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Simple translation of two quotes Options
techtrones
Posted: Sunday, November 2, 2014 4:00:25 PM
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Hi I am new to this forum and looking forward to learn more about English literature. Also I would like you all to know that English is not my first language. There are some quotes I found fascinating but I am unable to understand. Somebody kindly translate these into simple English so I can really understand what the author's of these quotes actually meant.

1) What anger worse or slower to abate than lovers love when it turns to hate.--Euripides

2) True love is quiescent, except in the nascent moments of true humility.--Bryant H. McGill

I am sorry if I am posting in wrong section of this forum. In that case I would request the Admin to move my tread to correct section but do not delete this thread.




Romany
Posted: Monday, November 3, 2014 4:36:27 AM
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Hi Techtrones - you certainly have picked two very difficult quotes to understand. A fair proportion of native speakers would find these two difficult to understand as well!

The first one says that, once love has turned to hate that feeling lasts a long time.

The second one is a little trickier. It says that being in love with someone often means one accepts the way the loved one behaves and the things they say. However, once one has truly learned humility, one doesn't accept everything at face value.

e.g. a person in love will tell you you are the most beautiful, wonderful person in the world. It's very comforting to accept that. But a humble person knows that it isn't true. That opinion belongs only to one person - to the rest of the world one is still the same (perhaps rather ordinary?) person.
hassanishome2
Posted: Monday, November 3, 2014 5:52:37 AM

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As to the first one; Hmm, Ummph, Ummph again, well, having gone through some necessary meditation, i feel like it says lovers r arrant rogues once deprived of their fickle garb of affections. I hope it makes sense to YOU! :D
PS: Not a native speaker either.
hassanishome2
Posted: Monday, November 3, 2014 5:55:43 AM

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An excellent interpretation of the second quote by Romany.
techtrones
Posted: Monday, November 3, 2014 7:49:29 AM
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Romany wrote:
Hi Techtrones - you certainly have picked two very difficult quotes to understand. A fair proportion of native speakers would find these two difficult to understand as well!

The first one says that, once love has turned to hate that feeling lasts a long time.

The second one is a little trickier. It says that being in love with someone often means one accepts the way the loved one behaves and the things they say. However, once one has truly learned humility, one doesn't accept everything at face value.

e.g. a person in love will tell you you are the most beautiful, wonderful person in the world. It's very comforting to accept that. But a humble person knows that it isn't true. That opinion belongs only to one person - to the rest of the world one is still the same (perhaps rather ordinary?) person.


Thanks Romany, Now I can better understand these quotes. Applause
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 3:57:10 AM
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Glad I could help.
early_apex
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 11:41:59 AM
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To me, the first quote is observing that as ardent as lovers love may be for each other, if it fails and turns to hate, then the hate is stronger and lasts longer than any other. This is probably true.

For the second quote, I had to look up the vocabulary words the author employed:
quiescent: still or quiet; inactive
nascent: emerging, coming to life

So it seems to say that true love may go unnoticed until a person attains a certain level of humility, then it begins to make itself known.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 6:25:34 AM
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Interesting, Early A.

We agree on the first, but in the second have two different explanations:

I utilise the passive quality of the word quiescence to mean "acceptance." In fact, one often comes across the word used this way in speech passages.

"You aren't to open that door ever again!" roared David's father.
"I shan't. Ever." David acquiesced.

Thus my understanding: In the first stages of love one accepts (and often is reassured, and feels good) that one is brave, good, beautiful. It's part of the magic of being in love: one feels ready to take on the whole world.

But gradually other feelings start to intrude as the hormones calm down and one is brought back to the real world. Reality brings with it the first buds of truth (the 'nascences' of reality) which gradually brings about the humility of accepting that one is a giant among men or women only in one person's eyes. Not really a world conqueror.

I guess wise, humble people accept this and thank their lucky stars that at least one person in the world finds them special.

Others don't like being brought back down to earth and so end the relationship and go looking for someone else who will make them feel like a god again.

But, as ever, it's very seldom we find out exactly what thoughts prompted someone to say what they have said. So I guess our own personal interpretations are what make us accept or reject; agree or disagree with "quotes"?

Pierre Idontcare
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 3:56:29 PM

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Quiescent doesn't mean accepting though, like acquiescent does. the second quote to me doesn't really say much without a larger context. 'quiescent,' 'nascent,' and 'true humility' when talking about something already vague, like love (more so with 'true love'), adds more vagary (dumb joke) to what's already not clearly defined. it's new-agey, self-improvement talk, making pinning down a single meaning hard.

here's how i would break it down on its own though. transliterating it to the layman, it'd be something like 'true, deep love doesn't show itself, except in the first stages when one becomes really humble.'

he's making some underlying cultural assumptions. one is that love is like a passion, rowdy. another is that love is often about the self, or ego, instead of about the other person/thing. 'true love,' then, transcends this. true love is quiet, dormant, bone-deep. true love isn't about the hot-blooded feeling love gives you, but about transferring the focus outward, to the other person or thing, or to the love created between you and that personthing. it has overtones of eastern thought to it, where the self assumes a subsidiary role.

love is not about you, but about giving yourself up to the higher (probably purer) power of love. when you give yourself up to true love then your quiet, dormant love will manifest or blossom, into what, i don't know.

some things the quote doesn't address. why would the quiescence only exist in the 'nascent moments' of humility, rather than all moments of humility, or the state of humility? why does true love require true humility? does all true love require true humility? how's true humility different than humility? are we supposed to read into the medical connotation 'quiescent' has, because diseases can be quiescent. so could true love be called pathological? is that a slip in the writer's control of language or a strange kind of larger commentary?

i'd cite this more as an example of fuzzy logic cloaked as something very meaningful than as a good quote worthy to live by. two cents out.



Sadaf Qadir
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 4:45:52 AM

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The word quiescent literally means 'a state of dormancy ' and humility means 'the quality of not being proud or to lack significance'.
According to my assumption,poet emphasises on the fact that in true love a lover sacrifices itself without being conditional but as soon as he realizes that his unconditional silent love is being interpreted as his own insignificance, it doesn't remains silent anymore.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 25, 2019 10:58:53 AM

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The first quote from Euripides is simply as Romany says "true love, when it changes to hate, lasts a long time."

The second one . . . look at the phrases individually. Look up any words you don't understand and use each definition enough times so you're comfortable with it.

True love is quiescent - true love is dormant, inactive.

except in the nascent moments - except at the beginning

of true humility.

Take your pick:

True love is inactive except when you begin to be humble.
You only love another person truly when you're humble.
You can't love another if you love yourself too much.
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