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PereCape
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 9:15:02 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/24/2014
Posts: 14
Neurons: 191,708
Location: Falset, Catalonia, Spain
Hello everybody,

I have a real doubt with the word "arch"

example "archenemy

Please if someone can help me

THANK YOU ALL
thar
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 9:39:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 23,041
Neurons: 93,553
What is it you have doubts about?

I would not make it one word, I would hyphenate it:
arch-enemy.

'arch' is just a prefix indicating 'extreme' or 'most'. It occurs in several words, or you can add it for effect.

eg a cartoon bad guy is an arch-fiend.

The person you obsess about defeating is your arch-enemy.

The villains in James Bond films are arch-villains.

On a gentler side, a priest can be an archdeacon (senior to his deacons), or an archbishop (senior to his bishops).And the most senior angel in Christianity is the Archangel Gabriel.Angel
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 9:52:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
Posts: 1,447
Neurons: 699,908
Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Hello everybody,

I have a real doubt with the word "arch"

example "archenemy"

Please if someone can help me

THANK YOU ALL

Wow....that's a good word. There are several meanings:
1. ARCHITECTURE: An upside down 'U' over an entrance made of wood or concrete. (The shape distributes weight to the sides and not the top)
2. ANATOMY: A part of the bottom of the foot....you couldn't serve in the armed forces if you were 'flat foot', meaning fallen arches.
3. The chief of....as in 'archenemy'....(the worst of your enemy's), also 'archangel', etc.
You do not need an abbreviation.....

Hope this helps....hedy
franziska_01
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 10:08:40 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/11/2011
Posts: 147
Neurons: 14,026
Location: Genova, Liguria, Italy
Arch is a prefix deriving from Ancient Greek, present in many languages under different forms (for instance, in Italian is "arci"). It means "the greatest". So, arch-enemy means the greatest enemy, arch-fiend means the greatest fiend and so on.
Judith M
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 10:57:36 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/30/2014
Posts: 41
Neurons: 280,543
Location: Detroit, Michigan, United States
Interesting question.
Per the Grammar Girl website:
American English does not hyphenate = archenemy
British English uses both hyphenated and not hyphenated, one not being more correct than the other
arch-enemy archenemy

Refer to her website for further clarification
Daniel B.
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 12:06:05 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/8/2014
Posts: 9
Neurons: 2,720
Location: Penn, Pennsylvania, United States
this enemy was high [arch] on top of the list.
simply put he was my arch-enemy.

she was next in line to replace me.
she was my arch-rival.

high on the list / top / main or pinnacle
Rudra Saikat
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 12:29:19 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/27/2014
Posts: 31
Neurons: 48,407
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
"arch" can be used with or without a following hyphen. Boo hoo!
Bareskin2000
Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 4:19:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/28/2014
Posts: 192
Neurons: 471,878
Location: Ramsgate, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
In UK english there is no hyphen. In American "english" the hyphen is used by those who use slightly older styles of use of english.
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