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Daemon
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
sentient

(adjective) Endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousness.

Synonyms: animate

Usage: The living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage.
Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 12:48:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2014
Posts: 1,675
Neurons: 478,043
Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran

Only where there is sentient life can there be feelings of pleasure and pain, sorrow or joy.
Max Heindel
Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 12:50:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2014
Posts: 1,675
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Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran

From Graham Greene, I learnt how to be an accessible writer who grapples with our doubts as sentient individuals.
Douglas Kennedy
Shamshad Ali Afridi
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 1:18:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/17/2014
Posts: 178
Neurons: 94,307
Location: Peshāwar, North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan
With a sense of perception and consciousness (sentient) how can u be a puppet?Eh?
Irma Crespo
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 2:42:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/24/2014
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Location: Panamá, Panama, Panama
SENTIENT.- sensible; suceptible; receptive, impresionable, impressive, impressible; perceptive, conscious, cognizant, aware, sensitive to, alive to. Science has only considered human beings as sentient.
JUSTIN Excellence
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 5:20:11 AM

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Joined: 6/25/2014
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Location: Veinau, Baden-Wuerttemberg Region, Germany
Since with the dead we cannot share them ... in the sentient remembrance shall they be left... these young shoots of our hill!







2cool4school
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 5:52:18 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/10/2015
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Neurons: 8,335
Location: Eunos, Singapore
HI!New word that I have never known!Boo hoo!
Wagner Douglas
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 7:01:55 AM
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Posts: 78
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Location: São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Urban Dictionary:

sentient
The state of consciousness whereby the individual has that quality which make him capable of questioning his existence.
Human beings are sentient creatures.
Suranjeet
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 7:37:29 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/24/2015
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Neurons: 1,219
Location: Vadodara, Gujarat, India
Living beings but left behind the contemporary times by circumstances.
striker
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 8:44:08 AM
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Joined: 5/30/2014
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Location: Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States
my sentient life is doing fine and i'm alive
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 9:46:56 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/5/2014
Posts: 1,016
Neurons: 156,985
Daemon wrote:
sentient

(adjective) Endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousness.

Synonyms: animate

Usage: The living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage.



All sentient existence (plants, animals, insects, humans) must be respected...
johnfl
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 3:51:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/1/2014
Posts: 836
Neurons: 432,383
Location: Newman Lake, Washington, United States
WITHOUT SENTIENT IS LIKE A FLOWER WITHOUT SUN.
monamagda
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015 5:01:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Notes: Sentient does not mean "conscious of oneself or one's existence", as it is sometimes used. This meaning is not completely correct, as the definition shows. Rather, this nice Word refers to an acute consciousness of everything around you that causes sensation: sight, sound, taste, smell, feel. The adverb, of course, is sentiently, and the noun sentience is used far more frequently than sentiency, though both are available.

In Play: The basic meaning of today's Word refers simply to the perception of stimuli: "Andover Hand's frost-bitten toe was numb, but the others were painfully sentient of the cold." Andover would also be sentient of the cold in this word's second meaning, "conscious". Sentient can also mean acutely sensitive or conscious: "I was sentient of some tiny movement in the room, as though a mouse had shuffled just slightly in the corner."

Word History: Today's word comes from the Latin stem sentient- "sensing", the present participle of sentire "to sense, perceive". The same verb is at the root of English sentence and what a sentence expresses, a sentiment. The logical cognate of the original Proto-Indo-European root in English would be send. If the original meaning of the root were something like that of send, there must have been a time long past when sensations were interpreted as things sent to us and captured by our senses.

http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/sentient
Dinos Constantinou
Posted: Saturday, April 25, 2015 6:23:26 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/18/2015
Posts: 24
Neurons: 659
Location: Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
monamagda wrote:
Notes: Sentient does not mean "conscious of oneself or one's existence", as it is sometimes used. This meaning is not completely correct, as the definition shows. Rather, this nice Word refers to an acute consciousness of everything around you that causes sensation: sight, sound, taste, smell, feel. The adverb, of course, is sentiently, and the noun sentience is used far more frequently than sentiency, though both are available.

In Play: The basic meaning of today's Word refers simply to the perception of stimuli: "Andover Hand's frost-bitten toe was numb, but the others were painfully sentient of the cold." Andover would also be sentient of the cold in this word's second meaning, "conscious". Sentient can also mean acutely sensitive or conscious: "I was sentient of some tiny movement in the room, as though a mouse had shuffled just slightly in the corner."

Word History: Today's word comes from the Latin stem sentient- "sensing", the present participle of sentire "to sense, perceive". The same verb is at the root of English sentence and what a sentence expresses, a sentiment. The logical cognate of the original Proto-Indo-European root in English would be send. If the original meaning of the root were something like that of send, there must have been a time long past when sensations were interpreted as things sent to us and captured by our senses.

http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/sentient


This was rather interesting and the link you supplied, very useful. Thank you!
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