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do + ing Options
Monkeyaround
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:53:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/10/2014
Posts: 409
Neurons: 2,159
1. can you do sneezing
2. can you do a sneeze
3. can you do sneezes

are all the three correct?

Thank you
Allana
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 11:54:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2014
Posts: 693
Neurons: 621,360
Location: Saint Albans, England, United Kingdom
No. None are correct. You sneeze, or you can sneeze.
And be careful with the past tense. To sneeze is a regular verb and goes to 'I sneezed' and 'I was sneezing', while to freeze is not and goes to 'I froze' or 'I am frozen.
Saad Shams Nebula
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 12:31:10 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/5/2014
Posts: 23
Neurons: 18,666
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
none is correct... :(
Crawdaddy
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 1:06:33 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/25/2014
Posts: 136
Neurons: 2,057
1. I have been sneezing all afternoon. I am probably catching a cold.
2. I had a sneeze coming, and then it went away.
3. Three sneezes in a row is the most I have ever experienced.
fireflame
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 7:22:27 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/4/2014
Posts: 6
Neurons: 4,134
Location: Los Angeles, California, United States
they are wrong.
Kerry.P
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 8:05:04 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/7/2012
Posts: 2,657
Neurons: 13,143
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Hi Monkeyaround.

I do not understand why all these people have logged on to say that your sentences are wrong. Their responses are not correct.

If I take the context that you are speaking to a young child (or baby) and you want to teach them about sneezing, then it is correct to ask:
- Can you sneeze?

I would also possibly ask a child:
- Can you do a sneeze for me?

At the moment I can't think of a way to use "sneezing" in this context; I'm sure others can help.
Monkeyaround
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 8:41:47 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/10/2014
Posts: 409
Neurons: 2,159
Thank you KerryP. You have saved me from having another wonder.

I'd like to continue my question on do + ing.
Is there any examples of do + ing and what could these two words exactly mean?
L.Rai
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 9:32:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/20/2014
Posts: 783
Neurons: 1,867,794
Location: Grover Beach, California, United States
Kerry:

I am not sure I totally agree with you. Even when speaking with a young child I probably wouldn't use the sentence:

Can you do a sneeze for me? I might say: Can you sneeze for me? Do a sneeze just seems awkward here so I probably wouldn't use it.

________________

Dear Monkeyaround:

Here is a web site that will answer your question about how to use do+ing

http://www.englishgrammar.org/do-ing/

I think this should help you.
Monkeyaround
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 11:20:02 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/10/2014
Posts: 409
Neurons: 2,159
On this british children's program was used "can you do a tiny sneeze", so Now I wonder if with "tiny" everybody would be ok about the usage.

Thank you LRai. That off site info was helpful. How about "Can you do some swimming" ? Is it asking one's ability?
And also If I said "can you do some sneezing", this would have been ok, doesn't it?
L.Rai
Posted: Thursday, November 13, 2014 1:58:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/20/2014
Posts: 783
Neurons: 1,867,794
Location: Grover Beach, California, United States
Monkeyaround wrote:
On this british children's program was used "can you do a tiny sneeze", so Now I wonder if with "tiny" everybody would be ok about the usage.

Thank you LRai. That off site info was helpful. How about "Can you do some swimming" ? Is it asking one's ability?
And also If I said "can you do some sneezing", this would have been ok, doesn't it?


Dear Monkeyaround:

Okay not sure about BE but I guess you could say : Can you do a tiny sneeze? (not sure why you'd want to but it can be said.)

If someone were trying out for a swimming class I suppose the instructor could ask, "Can you do some swimming?" and that would be asking about their ability.

I am not sure why someone would want anyone to sneeze, but again maybe the doctor is asking if the person can in order to check them out.

Is there a context for these sentences?? What are you trying to learn? That would help greatly in how those of us who are trying to help you respond.

Romany
Posted: Friday, November 14, 2014 6:59:25 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,937
Neurons: 58,266
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
I think the reason these sentences about sneezing are difficult to pin down is because sneezing is an involuntary action. One can't MAKE someone sneeze.(Well, you could throw pepper at them, I guess!!) It's the result of certain nerves and neurons reacting to a foreign body (either germs or dust etc) and trying to expel it. So asking someone to "do" or "make" or "have" a sneeze sounds like asking for the impossible. Perhaps, in the programme, someone was being asked if they could PRETEND to sneeze?

Your original question is asking about "do" + "ing" words, yes? It's not a very common form.

One doesn't usually ask if one can "do" words ending in "ing", (swimming, reading, dancing, playing)

"Can you swim?" "Do you want TO GO swimming?"
"Can you read?" "Do you LIKE reading?"
"Can you dance?" "Do you want TO GO dancing."
"Can you play (the piano)?" "Do you want to play (the piano) for us?" "Do you want to go out to play?" (in the sense of children playing games.)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, November 14, 2014 5:45:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,591
Neurons: 230,746
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hiya!

This is an 'odd' phrase for general English - it is an example of "child talk" which some adults use around children for some unknown reason.

"Do + <verb>-ing" is just the same as the simple <verb> - so it is a completely useless type of phrase.

"I am doing eating" is exactly the same as "I am eating".

"I was doing swimming" is the same as "I was swimming".

HOWEVER - "do + <action noun>" is a useful type of phrase, because it allows the use of qualifiers or determiners which could not easily be used with a verb.

For example:

1. "You should do exercising." or "You should do exercise." sound strange - it means "You should exercise".
But with qualifiers, the "do+noun" sentence sounds OK.
"You should do brief occasional light exercise." - this is better than "You should briefly exercise lightly occasionally."

2. "Can you do writing?" sounds totally odd - it just means "Can you write?".
But a determiner is sometimes needed, which cannot be added to a verb, so the 'do+noun' or "do + <verb>-ing" is used.
"Can you do a little writing?" (I need a sample of your handwriting.) would have to become "Can you write me a short passage.", which is OK, but not so natural.

"Can you do a bit of work for me?" - "Can you work for me for a short time?" - "Can you work for me for a bit?"

Also, there are some 'action nouns' which have no equivalent verb - so the 'do+noun' is necessary.

"What are you doing this afternoon?" - "I'm doing some carpentry."

There is no easy way to say this without the 'do' - "I'm working with wood, building something." is correct, but too long.

English - particularly conversational speech - is designed to use the fewest words or syllables possible.
English people will rarely use four words when three will say the same thing.
You will notice that each of the red sentences is longer than its equivalent green one.
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