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The wise man does at once what the fool does finally. Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527)
Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 2:58:18 AM
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Indecision may be as foolish as rashness... But label (rather libel) "the fool" is certainly can trigger some weak person to action.
walirlan
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 3:10:52 AM

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A wise man is able to draw a conclusion, the fool is not capable of doing so.
coag
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 3:12:11 AM

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Defer no time, delays have dangerous ends; (Shakespeare)
Miriam...
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 3:36:35 AM

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"Fools rush in where angels fear to tread."
--Alexander Pope
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 3:39:19 AM

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Machiavelli's The Prince: the megalomaniac's handbook.
MechPebbles
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 7:23:46 AM

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Only hindsight allows such easy designation.
Chanfarr
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 7:54:02 AM
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About Quote:
Source: This quote is from “The art of worldly wisdom” (1904) by Baltasar Gracian, translated from Spanish by Joseph Jacobs; Maxim: cclxviii (The Wise do at once what the Fool does at last).

Complete Sentence: The Wise do at once what the Fool does at last. Both do the same thing ; the only difference lies in the time they do it : the one at the right time, the other at the wrong. Who starts out with his mind topsyturvy will so continue till the end. He catches by the foot what he ought to knock on the head, he turns right into left, and in all his acts is but a child. There is only one way to get him in the right way, and that is to force him to do what he might have done of his own accord. The wise man, on the other hand, sees at once what must be done sooner or later, so he does it willingly and gains honour thereby.


Then again isn't it better to be positive and say "Better late than never".
Dannycohen
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 8:12:06 AM
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"a fool will jump right in the water, a wise man will taste it first and decide whether it's even drinkable"
Siamak
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 8:59:07 AM

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nice quote, but it's unbelievable from Machiavelli.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 9:15:21 AM

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This quote is not Machiavellian.....

Machiavellian Misquotes.

Machiavelli today is commonly known by two things. One is the statement that, ‘the end justifies the means.’ The other is by the adjective ‘Machiavellian,’ meaning something evil, underhanded, treacherous, cunning or sneaky in politics. Neither is accurate.
Machiavelli did not write ‘the end justifies the means.’ It is a modern condensation – and somewhat of a simplification – of an idea expressed in The Prince. However memorable it is, he had a lot more to say about politics and the behaviour of rulers than that one line.
Nor did Machiavelli write, ‘Never to attempt to win by force what can be won by deception,’ in The Prince. That is a mis-quote, likely paraphrased from The Discourses, Book III: 40, or Book II: 13. It might even derive from The Art of War by Sun-Tzu. While popular on the Internet, this unsourced quote is not one of his maxims.

Other things Machiavelli did NOT say include these pseudo-quotes taken from various, mostly inaccurate and never verified, quotation sites online:

“Politics have no relation to morals.”
“It is double pleasure to deceive the deceiver.”
“Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage.”
“It is not titles that honor men, but men that honor titles.”
“The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.”
“Before all else, be armed.”
“The more sand has escaped from the hourglass of our life, the clearer we should see through it.”
“History is written by the victors.”
“One should never fall in the belief that you can find someone to pick you up.”
“God creates men, but they choose each other.”
“Princes and governments are far more dangerous than other elements within society.”
“A prince is also esteemed when he is a true friend and a true enemy.”
“He who blinded by ambition, raises himself to a position whence he cannot mount higher, must thereafter fall with the greatest loss.”
“War is just when it is necessary; arms are permissible when there is no hope except in arms.”
“Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer.”

NONE of the above lines were written by Machiavelli, yet all appear on unverified, online so-called quotation database pages.See Wikiquote for some actual, sourced quotes, and some misquotes explained.

Read more :http://ianchadwick.com/machiavelli/addenda/machiavellian-misquotes/
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 9:16:46 AM

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Chanfarr wrote:
About Quote:
Source: This quote is from “The art of worldly wisdom” (1904) by Baltasar Gracian, translated from Spanish by Joseph Jacobs; Maxim: cclxviii (The Wise do at once what the Fool does at last).

Complete Sentence: The Wise do at once what the Fool does at last. Both do the same thing ; the only difference lies in the time they do it : the one at the right time, the other at the wrong. Who starts out with his mind topsyturvy will so continue till the end. He catches by the foot what he ought to knock on the head, he turns right into left, and in all his acts is but a child. There is only one way to get him in the right way, and that is to force him to do what he might have done of his own accord. The wise man, on the other hand, sees at once what must be done sooner or later, so he does it willingly and gains honour thereby.


Then again isn't it better to be positive and say "Better late than never".


YES! Thanks for perfect information!!
Applause
Gary98
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 9:32:17 AM

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MechPebbles wrote:
Only hindsight allows such easy designation.


