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Dream of / Dream about Options
Sona Murmu
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 12:43:49 AM

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Joined: 9/11/2014
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Location: New Delhi, NCT, India
What is the difference between "dream of" and "dream about".
Which is correct : "I dreamt of a unicorn" or "I dreamt about a unicorn"?
Sopharos
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 1:59:12 AM

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Location: Rennes, Brittany, France
Dream of (= imagine, want); example : he dreamt of becoming a teacher.
Dream about (= while sleeping); example : last night I dreamt about my friend.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 3:37:44 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello Sona Murmu.

It is true that 'dream of' can mean 'want', 'wish' - but it is also used exactly the same as 'dream about'.

Last night, I dreamt of a unicorn.
Last night, I dreamt about a unicorn.
All my life, I've dreamt of owning a Rolls-Royce.
Omar Mariani
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 5:51:17 AM

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Location: Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
Much of a muchness, same difference, essentially the same
Flagman
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 6:07:53 AM

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Location: New Milford, Connecticut, United States
"Dream of" is usually a preface to a statement which reflects something that someone hopes for, that they aspire to be, or that is a goal of theirs.
"Dream about" denotes something which someone had a dream about, a series of mental images or scenes that one experiences while they're sleeping.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 7:46:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,359
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It would appear that in some foreign parts (like France and Connecticut) the idiomatic 'dream of', meaning 'wish for', 'hope for', has become the normal meaning - submerging the real meaning used in England and Argentina.

dream v.intr.
1. To experience a dream in sleep: dreamed of meeting an old friend.
American Heritage
11. (when: intr, foll by of or about) to have an image (of) or fantasy (about), in or as if in a dream. Collins English Dictionary

2. used as a verb
When someone experiences imaginary events while they are asleep, you can say that they dream something happens or dream that something happens.
I dreamed Marnie was in trouble.
Daniel dreamt that he was back in Minneapolis.

You can also say that someone dreams about someone or something or dreams of them.
Last night I dreamed about you.
I dreamt of him every night.


When someone thinks about a situation that they would like to happen, you can say that they dream of having something or dream of doing something.
He dreamt of having a car.
I've always dreamed of becoming a writer.

Collins COBUILD English Usage.

NOTE that "Dream of" as a 'wish' or 'hope' is usually followed by the verbs 'being' or 'having'
"He dreamed of being a doctor."
"She dreamt of having a diamond necklace."
"He dreamt of having a Jaguar."
"She dreamed of being an astronaut."


When "dream of" is used to mean "have night-time mental images of", it is often followed by a noun, noun-phrase or noun-clause.
"She dreamt of a huge dragon."
"He dreamt of a unicorn."
"He dreamed of when he'd been young."
('When he'd been young' is a clause acting as a noun)
"She dreamed of a trip to Sirius."
Sona Murmu
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2014 12:08:04 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/11/2014
Posts: 4
Neurons: 46,707
Location: New Delhi, NCT, India
Thank you Drag0nspeaker! Applause
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