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Flower Power: Dandelion Tires Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Flower Power: Dandelion Tires

Dandelions are widely considered pesky weeds, but they have numerous uses, some of which we are just beginning to capitalize on. Until now, the tire industry has relied entirely on rubber-tree plantations in Southeast Asia for its natural rubber. However, researchers have been working to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan that yields tire-grade rubber and have achieved per-hectare yields on par with rubber-tree plantations, suggesting the flower is a viable alternative source of natural rubber. It may not be long before dandelion fields begin cropping up across the US and Europe to keep the wheels of the tire industry turning. More...
moniquester
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 4:09:13 AM

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Dear little dandelion! I always had high hopes for you! Now you are beginning to prove yourself. Bravo!!! little fighter! Keep up the good work! They will love you yet! Your days of abuse are almost behind you!

Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause
socratoad
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 5:32:30 AM

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Location: Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Applause
the
moniquester wrote:
Dear little dandelion! I always had high hopes for you! Now you are beginning to prove yourself. Bravo!!! little fighter! Keep up the good work! They will love you yet! Your days of abuse are almost behind you!

Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause


Bravo Applause Applause Applause Applause
MechPebbles
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 6:40:10 AM

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Hopefully, farmers don't sacrifice food crops for this.
early_apex
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 8:35:09 AM
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It all sounds good so long as the tires don't go to seed and go "poof".
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 10:11:07 AM

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Blow-outs might be messy, but entertaining to see.
Alexander Lo
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 11:23:08 AM

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Location: Pasadena, California, United States
I do not see the article stated any advantages of using dandelion to make tires. Can anyone enlighten me?
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:46:41 PM

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Alexander Lo wrote:
I do not see the article stated any advantages of using dandelion to make tires. Can anyone enlighten me?


The advantages come in the form of an additional source of natural rubber supply. Further, the fungus that troubles rubber trees in Brazil is avoided, and the wild price swings caused by bad weather, or politics, can also be ameliorated by another supply source.

In addition, a new cash crop comes to the market for farmers looking for alternative sources of income. A new industry springs up, providing jobs in many fields, plus new tax revenue at all levels of society. There are probably many more advantages I haven't even thought of as yet.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 2:15:35 PM

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Location: Apache Junction, Arizona, United States
My German mother use to send me a large vacant lot near our home, in northern Minnesota, to pick the younger dandelion leaves, which she would add to our nightly salads. Back then, the only lettuce that was available, c. 1949's was iceberg. At the time I thought mom was a little "nuts", but I liked the taste of the dandelion greens and usually did what mom told me to do; then only years later was I to discover that her parents had homesteaded in Colorado & had lived in a 1/2 sod house for the required 5 year period. About 30 years ago, I read about the nutritional value of dandelion greens, and to this day;( I allow them to grow in a very small section in my yard) the vast majority of American's spray poison on this lovely little plant, thereby also killing bees & butterfly's. Go figure; I wonder if there is some type of a breakdown in our educational system or is it just way to much (stupid) home schooling? What do you all think???
Saad Shams Nebula
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:45:45 PM

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What are the special uses?
nkelsey
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 5:44:00 PM
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Useful weed.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 6:48:05 PM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
"Dandelion Principle"

Understanding the Dandelion Metaphor

The dandelion might seem an odd choice for a workplace metaphor. To many people, the dandelion is a nuisance, a weed that can spoil a beautiful green lawn. But the dandelion has many positive characteristics. The roots can be roasted to make a coffee substitute. The leaves are edible and can be used in soups; they are excellent sources of calcium, potassium, iron and manganese and full of vitamins A, C, E, K, riboflavin and beta-carotene. Researchers in Canada are even studying whether an extract from dandelion roots could have cancer-combating potential.

Given its inherent positive qualities, you might wonder why the dandelion is considered a weed. The answer has to do with context: Within a carefully maintained lawn, the yellow dandelion, with its jagged leaves and long stalk, is out of place. However, in contexts that don’t call for uniformity, we can appreciate the dandelion’s distinctive attributes.

In many ways, Specialisterne’s people with autism spectrum disorders were like weeds that didn’t fit into standard job categories. But once the company designed contexts that were aligned with the individuals’ tendencies and abilities, the people who didn’t fit in elsewhere were able to add a lot of value. The company’s logo depicts a dandelion seed, sailing in the wind in search of a place to thrive and grow.

http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/the-dandelion-principle-redesigning-work-for-the-innovation-economy/
Vicki Holzknecht
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 9:59:08 PM

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Location: Sylva, North Carolina, United States
Who would have thunked it ?
Alexander Lo
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 11:50:26 PM

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Location: Pasadena, California, United States
To FounDit: Thank you for the reply. Applause
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