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One of the signs of passing youth is the birth of a sense of fellowship with other human beings as we take our place among them. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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One of the signs of passing youth is the birth of a sense of fellowship with other human beings as we take our place among them.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:21:35 AM

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Anthropologically correct observation.
sandeep patra
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:38:35 AM

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Maturity rises with the attachment and cooperation and understanding with others.
JMV
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 4:41:06 AM

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One of the signs of passing youth is the birth of fewer hair follicles, more wrinkles, and a general sense of malaise. :-(
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 5:50:15 AM
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If you can't beat them out of ageing problem, then join them - in tight fellowship…
Wagner Douglas
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 7:39:45 AM
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I couldn't agree more.

Blunt, however, so very true.
ὁ Σκοτεινός
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 7:51:13 AM

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Sadly some people stay forever in his youth.
penguin
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 8:19:11 AM

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This is the passing of youth maturity and growth. We all know a few who remain ego-centric as children, live in conflict and never find this peace.
mudbudda669
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 9:02:27 AM

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it seems that many no matter how old they get never realize this . . .
Gary98
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 11:02:07 AM

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JMV wrote:
One of the signs of passing youth is the birth of fewer hair follicles, more wrinkles, and a general sense of malaise. :-(


More precise and easier to identify!
striker
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 11:05:06 AM
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the majority never reach that level of maturity
Victor Alexandre Berto Pereira
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:26:04 PM

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start to realize that when I turned 30 Dancing
Antwan Bonner
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:46:49 PM

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mudbudda669 wrote:
it seems that many no matter how old they get never realize this . . .
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 2:06:47 PM

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Daemon wrote:
One of the signs of passing youth is the birth of a sense of fellowship with other human beings as we take our place among them.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Well put. This is one of our better quotes of the day. Applause
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 4:03:18 PM

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This quote is from : “HOURS IN A LIBRARY ” - VIRGINIA WOOLF ON FICTION

(Virginia Woolf on Fiction is a collection of essays on the subject of imaginative narratives. Virginia Woolf never went to university – in fact she hardly even went to school in the sense we think of formal education today. Yet she had a superb education – largely via free access to her father’s library in which he encouraged her to browse. From this she gained not only a first-hand acquaintance with the literary classics, but a love of books and an appreciation of the sheer pleasure of reading. She also studied languages – including Latin and Greek.
She went on to become a pivotal figure in the development of the modernist novel, and her collected non-fiction essays now stand at six large volumes. In fact she published her first writing as book reviews in the Manchester Guardian and the Times Literary Supplement. She also cultivated the discursive essay as a literary form, and this collection testifies to both the wide range of her erudition and her sharp insights into the nature of fiction as a practising novelist.
The first essay ‘Hours in a Library’ (Times Literary Supplement, 1916) deals with the pleasures of reading and the distinctions to be made between classical and contemporary writers. Not surprisingly, her sympathies lie largely with the traditional – for good reasons
)

“HOURS IN A LIBRARY ”

But these lists are curious documents, in that they seem to
include scarcely any of the contemporary writers. Meredith
and Hardy and Henry James were of course alive when this
reader came to them, but they were already accepted among the classics.
There is no man of his own generation
who influences him as Carlyle, or Tennyson, or Ruskin
influenced the young of their day. And this we believe to be
very characteristic of youth, for unless there is some ad-
mitted giant he will have nothing to do with the smaller
men, although they deal with the world he lives in. He will
rather go back to the classics, and consort entirely with
minds of the very first order. For the time being he holds
himself aloof from all the activities of men, and, looking at
them from a distance, judges them with superb severity.

Indeed, one of the signs of passing youth is the birth of a
sense of fellowship with other human beings as we take our
place among them.
We should like to think that we keep
our standard as high as ever; but we certainly take more
interest in the writings of our contemporaries and pardon
their lack of inspiration for the sake of something that brings
them nearer to us. It is even arguable that we get actually
more from the living, although they may be much inferior,
than from the dead. In the first place there can be no secret
vanity in reading our contemporaries, and the kind of
admiration which they inspire is extremely warm and
genuine because in order to give way to our belief in them
we have often to sacrifice some very respectable prejudice
which does us credit. We have also to find our own reasons
for what we like and dislike, which acts as a spur to our
attention, and is the best way of proving that we have read
the classics with understanding.

https://archive.org/stream/graniterainbowes00wool/graniterainbowes00wool_djvu.txt
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Friday, May 22, 2015 11:46:50 PM

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Excellent thought and of course, very true.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Friday, May 22, 2015 11:46:51 PM

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Location: Apache Junction, Arizona, United States
Excellent thought and of course, very true.
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