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Alexander Graham Bell Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Alexander Graham Bell

Bell was a scientist and inventor. He patented the telephone in 1876 and months later sent his now-famous telephone message to his assistant, Thomas A. Watson: "Mr. Watson, come here; I want to see you." Bell also invented a device that transmitted sound in rays of light, a machine that tested hearing and detected auditory deficiencies, and an apparatus capable of locating metallic objects in the human body. This last device was hurriedly assembled in an attempt to find a bullet in whose body? More...
Samantha Betts
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 2:42:51 AM

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a great mind indeedApplause
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 8:25:10 AM
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ding! dong!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 9:00:28 AM
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Yeah - great mind, indeed. But not a particularly honest or honourable man...and certainly not the 'inventor' of the telephone.

It really gets up my nose that articles from Wiki are seriously used as references - in this case it seems almost deliberately misleading.

Even the American Congress FINALLY admitted - as late as 2007 - that 'Bell = telephone' was a bit of a porkie, so I DO find it somewhat dishonest that this fable is still being included in contemporary "reference" sites. ("http://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/jun/17/humanities.internationaleducationnews)

Not everyone realises that Wiki is merely a site for different person's opinions: they actually rely on it for 'factual' information. Instead, they're getting still getting ancient myths such as this one served as truth!

NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 9:41:15 AM

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Romany wrote:
Yeah - great mind, indeed. But not a particularly honest or honourable man...and certainly not the 'inventor' of the telephone.

It really gets up my nose that articles from Wiki are seriously used as references - in this case it seems almost deliberately misleading.

Even the American Congress FINALLY admitted - as late as 2007 - that 'Bell = telephone' was a bit of a porkie, so I DO find it somewhat dishonest that this fable is still being included in contemporary "reference" sites. ("http://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/jun/17/humanities.internationaleducationnews)

Not everyone realises that Wiki is merely a site for different person's opinions: they actually rely on it for 'factual' information. Instead, they're getting still getting ancient myths such as this one served as truth!



THANK YOU ROMANY! Applause
striker
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 9:59:39 AM
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never knew his mother and sister were deaf
mudbudda669
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 12:07:09 PM

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Hey what about Meucci ?Shame on you
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 3:47:42 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Alexander Graham Bell

Bell was a scientist and inventor. He patented the telephone in 1876 and months later sent his now-famous telephone message to his assistant, Thomas A. Watson: "Mr. Watson, come here; I want to see you." Bell also invented a device that transmitted sound in rays of light, a machine that tested hearing and detected auditory deficiencies, and an apparatus capable of locating metallic objects in the human body. This last device was hurriedly assembled in an attempt to find a bullet in whose body? More...


His metal detector invention was first used on President Garfield. Admirable that he also played the piano well.
Amazing person! Applause
Barnacle Barney Bill
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:13:11 PM

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Quote:
It really gets up my nose that articles from Wiki are seriously used as references - in this case it seems almost deliberately misleading.

I have used as reference on occasion and trusted the information. Thank you for the making me more aware of the source.
Dr WWWW
Posted: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 8:33:37 PM

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Barnacle Barney Bill wrote:
Quote:
It really gets up my nose that articles from Wiki are seriously used as references - in this case it seems almost deliberately misleading.


I have used as reference on occasion and trusted the information. Thank you for the making me more aware of the source.


I believe that the articles in Wikipedia, for the most part, are factual and informative. Many of the contributors are experts in their fields. I use it for quick background material in fields of chemistry, math, physics, medicine. It seems sufficiently trusted by TFD that one finds that many TFD entries are directly from Wikipedia. About 10 years ago several articles, starting with one in the British journal Nature (not peer reviewed) did a comparison to Encyclopedia Britannica, the result being that the two sources were found to contain a similar number of "serious errors". The controversy is thoroughly documented in a Wikipedia entry titled: Reliability of Wikipedia.

I'm not sure what opinion has to do with the material presented there. Perhaps some of the bios or historical interpretations are susceptible to bias and manipulation by those who have an axe to grind or those who have been smitten by those finely honed axes.

In the case of Bell, I am not an expert on him and perhaps the Wikipedia/TFD article fails to properly demonize the man. The article appears to present an account of the challenges to his patents without casting opprobrium or doubt on his accusers. Inventors are no more saintly than the rest of us.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 5:01:15 AM
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Dr.W -

Ah yes - but at least you KNOW that a Wiki is not a scholarly source and make the choice as to what you use it for. You KNOW it's not a valid site for use in universities or any Higher Learning institute. And you KNOW about the Encyclopedia Britannica discussions too. You can make informed choices.

What worries me is the number of people who DON'T know, and who rely on either for most - if not all - their information. Lots of people link the suffix "pedia" with "Encyclopedia" in their minds, and think it's the same thing. It becomes, therefore, a powerful tool for misinformation. As in this case.

Although the article states that he took out the patent, it is written in such a way as to suggest to anyone that he was the "inventor" of the telephone. No mention whatsoever is made of Meucci - as someone said above. Yet for at least the past 15 years these two names have been intertwined in any serious history book. This isn't an attempt to 'demonize' the man: it's merely an accurate representation of history.

As to what "opinion" has to do with it: well any article which is not rigorously researched and subjectively peer-reviewed IS only an opinion, isn't it? One made without all the facts. In your fields you may come across experts in their fields writing for Wiki, but in my fields I have yet to do so. In fact, one article I came across concerning Margaret Cavendish, was written by a woman who is known, through peer-review, to be completely biased to the point of total unreliability.

It saddens me that with the incredible tool of the Internet available to such large numbers of people; with information once confined to University libraries now freely disseminated; with the almost unlimited scope of all the worlds greatest scholars and experts constantly to hand, the first page of almost any search now is made up of Wiki references and so many people see them as authoritative that they never even bother to go to the sites/sources given on following pages.

Thus, in the year 2015, when even the American Congress recognises Meucci, 9 out of 10 people will come away from reading the article above convinced of the myth that Bell 'invented' the telephone.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:10:32 PM

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Thank you Mr. Bell (I think) but some days I really wish you hadn't invented this very bothersome device.................. :-) :-(
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:10:32 PM

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Thank you Mr. Bell (I think) but some days I really wish you hadn't invented this very bothersome device.................. :-) :-(
Romany
Posted: Thursday, March 5, 2015 10:05:34 AM
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"Thank you Mr. Bell (I think) but some days I really wish you hadn't invented this very bothersome device.................. :-) :-( "


I rest my case!
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