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Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533) Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)

Queen Elizabeth, England's last Tudor monarch, came to the throne during a turbulent period in the nation's history. Although she has been described as vain, miserly, and fickle, she was remarkably successful as queen. During her reign, England pursued a policy of expansionism in commerce and geographical exploration, defeating the Spanish Armada and becoming a major world power. Literature and the arts flourished during the period as well. To whom was the Queen married? More...
Kermit the Frog
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 3:26:54 AM

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A great queen, an amazing woman in a world of men.
dave49491
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 5:23:31 AM

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All links to the article go to Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette instead.
curmudgeonine
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 7:55:37 AM

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The QEI link takes one to Gilbert du Motier. However, she was known as the 'Virgin Queen', so I suspect she was not successfully married to anyone.
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 8:12:33 AM

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In the article she "...insisted she was married to her kingdom and subjects, under divine protection. In 1599, she spoke of 'all my husbands, my good people.'"
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 9:18:21 AM

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How did Alice Morgan get an article quote? I'm like curmudgeonine & dave49491 - I get the article about Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette too. I tried clicking the 'More' link & clicking on the 'Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)' link, BOTH took me to me yesterday's page about La Fayette!
Trivium_Discipulus
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 9:20:07 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)

Queen Elizabeth, England's last Tudor monarch, came to the throne during a turbulent period in the nation's history. Although she has been described as vain, miserly, and fickle, she was remarkably successful as queen. During her reign, England pursued a policy of expansionism in commerce and geographical exploration, defeating the Spanish Armada and becoming a major world power. Literature and the arts flourished during the period as well. To whom was the Queen married? More...


For "royalty" context...

British royalty dined on human flesh (but don't worry it was 300 years ago)
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1389142/British-royalty-dined-human-flesh-dont-worry-300-years-ago.html#ixzz3CdTErv2Q

I wonder what they will be telling us about today 300 years hence...
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 9:21:59 AM

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An idea hit me! I copy/pasted 'Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)' into the search box, thinking I'd worked out Alice Morgan's trick. No results.
What's going on TFD?Think
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 9:32:16 AM

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Trivium_Discipulus wrote:


For "royalty" context...

British royalty dined on human flesh (but don't worry it was 300 years ago)
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1389142/British-royalty-dined-human-flesh-dont-worry-300-years-ago.html#ixzz3CdTErv2Q

I wonder what they will be telling us about today 300 years hence...



Thank you Trivium_Discipulus, at least I've got an article to read, even if I can't access the 'Today's Birthday' article.
This article reminds me of a line from Othello regarding a casual reference to 'mummy'. I wish I could recall the exact line.
I read an article in an Australian newspaper's historical page regarding mummy uses. It's not only pharaohs who were mummified, everyone was mummified, even cats which were sacred! The practice endured for thousands of years. This meant there were literally millions of mummies in existence. One use was as steam engine fuel.
Corner of Josh
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 11:04:03 AM
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Does anyone think that in 2014 a "queen" is anything other than fancy window-dressing?
Gary98
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 3:27:44 PM

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Wisdom of Josh wrote:
Does anyone think that in 2014 a "queen" is anything other than fancy window-dressing?


Some people never know a good thing even it hit their face. A great queen or democracy?
Sybillya
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 5:09:17 PM

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Click the link, which will take you to yesterday's Birthday Boy. Then paste this into the search box:

Queen Elizabeth of England

You should find her that way.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 5:10:53 PM

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[quote=Daemon]
Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)

Queen Elizabeth, England's last Tudor monarch, came to the throne during a turbulent period in the nation's history. Although she has been described as vain, miserly, and fickle, she was remarkably successful as queen. During her reign, England pursued a policy of expansionism in commerce and geographical exploration, defeating the Spanish Armada and becoming a major world power. Literature and the arts flourished during the period as well. To whom was the Queen married?



ACTUALLY THE LINK IS : http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Elizabeth+I
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 5:20:17 PM

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Elizabeth I: The Fairy Queen

Known as "The Virgin Queen" or "Good Queen Bess," she never married or produced an heir. During her reign, which became known as the Elizabethan Era, she was celebrated for her famous virginity in poetry and literature. One of these celebratory pieces was The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser.
Spenser's The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene is an unfinished epic poem, one of the longest in the English language, published in the 1590s. Queen Elizabeth is represented by the titular character of Gloriana. Edmund Spenser dedicated the poem to Queen Elizabeth, calling her the "most high, mighty and magnificent empress renowned for piety, virtue, and all gracious government," and "a most virtuous and beautiful lady."

The Faerie Queene is an allegorical poem with many layers and interpretations, meant to set an example of virtuous and noble behavior. While it is based on Arthurian legend, the poem is directly allegorical to the people and political situations of the time. Elizabeth favored the poem and granted Spenser a pension of 50 pounds a year, and The Faerie Queene was an immediate success.
The Faerie Queene Gloriana
Gloriana, the "Faerie Queene" of the poem, is a queen whose lineage is traced back to King Arthur, who the Tudors also claimed as their ancestor. The moral center of The Faerie Queene, she also embodies noble birth, innocence, purity, virginity and chastity. Queen Elizabeth is also reflected in other female characters, such as Britomart, Mercilla and the virgin Belphoebe, who embody these same traits.

Edmund Spenser's Motives
Although Elizabeth's legendary chastity and virginity were considered virtuous, the characters that represent her in The Faerie Queen, while chaste themselves, longed for romance and love. Britomart's quest was to find her one true love, while Belphoebe develops a relationship with the knight Arthur's squire Timias. Arthur himself looks forward to winning the heart of Queen Gloriana. Historians have suggested that, while praising Queen Elizabeth, Spenser also tried to change her mind about accepting one of her many suitors.
Among her other nicknames, Queen Elizabeth also came to be called Gloriana or The Faerie Queene after her representation in Spenser's epic poem. Though some historians attribute her effectiveness as queen to luck, her popularity and the love and worship of many of her subjects is still evident today in works such as The Faerie Queene.

http://womenshistory.answers.com/notable-women/elizabeth-i-the-fairy-queen
nkelsey
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 8:34:58 PM
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Applause
TB Turtle
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 9:43:43 PM

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Gary98, Cinderella is a European fairy tale. They have done quite well with their Royal Tourism economy. So many seem to like the pomp regardless of the circumstance.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, September 8, 2014 10:25:21 PM

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Wisdom of Josh wrote:
Does anyone think that in 2014 a "queen" is anything other than fancy window-dressing?


I have some friends who take their queenliness very seriously. Angel
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