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risadr
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 12:03:19 PM
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Since last June, I've lost between 45-50 lbs, just by changing my eating habits. That said, I still have another approximately 20-25 lbs to lose before I reach my goal. My question is: HOW IN THE HECK DO I DO THIS?!?!

I've joined a gym and I plan on doing an hour-long cardio workout four days/week, but I'm pretty sure that's not going to be enough. Does anyone have any helpful suggestions for me?

(For what it's worth, I'm planning on adding some weight/strength training once I lose 10 more lbs.)
Raparee
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 12:11:41 PM

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Perserverance and blindly stubborn determination? Honestly, I don't know. I lost a good bit several years ago and have been stuck at that 25lb mark ever since. I've tried changing my exercise routine around, adding in new stuff just in case my body was so accustomed to what I was doing that it was no longer effective. I'm currently back on a more restrictive diet to try and get my system in order. I'm drinking water like a fish and have cut out aspartame use almost completely (it's in a lot of things, so I find it periodically, but I don't drink it much any more). But my scale says I've gone UP 2lbs. *SIGH* I'm going to give it another few weeks and see what the scales and the clothes say and if I go up again without having lost some inches (which would mean muscle gain and fat loss), I'm back to the doctor's office to figure out WHY.

Good luck, darlin. Hope you're feeling better, too. Make sure you get your sleep. The docs are always telling me you need those prized 8hrs to help you lose weight, but life does not allow this for me. Adding in weight training or higher resistance workouts and interval training will help, but remember that muscle weighs twice as much as fat, so worry more about how your clothes fit and not the numbers on the scale. And don't wait to add in the strength training. Go ahead and add it now if you can. Even if it's just lifting a 5lb bag of flour or a full 2-liter bottle. Resistance bands are good and so is using your body as resistance.
schrodinger's cat
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 1:44:35 PM
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Well, you lose weight if your calorie intake is lower than the number of calories you burn. That pretty much says it all.

DIET:
First of all, good diet is very important. That doesn't mean you need to starve yourself, you'd be amazed how much you can do just by changing small things.

-Drink water or 100% natural juices instead of juices with added sugar or any other sweeteners, green tee is also said to help (without sugar).
-Then of course you have to get rid of junk food, afternoon snacks and the likes. If you need to munch on something, fruit and vegetables is the way to go.
- Also, 4-6 smaller meals are better than 2-3 big ones. Eat just enough to get that full-stomach feeling, if you drink water prior to eating you will generally eat less. Smaller plates and portions are also good, if you're still hungry after you finish it you can also get another serving.
- A strong breakfast is said to be a good thing (if you're lucky enough to have the time) while eating before going to bed is an absolute no no. Try not to eat anything at least a few hours before going to bed.

EXERCISE:
- As for the exercise, walking or taking a bike instead of using a car, the stairs instead of elevators... 30 min a day of moderate workout is necessary for your health, but if you want to lose weight then I'd say 3-4 times a week about 1.5 h cardio workout, that's anything that gets your heart pumping.
- There's a hear rate range where you lose the most calories, I'm not entirely sure what it is, plus it also depends on the age. You can google that and you'll see- it helps if you have one of those watches that measure heart rate, but you can also do it on your own by measuring the pulse on your wrist or neck.
- Weight training is also good, but you have to be careful to take a day or two off between workouts to allow muscles to rest. You can vary the muscles groups: day 1- legs, day 2- arms, day 3- stomach, if you want to exercise every day. - However it is advisable to take a day off every now and then to allow your body to recharge and don't push yourself too hard if you get sick. Taking a couple of days off is ok. Also, don't forget about warming up and stretching, it's advisable to do it before AND after workout.

Now, if only I would be able to stick to this routine, hope you have more motivation than me. :)
Momsey
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 1:51:47 PM
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First of all, congratulations! For getting rid of those final pesky pounds, interval training is the answer. Don't waste your time with hours and hours of cardio. Look at the people around you at the gym. Speak to the people next to you on the treadmill and find out how long they have been doing the same thing, and see if you can notice a difference in their body shape. I have been going to gym for the past 10 years, and there are people who have been busting their guts, running for hours and hours on a treadmill, and they have not changed at all in 10 years! I have seen people doing interval training and losing weight and toning down in an amazingly short time. I have done it myself when I discovered the secret. Look up interval training on the web to find out what will work for you. It basically means working out at short, sharp bursts to get your heartrate up, slowing down for a short while to allow your heartbeat to come down to an slower beat and then upping the pace again. Do this for about twenty minutes at a time. It does not have to be running, it can also be doing any exercise with weights that will really tax you muscles and push up your heart rate. Use as many muscles as possible during one exercise, for instance, deep squats with weights with a full extension on the upward push and squatting down again. Pull-ups are great, using your arms to pull up your whole body weight, push-ups with an explosive jump up into the air after each push-up. Build up your stamina and don't try to do it all in one day. The great benefit of interval training is that you do not only burn calories during the exercise, but that you enable your body to burn calories right through the day. Good luck!
avatar
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 2:33:08 PM
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Am I naive in assuming that continuing whatever regimen that made you lose 45-50 lbs will continue to help you lose the next 10 lbs?

