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Bebop Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Bebop

Bebop is a jazz style characterized by harmonic complexity, overlapping melodic lines, and frequent shifting of rhythm—which its name mimics. It emerged in the 1940s as a group of musicians—including Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and Charlie Parker—rejected conventional swing to pioneer an extension of improvised jazz. In the 1950s, two genres grew out of bebop: the aggressive style of hard bop and the understated approach of cool jazz. What does "dropping bombs" mean in a bebop arrangement? More...
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 6:45:02 AM

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Daemon wrote:


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Bebop

Bebop is a jazz style characterized by harmonic complexity, overlapping melodic lines, and frequent shifting of rhythm—which its name mimics. It emerged in the 1940s as a group of musicians—including Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and Charlie Parker—rejected conventional swing to pioneer an extension of improvised jazz. In the 1950s, two genres grew out of bebop: the aggressive style of hard bop and the understated approach of cool jazz. What does "dropping bombs" mean in a bebop arrangement? More...

Answer from article:
Quote:
Swing drummers had kept up a steady four-to-the-bar pulse on the bass drum. Bop drummers, led by Kenny Clarke, moved the drumset's time-keeping function to the ride or hi-hat cymbal, reserving the bass drum for accents. Bass drum accents were colloquially termed "dropping bombs."

I love Bessie Smith, raqtime, Leadbelly, field hollers, work songs, but when it comes to modern jazz, you lose me.
LucOneOff
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 7:11:58 AM

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dropping bombs is a technique in which a drummer plays unpredictable rhythmic accents. In the bebop era, a strike on the snare drum was typically followed immediately by an explosion on the bass drum. (Some say the name "be-bop" comes from this combination.) Dropping bombs remains an important way for the drummer to add a contrasting rhythmic layer.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 8:42:17 AM

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One of the founders of bebop, drummer Kenny Clarke, is less well-known than allies like Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, but his influence is just as deep.

That thing that jazz drummers do — that ching-chinga-ching beat on the ride cymbal, like sleigh bells? It gives the music a light, airy, driving pulse. Clarke came up with that, and that springy shimmer came to epitomize swinging itself.

Before him, jazz drummers kept time lightly on the bass drum. Kenny Clarke used bass drum sparingly, often tethered to his snare, for dramatic accents in odd places — what jazz folk call "dropping bombs." He drew on his playing for stage shows, where drummers punctuate the action with split-second timing. Clarke kicked a band along

http://www.npr.org/2014/01/09/261051016/kenny-clarke-inventor-of-modern-jazz-drumming-at-100
Gary98
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:12:43 AM

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Is bebop popular with white folks also, or is it mainly black American? Just checking.
xsmith
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:44:02 AM
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This is a very good article. To answer the question about it's popularity among blacks and whites, bebop is a genre that is no longer popular, although many jazz musicians use elements of it in their music. Many true jazz fans regardless of their race loved bebop. It was very popular in Europe and many of the musicians became ex-patriots because they could get steady work there. Many of the musicians on the list at the end of the article are white. Jazz in general has crossed over into the white community. Many universities have jazz departments that are the sources of today's jazz musicians. One sees mostly whites attending concerts, festivals, and patronizing jazz clubs. Commercial radio stations choose not to have jazz formats because it is a small niche market, like Classical music. I listen to jazz on WBGO 88.3 FM, a Newark, NJ, station that also live streams (WBGO.org). XM-Sirius satellite radio has a classic jazz channel that is excellent. Music Choice on cable TV also has a classic jazz channel. You can hear some bebop sprinkled in among the other styles they feature.

By the way, Philly had a thriving jazz scene once upon a time. Some of the musicians on the list are from Philly.
striker
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 2:02:58 PM
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bebop or hip hop same thing
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 7:34:29 PM

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This was the first "real" music I could get into as a child in the 1940's. Later I expanded my "likes" to just about all music but seemed to gravitate to music that was more difficult for a musician to play. To date, if I had to choose just 1, it would be classical, followed by jazz.
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