am pleased the talent of this man is more widely known now to others. He sounds like a true altruist of his people. Casually, I will be adding more poetry as I find most poetry is a "contemplative" subject with so many different genre's; and often hiding deeper meanings.
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2010 5:54:09 AM
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chitta chatta wrote:
kisholoy: I am a "grazer" poet. Even if you were to ask me all the poets in my own country, I could not answer. I chose this wonderful poem because it came from a standard high-school, anthology study-book called "This World" - not because I am a professional. Even if I were, (and just like Peter) it would be impossible for me to be aware of every single poet in the whole world. And, I am pleased the talent of this man is more widely known now to others. He sounds like a true altruist of his people. Casually, I will be adding more poetry as I find most poetry is a "contenplative" subject with so many different genre's.


For someone who has been so long in the field of literature and even teaches it, it is a surprise that a nobel winner is not known to Peter.

And he is not just any nobel laureate, CC. He is not known now to others, CC. He has always been. He is the author of the national anthem of India and Bangladesh. That is a bad miss for someone who has been teaching literature for so long and also for someone who says he takes interest in India, it can't be denied.
R Tagore has met the likes of HG Wells in his life and he has been quite popular in the world of literature and poetry.
It is like being a teacher of Physics and not knowing the name of Marie Curie.
Lady Penelope
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2010 6:11:02 AM
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Joined: 2/28/2010
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Location: United Kingdom

A lovely poem CC, but here the summer is just about to start and we have the dawn chorus to start the day.
peterhewett
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2010 11:02:19 AM
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Joined: 5/15/2009
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Location: In my head

It is not possible to know everything and Rabindranath Tagore is not that well known outside India. I am pretty sure I could quote some really good English poets and you would not know of them

Tagore's poem is ok, but not a great example of poetry in my view... perhaps something is lost in the translation. Noble prize winners are two a penny and sometimes the 'real' people get overlooked. I not one to be star struck by labels.


I was teaching in an International School as a guest once, and a young Thai/Indian girl wrote a poem which I consider to be much better the Tagore's. I have it somewhere and will try to find it.

I am not keen on much of the literature I have seen from India, although Ui have not read that much, since I am not keen on the overuse, at times, of mysticism. But there.... 'one man's meat is another man's poison'
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2010 11:17:14 AM
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peterhewett wrote:

I am pretty sure I could quote some really good English poets and you would not know of them


I am not supposed to know any. I am not even a literature student. Let alone a teacher.
chitta chatta
Posted: Wednesday, June 2, 2010 2:52:06 AM
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Joined: 2/22/2010
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Location: Australia
c/c says: I think the point being overlooked is that this was not only about his simple pleasure of the wakening of the new day, but of this man's deep faith, and in "who" is irrelevant because he expresses his respect in someone/something greater than himself. I loved it. And, I don't think anyone can be expected to know everything.. if you did, you might be so frightened "you won't wanna get outta bed".
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