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Which should i say? Options
namratha.a.r
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 5:45:58 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/21/2010
Posts: 3
Neurons: 9
Location: India
In/At
Do you live in / at Bluberry Apts
I've got a flat in / at Bluberry Apts
Meet me in / at the shopping mall in an hour
I studied in / at The Modern High School , Warwick University

Noise/Sound
My shoes make this funny sound / noise when they're wet/damp
Don't make a loud noise / sound when you enter the room
They talked so noisely
They were talking noisely

Problematic
Today is / was a problematic day
She is a problematic child/person
He is such a problem
Maths is my problem area

At/By
They were bewildered at her/by statement/way of thinking/behaviour
He was shocked at/by her behaviour
We don't have any one by/with that name

Stays/Lives
Difference bet. “She stays with her mother” & “She lives with her mother”. Does "stay" mean temporary and "lives" permanent?

Near/In/On
My house is near RL lane
My bungalow is on/in SW street
I live down this lane/on this street
My apartment is on that road/near that road(by-lane)
This is where he lived in
Don't walk in/on the driveway
in/on the campus
in/on a sprawling area of
RARA
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 7:06:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/10/2009
Posts: 661
Neurons: 2,097
Location: Portobello on the Isle of the Great Brits
I've gone through each one, hope it is clear...

In/At
Do you live at Bluberry Apts
I've got a flat in Bluberry Apts
Meet me at the shopping mall in an hour
I studied at The Modern High School , Warwick University

Noise/Sound
My shoes make this funny sound / noise when they're wet/damp, you can say either
Don't make a loud noise when you enter the room
They talked so noisely
They were talking noisely

Problematic
Today is / was a problematic day, either depending on whether the day is over or not, i.e Today is a problematic day, said at noon, today was a problematic day said at 6pm
She is a problematic child/person
He is such a problem
Maths is my problem area

At/By
They were bewildered by her statement / by or at her way of thinking/by or at her behaviour
He was shocked at/by her behaviour, either
We don't have any one by/with that name, either

Stays/Lives
Difference bet. “She stays with her mother” & “She lives with her mother”. Does "stay" mean temporary and "lives" permanent? yes

Near/In/On
My house is near RL lane
My bungalow is on SW street
I live down this lane/on this street, either
My apartment is on that road/near that road(by-lane), depends where it actually is
This is where he lived
Don't walk on the driveway
on the campus
on a sprawling area of [/quote]
dingdong
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 11:32:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/7/2010
Posts: 1,139
Neurons: 3,370
Location: Philippines
By the way, it's noisily
worldsclyde
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 2:05:47 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/24/2010
Posts: 785
Neurons: 2,390
Location: Spokane, WA USA
another "by the way", say "math", not "maths".
mangchilo
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2010 11:06:55 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/31/2010
Posts: 5
Neurons: 18
Location: United States
worldsclyde wrote:
another "by the way", say "math", not "maths".


Actually, I believe that "maths" is perfectly acceptable outside of North America. I've seen it many times from Brits, Aussies, and Singaporeans, though it sounds very strange and wrong in American English. From the use of the word "flat," saying "maths" seems the right choice for the main dialect the OP seemed to be using.

Unfortunately, I think the selection of a lot of these words depends on the speaker's dialect, and (more fortunately) many of the word pairs work either way for me. Here's how I would say them (American English):

In/At
Do you live in Bluberry Apts?
I've got [an apartment] in Bluberry Apts.
Meet me in / at the shopping mall in an hour. --Either works for me, but if I say "in," I mean specifically inside, while "at" could mean either inside or outside of the mall.
I studied at The Modern High School, Warwick University.

Noise/Sound
My shoes make this funny sound / noise when they're wet/damp --Both pairs work for me with either word.
Don't make a loud noise / sound when you enter the room. --Either way is fine here, too.
They talked so noisely[sic]. --Sound fine to me, but should be spelled "noisily," as another poster has pointed out.
They were talking noisely[sic]. --Also fine, minus the minor spelling error.

Problematic
Today is / was a problematic day. --To me, the choice of word depends on whether the day is seen as still very much in progress with plenty of potential to get still more problematic (it still is a problematic day), or is being described in retrospect near the end of the day (it was a problematic day, but I think that the problematic part of the day is over now).
She is a problematic child/person. --It depends very much on the age of the person in question. If he or she is an actual child, then I would nearly always say "She is a problematic child," but in the case of a teenager or adult, I would definitely say "person," since the word 'child' clearly does not apply.
He is such a problem. --Fine.
Math(s) is my problem area. --Fine in British English and several other dialects. It's fine in North American dialects if you just take away the 's' in "maths."

At/By
They were bewildered at her/by her statement/way of thinking/behaviour. --I think both are fine, but I would say "by," generally.
He was shocked at/by her behaviour. --Same thing as the previous one.
We don't have anyone by/with that name. --Write "anyone" as one word, first of all, and either "by" or "with" is fine, but I would usually say "with," personally.

Stays/Lives
Difference bet. “She stays with her mother” & “She lives with her mother”. Does "stay" mean temporary and "lives" permanent?
--Lives does sound somewhat more permanent, yes.

Near/In/On
My house is near RL lane. --Fine.
My bungalow is on/in SW street. --In American English, this one is always "on."
I live down this lane/on this street. --Either one works, but "on this street" is more common in North America.
My apartment is on that road/near that road(by-lane). --Well, it depends on whether it's actually on the road or just near it. In the context I think is being used here, though, I think it's pretty much always "on" in American English. "Near," to me, makes it sound like the apartment is on another street that's near the road I'm talking about rather than along that same road. Americans might also say it's "off of that road" if the apartment is more or less along that road but set back from it a ways.
This is where he lived (in). --In American English, this sounds wrong with the word "in" at the end. It would sound perfect as just "This is where he lived." The addition of "in" sounds a bit rough and not so well-educated in American English, as if the person misspoke.
Don't walk in/on the driveway. --Either one.
in/on the campus
in/on a sprawling area of
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