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Omizutori Matsuri Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Omizutori Matsuri

Omizutori Matsuri is marked by religious rites that have been observed for 12 centuries at the Buddhist Todaiji Temple in the city of Nara, Japan. During this period of meditative rituals in the first two weeks of March, the drone of recited sutras and the sound of blowing conchs echo from the temple. On March 12, young monks on the temple gallery brandish burning pine-branches, shaking off burning pieces. Spectators below try to catch the sparks, believing they have magic power against evil. On March 13, the ceremony of drawing water is observed to the accompaniment of ancient music. More...
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 6:20:33 AM

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Omizutori has been held annually since 752. It's one of Japan's oldest festivals.
Omizutori is an annual Buddhist festival held from March 1 -14.

Each night of the festival large torches are lit outside Nigatsudo Hall at Todaiji Temple in a specular fire show. It's a brave thing to do, Nigatsudo hall is made completely of wood. More than half of Nara's temples have burned down and been rebuilt at some point in history.

The peak of the festival is after midnight when 11 special priests called the Renhyoshu draw water from the temple well between 1:30 and 2:30 AM. It's said that the well is dry the rest of the year.

The well was a gift from a god. The founder of the temple invited 13,700 gods to a ceremony. Onyu-myojin (one of the gods) was late for the ceremony. He had been out fishing. To make up for being late, he made water spring from the ground in front of the temple once a year.

The water from the well is said to have the power to heal and absolve people of their sins.

The water is used in the Dattan — a mysterious ceremony inside Nigatsudo hall. The ceremony is closed to the public and ends around 3:30 AM. Many spectators remain outside Nigatsudo for the ceremony . The priests use torches inside the hall for the ceremony and the building glows. The sound of horns and bells can be heard.

http://www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/nara-omizutori-festival
striker
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 10:52:39 AM
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japanese really beleive in tradition and prosperity
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 5:42:19 PM

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Nice.........
Dr WWWW
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 9:39:04 PM

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Todai-ji Temple Daibutsuden Hall, the world's largest wooden building

Tōdai-ji (東大寺, Eastern Great Temple),is a Buddhist temple complex, that was once one of the powerful Seven Great Temples, located in the city of Nara, Japan. Its Great Buddha Hall (大仏殿 Daibutsuden), houses the world's largest bronze statue of the Buddha Vairocana,known in Japanese simply as Daibutsu (大仏). The temple also serves as the Japanese headquarters of the Kegon school of Buddhism. The temple is a listed UNESCO World Heritage Site as "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara", together with seven other sites including temples, shrines and places in the city of Nara. Deer, regarded as messengers of the gods in the Shinto religion, roam the grounds freely.

(I find these anthropomorphic buildings a little scary.)

Rahul Goyal
Posted: Sunday, March 13, 2016 12:12:01 PM

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Nice :)
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, March 13, 2016 9:01:17 PM

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Shunie aka Omizutori



[image not available]

Photo Courtesy of Tourism Section Nara Municipal Office


The tradition of Shunie (Omizurori) is said to have started back in 752 A.D. and has been carried out nonstop ever since. On the 12th at 1:30am Omizutori, the ritual of getting water to offer to the Kannon Bosatsu starts, and every night the torch light that led the members in charge of this role goes around the corridors of Nigatsudo Hall. It is said that being touched by the falling sparks of this torch fire brings happiness and safety for the year. Weekends and the 12th are especially crowded with visitors. Visitor entrance controlled on the 12th.

http://www.jmode.com/japanguide/sakidori_mar2.html
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