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prof_question
Posted: Saturday, November 22, 2014 12:18:31 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/5/2011
Posts: 63
Neurons: 659
Location: Kharkiv, Kharkivs'ka Oblast', Ukraine
Could you help me, please? I am reading the novel and cannot get the meaning of the word "Prom" from this context: "The rain falls slow and steady, then gusting, reminding me of Galway when I was a child where Atlantic winds flung broken fronds of seaweed onto the Prom during high tide". I looked through the internet but found just some information about the author. She comes from Nothern Ireland, where school promenades traditionally occur. The dictionary of abbreviations says that "prom" is an abbreviated form of "promenade". But i think, not in this context. Looks like it should be a mountain or valley, or something like it but in words of room nouns.

Thanks in advance Brick wall
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 22, 2014 12:30:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,997
Neurons: 93,425
A seafront of a town is called the prom. It is short for the promenade - the place where people would go out for a walk - a promenade.


amazing, it doesn't seem to be listed in tfd. It has 'a walk, especially along the seaside'. but the prom is the physical place - the open area, the railings, the sea wall, the seagulls, the waves.....Whistle



[image not available]

The Mountains of Mourne viewed from the promenade at Newcastle, County Down, Northern Ireland

or, at seaside resorts with amusement arcades, all the noise, and a place to pick up girls...
prof_question
Posted: Saturday, November 22, 2014 12:32:52 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/5/2011
Posts: 63
Neurons: 659
Location: Kharkiv, Kharkivs'ka Oblast', Ukraine
thanks thar Applause Applause Applause
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 22, 2014 12:56:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,997
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One point of correction. The author may have been in Northern Ireland later in life, but if they were remembering a childhood in Galway, that is in what is now the Republic of Ireland, which is a different country from Northern Ireland (of course, depending on when they lived, at that point it may have all been Ireland).
Galway is on the West coast, so storms there are in from the Atlantic.

And looking at pictures, there do seem to be areas with beaches and areas with no protection, just a sea wall and a raised walking area, so walking along the prom in a storm would be an elemental experience!


prof_question
Posted: Saturday, November 22, 2014 2:40:50 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/5/2011
Posts: 63
Neurons: 659
Location: Kharkiv, Kharkivs'ka Oblast', Ukraine
thanks again)))
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