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Toxic Gas Erupts from Lake Nyos (1986) Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Toxic Gas Erupts from Lake Nyos (1986)

Lake Nyos is a deep lake located in the crater of an inactive volcano in Cameroon. A pocket of magma beneath the lake leaks carbon dioxide (CO2) into the water. In 1986, possibly as the result of a landslide, Lake Nyos suddenly emitted about 1.6 million tons of CO2. Denser than air, the CO2 cloud "hugged" the ground and descended down nearby valleys, suffocating approximately 1,700 people within 16 miles (25 km) of the lake. What methods are being used to prevent future disasters here? More...
MechPebbles
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 2:08:38 AM

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What a way to die! At least, it's not painful.
Alexander Ivanov
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 2:37:29 AM

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MechPebbles wrote:
What a way to die! At least, it's not painful.

Pray Nature is powerful.
JUSTIN Excellence
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 7:10:18 AM

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Location: Veinau, Baden-Wuerttemberg Region, Germany

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stefan
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 7:51:32 AM

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To prevent a recurrence, a degassing tube that siphons water from the bottom layers of water to the top allowing the carbon dioxide to leak in safe quantities was installed in 2001, and two additional tubes were installed in 2011.
Vicki Holzknecht
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 9:04:49 AM

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I think most lakes are formed by volcanoes.
Gary98
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 9:38:01 AM

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Truly sad. RIP to those who was caught in it
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 12:18:45 PM

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The Lake Nyos Disaster

The exact cause of the gas release at Lake Nyos is still unresolved. One theory is that a small confined area of the lake released gas allowing for the stratification in Lake Nyos to remain (Kanari, 1989). Another theory describes a slow influx of heat into the system causing instability (Kling, 1989). A landslide within the lake is another possible explanation for the displacement of the bottom CO2 saturated layers in Lake Nyos. Evidence of water surges on the southern shore of the lake suggest a possible seiche motion of the lake waters (Kanari, 1989). In all situations, the possibility of a volcanic injection is ruled out. High concentrations of reduced iron were found in Lake Nyos, the presence of which cannot be explained by the possibility of a volcanic injection into the lake (Kling, 1989). In general, a gradual heating from below the lake is widely accepted as the cause for rollover and or gas release.


The gas killed all living things within a 15-mile (25km) radius of the lake


http://www.geo.arizona.edu/geo5xx/geos577/projects/kayzar/html/lake_nyos_disaster.html
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 7:43:55 PM

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I believe there was a TV program/documentary about this tragedy some years ago. My questions is, what if any has been done in the Yellowstone Nat. Park area regarding the possibility of a similar disaster occurring there?

Having grown up in the Minnesota, traveled to Yellowstone numerous times as a child and worked as a "ski bum" in Red Lodge Montana, not much more then a stones throw from Yellowstone, I wonder if there isn't an "accident-waiting-to-happen" in that beautiful area. If anyone has any knowledge regarding my query, drop me a note. I can be located through numerous websites. Peace my friends and keep the faith.
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