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Guy Fawkes Day Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Guy Fawkes Day

On the night of November 4, 1605, 36 barrels of gunpowder were discovered beneath the Houses of Parliament in London. The conspirators of the Gunpowder Plot planned to blow up King James I to avenge laws against Roman Catholics. While Guy Fawkes didn't originate the plan, he was caught red-handed after someone tipped off the king's ministers. The following year, Parliament established November 5 as a national day of thanksgiving. Effigies of Guy Fawkes are still burned in bonfires that night, and fireworks fill the skies over Britain in remembrance of the failure of the Gunpowder Plot. More...
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 2:24:21 AM

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Guy Fawkes got the blame, but are they sure it was him & not just someone with a Vendetta?
Maybe it was an internet conspiracy, someone Anonymous?
Shashank Kumar Singh
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 4:33:59 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Guy Fawkes Day

On the night of November 4, 1605, 36 barrels of gunpowder were discovered beneath the Houses of Parliament in London. The conspirators of the Gunpowder Plot planned to blow up King James I to avenge laws against Roman Catholics. While Guy Fawkes didn't originate the plan, he was caught red-handed after someone tipped off the king's ministers. The following year, Parliament established November 5 as a national day of thanksgiving. Effigies of Guy Fawkes are still burned in bonfires that night, and fireworks fill the skies over Britain in remembrance of the failure of the Gunpowder Plot. More...
Boo hoo!
TB Turtle
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 10:14:43 AM

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Gees Louise! Our "crazy cousins across the pond" were quick with the Death Penalty. Most countries run by despots point to America. However in America it could take years before going to trial and then 20+ more years for retrial. We don't murder someone because they disagree politically or love someone not deemed decent. Since the plot was foiled, in America they would have lived out their days well fed, etc.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 11:38:27 AM

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For 400 years, bonfires have burned
on November 5th to mark the failed Gunpowder Plot.


The tradition of Guy Fawkes-related bonfires actually began the very same year as the failed coup. The Plot was foiled in the night between the 4th and 5th of November 1605. Already on the 5th, agitated Londoners who knew little more than that their King had been saved, joyfully lit bonfires in thanksgiving. As years progressed, however, the ritual became more elaborate.

Soon, people began placing effigies onto bonfires, and fireworks were added to the celebrations. Effigies of Guy Fawkes, and sometimes those of the Pope, graced the pyres. Still today, some communities throw dummies of both Guy Fawkes and the Pope on the bonfire (and even those of a contemporary politician or two), although the gesture is seen by most as a quirky tradition, rather than an expression of hostility towards the Pope.

Preparations for Bonfire Night celebrations include making a dummy of Guy Fawkes, which is called "the Guy". Some children even keep up an old tradition of walking in the streets, carrying "the Guy" they have just made, and beg passersby for "a penny for the Guy." The kids use the money to buy fireworks for the evening festivities.

On the night itself, Guy is placed on top of the bonfire, which is then set alight; and fireworks displays fill the sky.

The extent of the celebrations and the size of the bonfire varies from one community to the next. Lewes, in the South East of England, is famous for its Bonfire Night festivities and consistently attracts thousands of people each year to participate.

Bonfire Night is not only celebrated in Britain. The tradition crossed the oceans and established itself in the British colonies during the centuries. It was actively celebrated in New England as "Pope Day" as late as the 18th century. Today, November 5th bonfires still light up in far out places like New Zealand and Newfoundland in Canada.

http://www.bonfirenight.net/
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 12:08:04 PM

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early_apex
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 12:11:17 PM
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The Attorney General Sir Edward Coke told the court that each of the condemned would be drawn backwards to his death, by a horse, his head near the ground. They were to be "put to death halfway between heaven and earth as unworthy of both". Their genitals would be cut off and burnt before their eyes, and their bowels and hearts removed. They would then be decapitated, and the dismembered parts of their bodies displayed so that they might become "prey for the fowls of the air".

