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Wisdom is a sacred communion. Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, August 1, 2014 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
Wisdom is a sacred communion.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885)
JUSTIN Excellence
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 2:15:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/25/2014
Posts: 401
Neurons: 2,787
Location: Veinau, Baden-Wuerttemberg Region, Germany

"What! enjoin you upon the people righteousness and you forget your own selves? Yet you read the scripture? What?! Do you not understand?!" (H.Q. 2:44)

"And shake towards thee the trunk of the palm-tree, it will drop on thee dates fresh (and) ripe. Then eat and drink and refresh the eye..." (Quran, 19:25-26)


Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 3:37:41 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 3,378
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Then perhaps foolishness is a lay communion.
walirlan
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 5:15:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/18/2014
Posts: 305
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Location: Mayo, Connaught, Ireland
Nonsense!
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 8:17:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,241
Neurons: 6,704,770
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Read the quote in its context from Les Miserables Volume I (Fantine) Chapter 6 (Last Paragraph):
Absolutely overwhelming, words of a genius!

"Man lives by affirmation even more than by bread.
Even to see and to show does not suffice. Philosophy should be an energy; it should have for effort and effect to ameliorate the condition of man. Socrates should enter into Adam and produce Marcus Aurelius; in other words, the man of wisdom should be made to emerge from the man of felicity. Eden should be changed into a Lyceum. Science should be a cordial. To enjoy, what a sad aim, and what a paltry ambition! The brute enjoys. To offer thought to the thirst of men, to give them all as an elixir the notion of God, to make conscience and science fraternize in them, to render them just by this mysterious confrontation; such is the function of real philosophy. Morality is a blossoming out of truths. Contemplation leads to action. The absolute should be practicable. It is necessary that the ideal should be breathable, drinkable, and eatable to
the human mind. It is the ideal which has the right to say: Take, this is my body, this is my blood. Wisdom is a holy communion. It is on this condition that it ceases to be a sterile love of science and becomes the one and sovereign mode of human rallying, and that philosophy herself is promoted to religion.

Philosophy should not be a corbel erected on mystery to gaze upon it at its ease, without any other result than that of being convenient to curiosity.

For our part, adjourning the development of our thought to another occasion, we will confine ourselves to saying that we neither understand man as a point of departure nor progress as an end, without those two forces which are their two motors: faith and love.
Progress is the goal, the ideal is the type.

What is this ideal? It is God. Ideal, absolute, perfection, infinity: identical words."

Read the book here:

http://www.keframacollege.org/library/Les%20Miserables.pdf
Camila Bernardino
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 9:09:35 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/13/2014
Posts: 9
Neurons: 20,716
Location: São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Thank you, monamagda! I've always wanted to read this book, but now I'm certain that I have to read it. And I think that wisdom should serve all, since what you once learn can never be robbed from you.
DOUGLAS CAMPOS
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 10:24:26 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/8/2014
Posts: 13
Neurons: 16,730
Location: Marília, Sao Paulo, Brazil
truth!Applause Applause
Fayme Rose
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 11:01:30 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/2/2014
Posts: 34
Neurons: 320
Location: New York City, New York, United States
Wisdom is a sacred communion that I feel should reflect a sincere devotion to God. It should reflect your interaction with people as you offer to do good deeds.Applause
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 12:09:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,241
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Camila Bernardino wrote:
Thank you, monamagda! I've always wanted to read this book, but now I'm certain that I have to read it. And I think that wisdom should serve all, since what you once learn can never be robbed from you.


De nada Camila! Não podemos passar por esta vida sem ler Les Miserables!

This is one of the books we must read in our time-life!!!
capitán
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 1:52:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/18/2013
Posts: 495
Neurons: 28,396
Location: San Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador
monamagda wrote:
Camila Bernardino wrote:
Thank you, monamagda! I've always wanted to read this book, but now I'm certain that I have to read it. And I think that wisdom should serve all, since what you once learn can never be robbed from you.


De nada Camila! Não podemos passar por esta vida sem ler Les Miserables!

This is one of the books we must read in our time-life!!!

--- --- ---

It's been a long time since I haven't had much time to partake in this forum as I would like to.
And it feels great when I read everybody's posts, especially yours, monamagda, with context and as sharp as usual.

