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dave freak
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015 4:23:18 PM
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Joined: 4/29/2013
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Good evening!

I run into the following sentence, the meaning of which I think I am not sure of.

Be a pet and get me a glass of water.

The word "pet" is associated with an animal you have at home. From the context I can deduce that the meaning of the phrase is "help me". Is it used?

Thank you,

Dave
blufire78
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015 4:34:56 PM

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Location: Shoreline, Washington, United States
hmmmm...
yes, it is used.
I think it used long time ago, I rarely hear that.
"pet" means adorable, good,
Be a pet as in be a good boy/girl and get me a glass of water.
hope that helps,
Soph
thar
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015 4:45:56 PM

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'Pet' is a term of endearment, like darling, love, dear.
It is a way of saying please, by sweetening up the other person. Or it can be patronising and taking them for granted - the dynamic would depend on the state of the relationship!

Equivalent to, without the endearment:
Could you do me a favour and get me a cup of tea, please?

Robert Imgrat
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015 5:19:47 PM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
There is sometimes, on ITV Channel, a funny advertisement with two guys sporting training clothes from the 1980s'. One of them says: ''Do not call me pet'' Think responding to a phone call received from his friend.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015 8:08:19 PM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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This term would never be used in the U.S. I think it is primarily of British origin.

Women Libbers would likely be aghast at being called pet. In fact, it was reported today on the news that a feminist professor in Boston says that simply smiling, or holding a door open for a woman, is now considered sexist.

Quote: "Chivalry is dead, at least as far as equal rights are concerned.

A new study out of Northeastern University in Boston says there are two types of sexists out there. Acts of so-called chivalry, like paying for dinner, offering up jackets and calling a women 'love' or 'dear' can be signs of "benevolent sexists," according to psychologist Jin Goh, while "hostile sexists" are those who specifically leave housework to wives and girlfriends, or wolf whistle at women walking down the street.


Story here

Show you care by treating her with no consideration or respect...Whistle
MaryWilbur
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015 8:36:12 PM

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Location: Elgin, Illinois, United States
Pet, in your sentence, is a term of endearment. I have never heard it used, but words newly used as affectionate forms of address come up all the time.
tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2015 3:12:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
MaryWilbur wrote:
Pet, in your sentence, is a term of endearment. I have never heard it used, but words newly used as affectionate forms of address come up all the time.

'Pet' as an affectionate term of address is not a new expression in British English. The Oxford Dictionary records it used in that way in 1840. A popular British television series of the 1980s was called Auf Wiedersehen, Pet.

The term is most commonly used in England in the north-east.
dave freak
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2015 3:19:28 PM
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That's why I may not have heard the phrase when living in Portsmouth. I'm sure I must have heard it, though!

Cheers!
tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2015 3:56:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
dave freak wrote:
That's why I may not have heard the phrase when living in Portsmouth. I'm sure I must have heard it, though

I spent the first eighteen years of my life in the Portsmouth area without hearing it. I first heard it when I moved to Durham.
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