Of course, cardiovascular exercise would make it faster and benefit your heart. My question is purely theoretical.
NinjaMonkee
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 3:55:21 PM
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Location: CA. USA
diet and exercise is all you can do short of taking weight loss supplements. that last bit of weight is always the hardest to get rid of and keep off. determination and patience will pay off.
Raparee
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 3:57:18 PM

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avatar wrote:
Am I naive in assuming that continuing whatever regimen that made you lose 45-50 lbs will continue to help you lose the next 10 lbs?

Of course, cardiovascular exercise would make it faster and benefit your heart. My question is purely theoretical.

Unfortunately, the body is a tricky beast. Eventually, it will acclimate to whatever you're doing to it and the weight loss can stop. This is known as the dreaded plateau and they are a bitch to break. Generally, you need to shock the system and say, "HEY! We're not done yet!" There are also underlying causes that can make it very difficult to break plateaus. Dropping calories too low after losing 50lbs can actually send the body into starvation/survival mode, where it holds onto everything, so you generally have to change what you're eating and how you're exercising. Sounds a lot easier than it actually is.

Sometimes, it's very healthy to stay at a plateau for a while to let the body get used to its new weight and food intake. Alas, several YEARS is is frustrating as all get out. Hopefully, risa will have faster results than that. :)
avatar
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 4:33:19 PM
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Joined: 1/19/2010
Posts: 322
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Raparee wrote:
avatar wrote:
Am I naive in assuming that continuing whatever regimen that made you lose 45-50 lbs will continue to help you lose the next 10 lbs?

Of course, cardiovascular exercise would make it faster and benefit your heart. My question is purely theoretical.

Unfortunately, the body is a tricky beast. Eventually, it will acclimate to whatever you're doing to it and the weight loss can stop. This is known as the dreaded plateau and they are a bitch to break. Generally, you need to shock the system and say, "HEY! We're not done yet!" There are also underlying causes that can make it very difficult to break plateaus. Dropping calories too low after losing 50lbs can actually send the body into starvation/survival mode, where it holds onto everything, so you generally have to change what you're eating and how you're exercising. Sounds a lot easier than it actually is.

Sometimes, it's very healthy to stay at a plateau for a while to let the body get used to its new weight and food intake. Alas, several YEARS is is frustrating as all get out. Hopefully, risa will have faster results than that. :)



Thanks, Raparee.

Looks like I had "conveniently forgotten" that phenomenon.
HWNN1961
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 4:38:18 PM
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Joined: 2/13/2010
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Hi, here is what I know of this topic. I'm a pretty dedicated exercise nut, so even though weight hasn't been an issue personally, I am familiar with the issue, and have friends that have wrestled with weight problems:

Avoid extreme diets, and extreme fluctuations in your diet. If you go from one extreme to another, your body will respond to this starvation-overeating cycle by storing fat for the "lean times"...you will literally fool your system into burning muscle rather than fat! Have a Dr. advise you of what your caloric intake should be based on assessment of your age, gender, lifestyle, and metabolism. The basics are to take in fewer calories than you burn. The hard part, is, how to get there? That is answered as best I can, below:

I. DIET:

One: eat whole foods whenever possible: whole grain bread and rice. Avoid foods that are heavy in sugar and fat. Not all fat is created equal, and some is healthy: eg: substitute olive oil wherever you can.

two: make simple changes: when my metabolism started slowing down as I've aged, simple things like drinking skim milk instead of 2% or whole milk...drinking black coffee or green tea and leaving out the sugar.

-it doesn't seem like much, but, if you drink 3-4 cups of coffee each day that is 3-4 teaspoons of sugar x 365 days! I am not sure how many calories it is, but over time, it makes a difference.

three: someone else already said this, but again, eat small meals, but eat 4 or more times a day.

four: eat fresh fruits and vegetables and drink water. The fiber in fruit and vegetables will help you feel full while actually eating fewer calories at each meal. The water has the same effect. Also, if you make sure that the water is cold, your body will actually have to work to maintain internal temperature...and you will actually burn a few calories that way too, with no effort!