Those are called wise ones because they see most others fail to see.
Gary98
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 9:51:14 AM

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Daemon wrote:
The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527)


This is a good one no matter who said it. We in the states need to get this one, really.
OMF1969
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 9:58:40 AM
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Be quick or be dead.
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 10:57:33 AM

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OMF1969 wrote:
Be quick or be dead.

The quick & the dead. Another popularly misunderstood quote. It doesn't mean you must be fast or you'll be dead. Quick used to mean alive: the quick & the dead meant the living & the dead. The phrase "Be quick!" as an exhortation to hurry up literally meant "Be alive!", but has gradually come to mean fast as well.
Yeah I'm such a nerd. I also read The Prince. It bored the hell out of me, I didn't retain much of it. I would never have picked monomagda's facts. d'oh!
Thank you monomagda! Applause
EllieMae
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 11:20:34 AM
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This quote is personally interesting as it compliments the message our pastor gave this past Sunday.
He spoke about Proverbs 27:12 which says "The wise see danger and seek refuge but the simple (or naïve) keep going and suffer for it." Essentially the message was that our direction, not our intention, will determine our destination.

Unfortunately I've experienced (read: been guilty of) procrastination far too much in my life despite both my intent and any hindsight I've gained (can hindsight be truly gained if not learned from? i.e. is it even hindsight if not learned from?), but perhaps the previously mentioned, more positive outlook, "Better late than never" will help me not focus on the past...... Well, if I am to learn today, right now, I'll be wise & go do at once what needs to be done... One last thought.. re: "Fools rush in..." -- I'd say that while the wise do at once what needs to be done, this includes seeing the need to wait, then act. Thoughts?
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 12:09:02 PM

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I think you have it, EllieMae. There is a time to act, and a time to wait, and usually there are unintended consequences to everything.

The unfortunate thing is that life gives us the test first, and the lesson second. This is why it is so important to study history and learn from the mistakes of the past, so as not to repeat them. Thus the saying, "Those who don't remember history are doomed to repeat it".

But we seem not to have learned that maxim either, for we continue to make those same mistakes, repeatedly.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 12:49:12 PM

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NeuroticHellFem wrote:
OMF1969 wrote:
Be quick or be dead.

The quick & the dead. Another popularly misunderstood quote. It doesn't mean you must be fast or you'll be dead. Quick used to mean alive: the quick & the dead meant the living & the dead. The phrase "Be quick!" as an exhortation to hurry up literally meant "Be alive!", but has gradually come to mean fast as well.
Yeah I'm such a nerd. I also read The Prince. It bored the hell out of me, I didn't retain much of it. I would never have picked monomagda's facts. d'oh!
Thank you monomagda! Applause


You are absolutely not a nerd! You are pretty witty !
Thanks! Dancing
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 1:51:14 PM
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Daemon wrote:
The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527)


The wise man does it once and is done with it--at once or finally. It's not when it's done, as much as doing it right.
S. Miranda-Hess
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 2:15:45 PM

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I think what this quote is saying is that fools procrastinate what wise people know they ought to do right away.
Corner of Josh
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 2:38:27 PM
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Location: Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel
Fools take their foolishness with them to their graves.
Dialectrum
Posted: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 8:34:56 PM

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Those who hesitate....masturbate.
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 4:14:11 PM

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monamagda wrote:
NeuroticHellFem wrote:
OMF1969 wrote:
Be quick or be dead.

The quick & the dead. Another popularly misunderstood quote. It doesn't mean you must be fast or you'll be dead. Quick used to mean alive: the quick & the dead meant the living & the dead. The phrase "Be quick!" as an exhortation to hurry up literally meant "Be alive!", but has gradually come to mean fast as well.
Yeah I'm such a nerd. I also read The Prince. It bored the hell out of me, I didn't retain much of it. I would never have picked monomagda's facts. d'oh!
Thank you monomagda! Applause


You are absolutely not a nerd! You are pretty witty !
Thanks! Dancing

Thanks to you monamagda!
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 5:26:30 PM
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Joined: 10/3/2012
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Chanfarr wrote: "Source: This quote is from “The art of worldly wisdom” (1904) by Baltasar Gracian, translated from Spanish by Joseph Jacobs; Maxim: cclxviii (The Wise do at once what the Fool does at last)"

Welcome to the forum.

Actually Baltasar Gracian's maxims would be a welcome addition to the quotations page. This link for http://www.online-literature.com/gracian/
has an interesting article on his biography with a brief reference to Gracian's "The Art of Worldly Wisdom" opposite Sun Tzu's "The Art of War"
and Niccolo Machiavelli's "The Prince".

This quotation from wikiquote is a sample of Gracian's wisdom and another perspective to "do at once" :
"Harto presto, si bien.
Do something well, and that is quickly enough.
Maxim 57 (p. 32)"
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