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Edgar Allan Poe Publishes "The Raven" Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Edgar Allan Poe Publishes "The Raven"

Like Poe's other works, "The Raven" conveys the dreamlike and often macabre forces that pervaded the author's sensibility. While his wife suffered from a protracted illness, Poe composed this poem, which became an instant sensation when it appeared in the Evening Mirror in 1845. In the poem, the speaker, who is mourning the death of his love, Lenore, is mysteriously visited by a talking raven and asks the bird a series of questions. What is the raven's one-word response to each query? More...
Dialectrum
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 2:01:10 AM

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If you really like Edgar Allan Poe, like I do, listen to Nox Arcana's album, "The Raven", dedicated to him.

ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 2:23:07 AM

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I was about 12 years old when I first read a short fragment from the Raven in some short-story. It was ''and the silken, said, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain thrilled me, filled me with fantastic terrors, never felt before..'' I was immediately fascinated by the music of these words. The bird in the poem really 'serves a dramatic purpose'. Dickens' Grip, however, is also a great guy, a very colorful, full-fledged character, despite the fact of his being just a bird!
Vit Babenco
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 2:32:16 AM

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“Nevermore.”
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 7:56:13 AM

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I can see how it could be criticised for being contrived, but I love the musicality of it. I used to recite it to my nieces when they were little. They'd get scared even though they didn't understand it all. I'd always cue them to when they could say the "Nevermore" bit & they stuffed it up every time with the final line of the eleventh stanza: "... Of 'Never – nevermore'...". I'd say: "Of never" & cue them, but they'd always say "-more" instead of "nevermore". I'd always get carried away with the second last stanza, my favourite.

Poe was brilliant! I challenge anyone to read The Tell-tale Heart without holding your breath. Amontillado, The Pit & The Pendulum, The Premature Burial: he could imagine horror & hold you spellbound like few other writers. Anxious
Omar Mariani
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 8:56:37 AM

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Nevermore
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 12:04:43 PM
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NeuroticHellFem wrote:
I can see how it could be criticised for being contrived, but I love the musicality of it. I used to recite it to my nieces when they were little. They'd get scared even though they didn't understand it all. I'd always cue them to when they could say the "Nevermore" bit & they stuffed it up every time with the final line of the eleventh stanza: "... Of 'Never – nevermore'...". I'd say: "Of never" & cue them, but they'd always say "-more" instead of "nevermore". I'd always get carried away with the second last stanza, my favourite.

Poe was brilliant! I challenge anyone to read The Tell-tale Heart without holding your breath. Amontillado, The Pit & The Pendulum, The Premature Burial: he could imagine horror & hold you spellbound like few other writers. Anxious


I have read the first three, and know exactly how Poe depicts the darkest sides of one's psyche...
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 1:17:28 PM

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NEVERMORE

In this poem, one of the most famous American poems ever, Poe uses several symbols to take the poem to a higher level. The most obvious symbol is, of course, the raven itself. When Poe had decided to use a refrain that repeated the word "nevermore," he found that it would be most effective if he used a non-reasoning creature to utter the word. It would make little sense to use a human, since the human could reason to answer the questions (Poe, 1850). In "The Raven" it is important that the answers to the questions are already known, to illustrate the self-torture to which the narrator exposes himself. This way of interpreting signs that do not bear a real meaning, is "one of the most profound impulses of human nature" (Quinn, 1998:441).

Poe also considered a parrot as the bird instead of the raven; however, because of the melancholy tone, and the symbolism of ravens as birds of ill-omen, he found the raven more suitable for the mood in the poem (Poe, 1850). Quoth the Parrot, "Nevermore?"

Another obvious symbol is the bust of Pallas. Why did the raven decide to perch on the goddess of wisdom? One reason could be, because it would lead the narrator to believe that the raven spoke from wisdom, and was not just repeating its only "stock and store," and to signify the scholarship of the narrator. Another reason for using "Pallas" in the poem was, according to Poe himself, simply because of the "sonorousness of the word, Pallas, itself" (Poe, 1850).

http://www.poedecoder.com/essays/raven/
striker
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 1:24:32 PM
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the raven knows
Dr WWWW
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 5:19:51 PM

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The Poe Toaster

"Poe Toaster is a media epithet popularly used to refer to an unidentified person (or more probably two persons in succession, possibly father and son) who, for over seven decades, paid an annual tribute to American author Edgar Allan Poe by visiting the cenotaph marking his original grave in Baltimore, Maryland, in the early hours of January 19, Poe's birthday. The shadowy figure, dressed in black with a wide-brimmed hat and white scarf, would pour himself a glass of cognac and raise a toast to Poe's memory, then vanish into the night, leaving three roses in a distinctive arrangement and the unfinished bottle of cognac. Onlookers gathered annually in hopes of glimpsing the elusive Toaster, who did not seek publicity and was rarely seen or photographed."

Wikipedia

"... The statement occasionally made that the identity must be known by the Poe Society of Baltimore is utterly untrue, no matter how confident may be the tone of the person stating it. Similarly, Jeff Jerome, the curator of the Baltimore Poe House and Museum, has consistently denied having any such knowledge, although he freely admits to having intentionally withheld some minor details about the event for the sake of differentiating between the “Toaster” and would-be imitators.

"... A note left for Jeff Jerome in 1993 stated somewhat cryptically that “the torch will be passed,” and another note left in 1999 indicated that the original “Toaster” had died within a few months before the annual event. After 1993, sightings of the visitor suggested two younger persons were exchanging the obligation between themselves, presumably in honor of their father. The annual visitations continued through 2009, the bicentennial of Poe’s birth, but not in subsequent years."

From the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Baltimore - Poe’s Memorial Grave
Society Website

The Baltimore Ravens football team is named for Poe's poem.
Verbatim
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2015 7:53:38 PM
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Worth $15 charity, turned down for publication. Sold for $9, later to create sensation.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:56:28 PM

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Great writing.
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