On 31 January 1606, Fawkes and three others – Thomas Wintour, Ambrose Rookwood, and Robert Keyes – were dragged (i.e. drawn) from the Tower on wattled hurdles to the Old Palace Yard at Westminster, opposite the building they had attempted to destroy.[54] His fellow plotters were then hanged and quartered. Fawkes was the last to stand on the scaffold. He asked for forgiveness of the King and state, while keeping up his "crosses and idle ceremonies". Weakened by torture and aided by the hangman, Fawkes began to climb the ladder to the noose, but either through jumping to his death or climbing too high so the rope was incorrectly set, he managed to avoid the agony of the latter part of his execution by breaking his neck.[37][55][56] His lifeless body was nevertheless quartered[57] and, as was the custom,[58] his body parts were then distributed to "the four corners of the kingdom", to be displayed as a warning to other would-be traitors.
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 1:54:58 PM

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TB Turtle wrote:
Gees Louise! Our "crazy cousins across the pond" were quick with the Death Penalty. Most countries run by despots point to America. However in America it could take years before going to trial and then 20+ more years for retrial. We don't murder someone because they disagree politically or love someone not deemed decent. Since the plot was foiled, in America they would have lived out their days well fed, etc.


Gees Louise! Get a grip! This happened centuries before the invention of the telegraph, never mind the internet. ;-)
dispossessed
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 3:44:02 PM

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Just for the record, most people in England call this 'Bonfire Night'
striker
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 5:17:59 PM
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what if the plot wasn't dicovered
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 6:02:45 PM

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From 1066 And All That :

Gunpowder Plot

There were a great many plots and Parliaments in James I's reign, and one of the Parliaments was called the Addled Parliament because the plots hatched in it were all such rotten ones. One plot, however, was by far the best plot in History, and the day and month of it (though not, of course, the year) are well known to be utterly and even maddeningly memorable.

The Gunpowder Plot arose in the following way: the King had recently invented a new table called Avoirduroi, which said:

i New Presbyter = I old priest.

o Bishop = o King.

James was always repeating, 'No Bishop, No King'" to himself, and one day a certain loyal citizen called Sir Guyfawkes, a very active and conscientious man, overheard him, and thought it was the slogan of James's new policy. So he decided to carry it out at once and made a very loyal plan to blow up the King and the bishops and everybody else in Parliament assembled, with gun-powder.* Although the plan failed, attempts are made every year on St Guyfawkes' Day to remind the Parliament that it would have been a Good Thing.



*Recently invented by Francis Bacon, author of Shakespeare, etc.

Pilgrims' Progress

It was at this time that some very pious Englishmen, known as the Early Fathers, who were being persecuted for not learning Avoirduroi, sailed away to America in a ship called the Mayfly; this is generally referred to as the Pilgrims' Progress and was one of the chief causes of America.



I think that makes it all perfectly clear... Angel
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 6:59:53 PM

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excaelis wrote:
From 1066 And All That :

Gunpowder Plot

There were a great many plots and Parliaments in James I's reign, and one of the Parliaments was called the Addled Parliament because the plots hatched in it were all such rotten ones. One plot, however, was by far the best plot in History, and the day and month of it (though not, of course, the year) are well known to be utterly and even maddeningly memorable.

The Gunpowder Plot arose in the following way: the King had recently invented a new table called Avoirduroi, which said:

i New Presbyter = I old priest.

o Bishop = o King.

James was always repeating, 'No Bishop, No King'" to himself, and one day a certain loyal citizen called Sir Guyfawkes, a very active and conscientious man, overheard him, and thought it was the slogan of James's new policy. So he decided to carry it out at once and made a very loyal plan to blow up the King and the bishops and everybody else in Parliament assembled, with gun-powder.* Although the plan failed, attempts are made every year on St Guyfawkes' Day to remind the Parliament that it would have been a Good Thing.


*Recently invented by Francis Bacon, author of Shakespeare, etc.

Pilgrims' Progress

It was at this time that some very pious Englishmen, known as the Early Fathers, who were being persecuted for not learning Avoirduroi, sailed away to America in a ship called the Mayfly; this is generally referred to as the Pilgrims' Progress and was one of the chief causes of America.



I think that makes it all perfectly clear... Angel


<LOL>

Love that Canuckian humour ! ;-)

NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Thursday, November 6, 2014 7:23:33 AM

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TB Turtle wrote:
Gees Louise! Our "crazy cousins across the pond" were quick with the Death Penalty. Most countries run by despots point to America. However in America it could take years before going to trial and then 20+ more years for retrial. We don't murder someone because they disagree politically or love someone not deemed decent. Since the plot was foiled, in America they would have lived out their days well fed, etc.


This was in 1605! Are you sure they would have lived out their days well fed? I heard you were all burning witches back then?
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Thursday, November 6, 2014 9:54:32 PM

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I have often wondered what the outcome would have been if the plan had worked????
excaelis
Posted: Friday, November 7, 2014 8:56:37 PM

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