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thorx89
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 5:08:11 AM
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Location: Czech Republic
~ a British word for ass. :D

I was wondering if Americans are able to tell which one of these an Englishman is saying.
They don't pronounce the r anyway, so these two might just be different spellings for the same word, right?
vr091073
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 6:04:57 AM
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Location: Mauritius
thorx89 wrote:
~ a British word for ass. :D

I was wondering if Americans are able to tell which one of these an Englishman is saying.
They don't pronounce the r anyway, so these two might just be different spellings for the same word, right?


Wrong, the 'r' in 'arse' is anything but silent; it is very much articulated. Nevertheless, in certain cases, 'ass' is substituted for 'arse.' Maybe therein lies the source of this slight confusion.
Tovarish
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 6:08:24 AM
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Aussies also say arse.
An ass is a donkey, or to make an ass of yourself, or the law is an ass.
Nothing to do with your derriere.
oxymoron
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 7:33:43 AM
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Location: Bungalow, usually in garden/greenhouse
Tovarish wrote:
Aussies also say arse.
An ass is a donkey, or to make an ass of yourself, or the law is an ass.
Nothing to do with your derriere.


Spot on Tov.Applause
srirr
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 7:44:23 AM

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I second Oxy. Applause Applause Applause
Vickster
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 8:16:04 AM
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ass - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?"
arse, behind, buns, buttocks, hind end, hindquarters, keister, nates, posterior, prat, derriere, fanny, rear end, tooshie, tush, seat, fundament, backside, bottom, rump, stern, tail end, tail, rear, bum, can, butt

Since looking this up in the dictionary... I think I will start calling my Gluteous Maximus an arse from now on....

"US and Canadian offensive slang sexual intercourse or a woman considered sexually (esp in the phrase piece of ass)"
thorx89
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 9:13:39 AM
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Location: Czech Republic
Well, it can be proved by looking it up in, let's say, thefredictionary.com that these words CAN be interchangable, and that the r CAN be silent (the second pronunciation at www.thefreedictionary.com/arse .

Anyway, the fact that both of these words are used in UK & Australia in different meanings (donkey the animal, vs your buttocks ) explains what I was trying to find out, which is if arse isn't just a British/Australian spelling of ass (with each people pronouncing it slightly differently). :-D

Thanks for replies.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 9:21:37 AM

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(_!_)

Luftmarque
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 9:42:13 AM

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Thx for the image worth a thousand words JJ. I am reminded of the time a friend was able to identify where his son was learning to swear (it was his Irish baby-sitter) when he said, "I'll kick your arse from here to County Cork!"
Lady Penelope
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 9:46:41 AM
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Luftmarque wrote:
Thx for the image worth a thousand words JJ. I am reminded of the time a friend was able to identify where his son was learning to swear (it was his Irish baby-sitter) when he said, "I'll kick your arse from here to County Cork!"


Love it, my aunt used to say "I will kick your arse from here to Lands End" same but different Applause
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 9:59:09 AM

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*trying desperately to figure out how to present ass (donkey) in Ascii*
Luftmarque
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 10:17:11 AM

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Lady Penelope wrote:
Luftmarque wrote:
Thx for the image worth a thousand words JJ. I am reminded of the time a friend was able to identify where his son was learning to swear (it was his Irish baby-sitter) when he said, "I'll kick your arse from here to County Cork!"


Love it, my aunt used to say "I will kick your arse from here to Lands End" same but different Applause

The other "tell" was when my friend muttered "asshole" under his breath after being cutoff in traffic and the son added from the back seat, "right Dad, he's a fookin' asshole!"
Ellenrita
Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 2:53:38 PM
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Joined: 1/20/2010
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Location: CANADA - Toronto

The arse of a boy named Jack.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 3:19:10 AM
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Is it only me - or did anyone else take issue with the definition cited in TFD?

1. Arse as slang for sexual intercourse?
As in "They were engaging in arse."??

2. The word was taboo until recently?
It was THE only word used by the majority of people for hundreds of years. I wonder if whoever compiled that entry has ever read Shakespeare! O.K., he was considered rather vulgar. So what about Kit Marlowe, Ben Johnson - ANY early writers. Queen Elizabeth 1 used it for crying out loud. It only BECAME vulgar recently (19th Century).

Thorx - a mere quibble but...

"Ass" is the word Americans use IN PLACE OF "Arse". NOT vice versa. i.e. its not a British and Commonwealth variation of an American word - its an American euphemism for a British word.

Yeah, yeah, I know I'm sounding picky: but etymology is one of my passions and, as you'll see in the dictionary entry, its an Anglo-Saxon word with a long history
vr091073
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 4:34:10 AM
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Joined: 5/4/2009
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Location: Mauritius
thorx89 wrote:
Well, it can be proved by looking it up in, let's say, thefredictionary.com that these words CAN be interchangable, and that the r CAN be silent (the second pronunciation at www.thefreedictionary.com/arse .

Anyway, the fact that both of these words are used in UK & Australia in different meanings (donkey the animal, vs your buttocks ) explains what I was trying to find out, which is if arse isn't just a British/Australian spelling of ass (with each people pronouncing it slightly differently). :-D

Thanks for replies.


UK English is my first language, and I basically grew up in the Kingdom. So far, I have yet to hear 'arse' being pronounced with a silent 'r' by a single Briton. Of course, globalisation, or whatever was prevalent prior to it - in this peculiar case, call it pan-Anglo-Saxon interculturality or whatever - has made that, even in the Isles, 'ass' is now on occasion co-opted in situations in which 'arse' would represent a more classical usage.

As for interchangeability, I'd chime with your contention that in many, if not most, instances, these words do in fact denote the same thing.
Vickster
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 9:05:25 AM
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Location: Massachusetts, United States
If you ask me... I think it was always pronounce ARSE... until the people of Boston got a hold of it... God knows we "idiots" can't pronounce "R." Pahhk the cahh!! d'oh!
RARA
Posted: Wednesday, April 7, 2010 10:47:17 AM
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My opinion, for what it's worth is that those puritanical folks over the pond were far too conservative to say Arse with the proud British R, and watered it down by saying ass, a bit like saying sugar instead of shit.
Babezy
Posted: Wednesday, April 7, 2010 8:35:10 PM
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Location: United States
Good Heavens, RARA, are you suggesting that Americans are more reserved and buttoned-up than Brits?
RARA
Posted: Thursday, April 8, 2010 4:18:30 AM
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Location: Portobello on the Isle of the Great Brits
Babezy wrote:
Good Heavens, RARA, are you suggesting that Americans are more reserved and buttoned-up than Brits?


Hmmn, yes Angel
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Thursday, April 8, 2010 5:35:21 AM

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Joined: 9/16/2009
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Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
There was an old lady of Madras
who had a most delightful ass,
not rounded and pink
as you probably think,
but 'twas grey, hairy, n ate grass.
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