For example: if you have a double cheeseburger and a milkshake, you will be hungry sooner than if you had a sandwich, a salad and an apple, even though you will consume far more calories eating the burger and shake.

five: read labels: lots of those so called "diet" products, are anything but. Compare and eat the healthier choice: eg. Yogurt. Some brands are very good for you, with others you might as well be having a milkshake.

EXERCISE:

1. Add weight training! Resistance training has this amazing advantage. When you train your muscles, they are actually damaged on a cellular level (not to worry, this is how they grow). In response your body repairs the muscle fibers, and makes them stronger. This occurs for many hours after your workout....long story short: YOU CONTINUE TO BURN CALORIES AT A HIGHER RATE FOR HOURS AFTER THE WORKOUT!

2. For the health of your cardiovascular system, make sure you cycle, job, ride a stepper, anything several times a week.

3. Someone else also said this above: do the small things: don't park your car as close as you can to the door at work or when shopping...get used to walking. Take the stairs. If you need milk and eggs and the store is only blocks away, take a walk instead of driving. Another good one that I do at work: I use my break time to walk around, go outside. It wakes me up and gets the circulation flowing.


Don't expect instant results. Your dr. can say with more accuracy, but you don't want to lose more than a 2 or 3 pounds a month unless you are being strictly monitored medically.

The key: make health a lifestyle, not a quick patch. You'll keep the weight off.

One final example: as a kid, I thought diet pop was disgusting. Now it is the opposite, I like the "clean and crisp" taste of diet cola. Same with milk....as a kid it was whole milk or nothing....now, I prefer skim, and I actually don't like the smell of whole milk. It does become a lifestyle.
nooblet
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 4:46:04 PM
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Joined: 10/15/2009
Posts: 1,570
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Momsey wrote:
First of all, congratulations! For getting rid of those final pesky pounds, interval training is the answer. Don't waste your time with hours and hours of cardio. Look at the people around you at the gym. Speak to the people next to you on the treadmill and find out how long they have been doing the same thing, and see if you can notice a difference in their body shape. I have been going to gym for the past 10 years, and there are people who have been busting their guts, running for hours and hours on a treadmill, and they have not changed at all in 10 years! I have seen people doing interval training and losing weight and toning down in an amazingly short time. I have done it myself when I discovered the secret. Look up interval training on the web to find out what will work for you. It basically means working out at short, sharp bursts to get your heartrate up, slowing down for a short while to allow your heartbeat to come down to an slower beat and then upping the pace again. Do this for about twenty minutes at a time. It does not have to be running, it can also be doing any exercise with weights that will really tax you muscles and push up your heart rate. Use as many muscles as possible during one exercise, for instance, deep squats with weights with a full extension on the upward push and squatting down again. Pull-ups are great, using your arms to pull up your whole body weight, push-ups with an explosive jump up into the air after each push-up. Build up your stamina and don't try to do it all in one day. The great benefit of interval training is that you do not only burn calories during the exercise, but that you enable your body to burn calories right through the day. Good luck!


Momsey, cardio also increases your metabolism (the rate at which you burn calories), but that is a really good point. I had forgotten that I did interval training in high school. I highly recommend a mixture of both cardio and interval training, though. I typically did about two 1.5 hour-long interval/cardio workouts a week, and five 1.5-2 hour-long cardio workouts (I exercised every day).
Susie
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 5:13:33 PM
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Joined: 2/11/2010
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What worked for me was exercise and watching what I eat. Seems like you are already on that plan. What I can suggest on top of that is portion control.

I now try to eat only a portion of food that is the size of my fist. I don't starve my self, I eat healthy, but there is just so much food available here in the US, we have to start taking control.

