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Miguel Hidalgo (1753) Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Miguel Hidalgo (1753)

A national hero in Mexico, where the state of Hidalgo bears his name, Miguel Hidalgo was a priest and revolutionary leader who is regarded as the founder of the Mexican War of Independence movement. Influenced by the French Revolution, he launched a revolt against Spain in the early 19th century. Hidalgo led the rebels to several early victories but was captured, defrocked, and executed by firing squad along with other revolutionary leaders in 1811. What was done with their remains? More...
Shirlene Zhu Xinjie
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 7:54:38 AM

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Happy Birthday, sir!
Shirlene Zhu Xinjie
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 7:56:29 AM

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Drool Lol
striker
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 9:11:19 AM
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the word hidalgo in the spanish language i beleive is a reference to royalty
Gary98
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 9:41:11 AM

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happy birthday, Miguel!
FounDit
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 10:04:17 AM

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striker wrote:
the word hidalgo in the spanish language i beleive is a reference to royalty


From what I have read, it isn't royalty so much as nobility.

I read somewhere that Hidalgo is a contraction of "hijo-a de algo", which literally translates into English as "son/daughter of something". It loses a lot in the translation. I suppose the word "something" would be akin to our use of "That's something!", to indicate a special characteristic.

The word itself, however, is supposed to convey the sense of nobility.
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 2:16:16 PM
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"hijo-a de algo" as opposed to hijo-a de nada? Think which has no contraction?
johnfl
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 4:11:33 PM

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"VIVA REVOLUTION" change is necessary for growth!
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