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If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt,... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 12:00:00 AM
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If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855)
Carmelo
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 6:41:30 AM

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Yes, For sure and absolutely.Applause
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 6:46:16 AM
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Ben Franklin tells a story about a man, his son and a horse who are walking down the street. The father is on the horse and the son is walking. A stranger says that's silly - the son should be on the horse too. So the son gets atop the horse too when another stranger says that's not good - the horse isn't strong and should only carry the lightest load. SO the father gets off and another stranger says that's silly too - the father should be on the horse. So, having tried that combination, the father and son both get off the horse when a stranger says - that's silly - one of you should be on the horse.

Franklin concludes, from the story, that whatever you do somebody is going to criticize you - so you might as well do what you think is right.
yakigirltw
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 9:10:02 AM
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hi, I'm new here. I'm wondering what this sentence means, "If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends." Could anybody explain for me? Thanks a lot.
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 9:21:00 AM

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Joseph Glantz wrote:
Ben Franklin tells a story about a man, his son and a horse who are walking down the street. The father is on the horse and the son is walking. A stranger says that's silly - the son should be on the horse too. So the son gets atop the horse too when another stranger says that's not good - the horse isn't strong and should only carry the lightest load. SO the father gets off and another stranger says that's silly too - the father should be on the horse. So, having tried that combination, the father and son both get off the horse when a stranger says - that's silly - one of you should be on the horse.

Franklin concludes, from the story, that whatever you do somebody is going to criticize you - so you might as well do what you think is right.



Did nobody ask the horse for his opinion?

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Sinya
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 9:35:46 AM

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Well, I don't care about the Ben Franklin's story right now, but I do want to know the author of Today's Quote, who is Charlotte Bronte, wanted to express.

Does anybody can help me with today's quote? What's the meaning about?
"If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends."

Thank you.
man in black
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 10:50:44 AM

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Just listen to the applauses of your own conscience and forget about the rest.

look into my eyeballs, there thy beauty lies, then why not lips on lips since eyes on eyes? William Shakespeare
pi
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 10:53:15 AM
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yakigirltw,

I think it means that even if the whole world hated you because you were evil, but you in your conscience feel you are not, then probably you would have friends who would feel the same way about you.
Cat
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 11:09:38 AM

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Does it mean we are our own best friend?

Seize the day; think of all those women on the Titanic who waved away dessert. – Erma Bombeck
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 11:18:18 AM

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Cat wrote:
Does it mean we are our own best friend?


I think it means that some people are their only best friends. It reminds me of Rudyard Kipling's 'If'. It may be a sign of strength in times of hardship if you are a leader making awkward decisions but it may also mean you are stubborn and just plain wrong like Lord Cardigan.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Thinker 1
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 12:02:27 PM
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friends, with the "s" on the end makes it more than one. Being a friend to yourself is not correct by itself. But it is true. The truth is that yes, you would have friends. Even if they are animals. but not only to the animals but to all that you show yourself friendly to, most of them will be friendly back to you. Make sense?
Sinya
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 12:45:35 PM

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Thank "man in black" and "pi", I got the meaning of this quote.
Thank you!
mustabir
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 2:51:08 PM
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Location: Istanbul, Turkey
Joseph Glantz wrote:
Ben Franklin tells a story about a man, his son and a horse who are walking down the street. The father is on the horse and the son is walking. A stranger says that's silly - the son should be on the horse too. So the son gets atop the horse too when another stranger says that's not good - the horse isn't strong and should only carry the lightest load. SO the father gets off and another stranger says that's silly too - the father should be on the horse. So, having tried that combination, the father and son both get off the horse when a stranger says - that's silly - one of you should be on the horse.

Franklin concludes, from the story, that whatever you do somebody is going to criticize you - so you might as well do what you think is right.


This is an old story referred to Nasreddin Hodja - maybe one of the most well-known ones. In the original, Nasreddin Hodja, son and donkey (his famous donkey!) are the main figures of story. It implies that, whatever you do, there will always be somebody there not to approve of how you act. After all, in connection with the quote, one should know he/she is the one who can choose the rightest step for him/herself.
avatar
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 5:05:46 PM

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Joined: 1/19/2010
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The story of "The miller, his son, and their ass" was first written by Aesop Aesop (620-560 BC), and has been adapted, borrowed, and translated in very many languages.

"Be the change you wish to see in the world." (M. K. Gandhi)
odarushka
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 7:00:29 PM

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Even if you are righteous, you still can be left alone, without single friend. Although not entirely true, this quote does give some consolation :-)
Sinya
Posted: Wednesday, April 14, 2010 5:59:18 AM

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To Carmelo,

Thank you so much.
I got your clear reply, and understood the meaning of that quote now.

Excuse me for not reply yours in private, because my rank is Newbie, and limited by the Forum manager.
But you can leave me any message on my blog.

Best wish,

Sinya
yakigirltw
Posted: Wednesday, April 14, 2010 7:54:34 AM
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Joined: 4/13/2010
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Location: Taiwan
Thanks for all the explanation.
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