And congrats on the current weight loss, that alone is a great task. Applause
oxymoron
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 8:39:46 PM
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Strange, I have just started my weight off regime this very day. My motivation 12 pair of trousers in my wardrobe I can't get in and a slothful feeling I hate. Scales say 242lbs,a little disgusted with myself; so my cycle came out of the shed today plan on using it every day and target is 196lbs in however long it takes. To this end am cutting sugar, booze to bare minimum, very difficult for me as I love the stuff, biscuits too, but not so good for my waistline, blood pressure, Winter is now over so here goes. If Eddy Izzard can run 47 marathons 1 a day Sunday the exception at 47 years of age for sport relief; surely I must be able to do a daily cycle ride. What would be a good starting mileage would you say?
nooblet
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 8:56:10 PM
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If you haven't exercised in a while, I'd start off with a maybe a 4 mile bike ride. The "exchange rate" between running and cycling is about 1 mile of running to 4 miles of cycling, so if you can do 4 miles off the bat, you will hopefully be able to get back into the swing of things quickly. Once you can go 4 miles, try and lengthen it a little each time. I think that targeting the 12-16 mile range would be a good goal, depending on how fast it takes you to get back into the groove, it could reasonably take anywhere from 2 months to a year to hit that goal.

I don't have much experience cycling, I only used it as a supplement for running when I had a stress fracture. Because I had many years of running competitively under my belt, I was able to jump into cycling 32 miles a day, but that is getting into the realm of competitive sports training, which you probably have no interest in. I'd say 12-16 miles of riding is a pretty good spot to be in, it'll be at least 30 minutes of exercise so you'll get the aerobic workout going. You could probably throw some interval sprinting in there as well on some days (just do spurts for a minute or two, then cycle at an easier pace, then go again for a minute or two, etc.) once you start getting into the groove. Hold off on intervals until you can cycle for 30 minutes without rest.
Lady Penelope
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 8:59:34 PM
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Well done to all of you that has kept to a regime. I am fine and full of good intentions for about two weeks than the boredom sets in and all the good work is undone.

Oxy, I would get one of those mile counters to fix on the wheel, you can then see what you feel comfortable with. Maybe aim at 5 miles to start as that is not too much on a cycle and build up from there, you should at least also make your heart work, a good thump thump and a sweat up should help, I presume you are ok with that as you already have a cycle, if not check with your doctor or the trainer at a gym.

Good luck to you all.
oxymoron
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 9:06:24 PM
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Thanks very much nooblet, think like you say, ease into the groove and hope for clement weather.

Lady P milometer a good idea, will cycle to Halfords tomorrow.
nooblet
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 9:07:19 PM
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No problem. Good luck with your training! :)
amedtychick
Posted: Monday, March 15, 2010 10:54:56 PM
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Congratulations on your weight loss thus far and best of luck for future slimming.
Meehowski
Posted: Monday, April 26, 2010 11:46:37 AM
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Awesome..........I'm losing too........
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, April 26, 2010 12:12:51 PM

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I just started a newly invented wine-diet a week ago. I've already lost three days!
Whistle
Raparee
Posted: Monday, April 26, 2010 12:27:23 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
I just started a newly invented wine-diet a week ago. I've already lost three days!
Whistle

*cackles* Applause
Mami
Posted: Friday, May 21, 2010 5:35:55 PM
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Joined: 4/21/2010
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I started an exercise routine last month and increased my workout time and intensity and it's definitely paying off!!
I've lost about 7 pounds, and I'm more toned Dancing
My ideal weight is 130, so I have about 15 pounds to go. I'm thinking about trying the P90x program...I'll update you guys if I start it...
Any one have any nutritional tips, I think I would lose weight faster, but I'm always sooooo hungry, I crave carbs d'oh!
Rice and bread...

When I was younger I was 130lbs. and wanted to be 120, now I just want to be 130 Pray
Mami
Posted: Friday, May 21, 2010 6:53:25 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/21/2010
Posts: 219
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risadr wrote:
Since last June, I've lost between 45-50 lbs, just by changing my eating habits. That said, I still have another approximately 20-25 lbs to lose before I reach my goal. My question is: HOW IN THE HECK DO I DO THIS?!?!

I've joined a gym and I plan on doing an hour-long cardio workout four days/week, but I'm pretty sure that's not going to be enough. Does anyone have any helpful suggestions for me?

(For what it's worth, I'm planning on adding some weight/strength training once I lose 10 more lbs.)


A friend of mine tried spinning and it really helped her get toned. Interval training, like other members mentioned, is really good to get out of the exercise plateau. Vary your workouts = muscle confusion, and that will help you Dancing
ssivam
Posted: Saturday, May 22, 2010 7:49:01 AM
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Location: India
I have had several fluctuations of weight over last few years. I have seen that jogging really helps.
Another important thing that most people overlook: you must have a healthy lifestyle to stay fit and in shape. I have studied about this, that if you go to bed and get up early, if you take your meals at the proper times and in optimal quantities, and if you have in general an active, happy life, chances are you will remain in shape. Alcohol, when unhappy, actually accounts for more fat and so one should avoid it in times of unhappiness, though it is at those times we usually take it, don't we??
HarveySmith
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 2:53:49 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/1/2011
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Location: australia
1. Try adding foods to your diet instead of subtracting them.
2. Working out
3. Go Walking
4. Lighten the Foods You Already Love
5. Because Hydration Helps -- Really!
6. Share and Share Alike
7. Eating less without feeling denied
8. Eat at the same times every day (including snacks).
9. Make only one meal.
10. Remember that little things add up.
jauntravels
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 8:22:41 PM
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I really need to go on diet. I'm getting married this coming december and I still have a lot of belly fats. Can anyone suggest of a diet that has a 2 months time frame??
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 8:30:27 PM

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jauntravels wrote:
I really need to go on diet. I'm getting married this coming december and I still have a lot of belly fats. Can anyone suggest of a diet that has a 2 months time frame??


Stop eating too much and go to walk for start.
claudineriddle
Posted: Friday, April 6, 2012 9:57:26 AM
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Well, in every weightloss program there are two things that go hand in hand that are exercise and diet.

Where 30% credit goes to exercise the remaining 70% is noting but the diet. You need to be very focused on your diet and should consult with your dietitian regularly.
GeorgeV
Posted: Sunday, April 8, 2012 11:39:16 PM
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I have until now never imagined I would contribute to a diet thread. I never had a need to diet, but years ago I came across the EAT book (acronym for something) and read it out of curiosity. The part I remember was about being aware HOW MUCH you eat (as JJ said above). Concentrate on the food in front of you, instead of just shoveling it while reading or watching TV.

srirr
Posted: Thursday, April 19, 2012 1:30:46 AM

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Congrats Jaun! Have little diets at regular intervals. Don't eat too much at one time. Avoid oily and fatty things. Better to have fresh fruits, roughage, juices.

And yes, exercise.
Lilian Waters
Posted: Friday, August 31, 2012 10:28:05 AM
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Hello,
I am glad to join with you. Thanks for informative information share with us. I have learned a lot of from this post. Much appreciated.
sashakta
Posted: Friday, October 12, 2012 1:14:58 PM
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Joined: 10/12/2012
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Location: India
Quote:
diet and exercise is all you can do short of taking weight loss supplements.


Guys...
You are right but in that case ( dieting and exercise) we need to good and best meal. and the best one choice should be organic food.
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, October 12, 2012 2:10:50 PM

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risadr wrote:
Since last June, I've lost between 45-50 lbs, just by changing my eating habits. That said, I still have another approximately 20-25 lbs to lose before I reach my goal. My question is: HOW IN THE HECK DO I DO THIS?!?!

I've joined a gym and I plan on doing an hour-long cardio workout four days/week, but I'm pretty sure that's not going to be enough. Does anyone have any helpful suggestions for me?

(For what it's worth, I'm planning on adding some weight/strength training once I lose 10 more lbs.)


Portion control, a varied diet, and exercise are all part of achieving a healthier body, and your weight can be a useful indicator of your progress, but sticking to arbitrary weight targets is not necessarily the best way to go.

There are several things to consider here. The intake versus activity level must of course be addressed, yet there is still a baseline of caloric and nutritional intake that must be respected in order to maintain good health.

In addition to engaging in activities that merely burn more calories, significant and more permanent results can be achieved by addressing the muscle versus fat ratio, and the overall metabolic rate.

Developing more muscle tissue itself burns more calories, even while one is at rest, so exercise routines that promote more muscle mass should be included in the overall regime. This will not necessarily result in rapid weight loss, but rather help one achieve a healthier and more sustainable weight. Keep in mind that if one's body does not take enough calories in, it will eventually begin to consume muscle mass in order to keep going, and this will work against one's goals.

It is also important to consider not only what one eats, but when one eats it. Eating fatty foods before strenuous exercise (at breakfast) is a good way to control peaks in blood sugar levels; at any other time it merely adds to the calorie intake. Eating a combination of carbs and protein immediately after a workout triggers a boost in insulin that promotes muscle building and discourages fat production.

almostfreebird
Posted: Friday, November 2, 2012 8:16:23 AM
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I like Marianne Sägebrecht.

She was fat and energetic.

She was an angel in Bagdad Cafe.




almostfreebird
Posted: Friday, November 2, 2012 8:34:26 AM
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mineralsvita
Posted: Friday, November 23, 2012 2:44:47 AM
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lemon juice as my breakfast has great effect for me..
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