Every second of the day by day is made up of a continuos search for affirmation.
I know this; I live this, trapped inside my skin every single second of my existence.
And I know it will keep on going until my soul brims out of my skin, one good day.

I enjoyed especially the words:
"Socrates should enter into Adam and produce Marcus Aurelius;
in other words, the man of wisdom should be made to emerge from the man of felicity."

I mean, you are not happy in truth, right? At least not until you know why you are happy about (if such thing is actually possible).

What god, then, is capable of assuaging mankind's thirst of affirmation.
What god, then, is actually capable of slaking the boundless thirst of the infinite human soul?
Alexander Lo
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 2:54:39 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/14/2014
Posts: 267
Neurons: 86,669
Location: Pasadena, California, United States
monamagda wrote:
Read the quote in its context from Les Miserables Volume I (Fantine) Chapter 6 (Last Paragraph):
Absolutely overwhelming, words of a genius!

"Man lives by affirmation even more than by bread.
Even to see and to show does not suffice. Philosophy should be an energy; it should have for effort and effect to ameliorate the condition of man. Socrates should enter into Adam and produce Marcus Aurelius; in other words, the man of wisdom should be made to emerge from the man of felicity. Eden should be changed into a Lyceum. Science should be a cordial. To enjoy, what a sad aim, and what a paltry ambition! The brute enjoys. To offer thought to the thirst of men, to give them all as an elixir the notion of God, to make conscience and science fraternize in them, to render them just by this mysterious confrontation; such is the function of real philosophy. Morality is a blossoming out of truths. Contemplation leads to action. The absolute should be practicable. It is necessary that the ideal should be breathable, drinkable, and eatable to
the human mind. It is the ideal which has the right to say: Take, this is my body, this is my blood. Wisdom is a holy communion. It is on this condition that it ceases to be a sterile love of science and becomes the one and sovereign mode of human rallying, and that philosophy herself is promoted to religion.

Philosophy should not be a corbel erected on mystery to gaze upon it at its ease, without any other result than that of being convenient to curiosity.

For our part, adjourning the development of our thought to another occasion, we will confine ourselves to saying that we neither understand man as a point of departure nor progress as an end, without those two forces which are their two motors: faith and love.
Progress is the goal, the ideal is the type.

What is this ideal? It is God. Ideal, absolute, perfection, infinity: identical words."

Read the book here:

http://www.keframacollege.org/library/Les%20Miserables.pdf


Thank you for your post and your link.
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 5:07:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,241
Neurons: 6,704,770
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Boo hoo!

Alexander Lo wrote:
monamagda wrote:
Read the quote in its context from Les Miserables Volume I (Fantine) Chapter 6 (Last Paragraph):
Absolutely overwhelming, words of a genius!

"Man lives by affirmation even more than by bread.
Even to see and to show does not suffice. Philosophy should be an energy; it should have for effort and effect to ameliorate the condition of man. Socrates should enter into Adam and produce Marcus Aurelius; in other words, the man of wisdom should be made to emerge from the man of felicity. Eden should be changed into a Lyceum. Science should be a cordial. To enjoy, what a sad aim, and what a paltry ambition! The brute enjoys. To offer thought to the thirst of men, to give them all as an elixir the notion of God, to make conscience and science fraternize in them, to render them just by this mysterious confrontation; such is the function of real philosophy. Morality is a blossoming out of truths. Contemplation leads to action. The absolute should be practicable. It is necessary that the ideal should be breathable, drinkable, and eatable to
the human mind. It is the ideal which has the right to say: Take, this is my body, this is my blood. Wisdom is a holy communion. It is on this condition that it ceases to be a sterile love of science and becomes the one and sovereign mode of human rallying, and that philosophy herself is promoted to religion.

Philosophy should not be a corbel erected on mystery to gaze upon it at its ease, without any other result than that of being convenient to curiosity.

For our part, adjourning the development of our thought to another occasion, we will confine ourselves to saying that we neither understand man as a point of departure nor progress as an end, without those two forces which are their two motors: faith and love.
Progress is the goal, the ideal is the type.

What is this ideal? It is God. Ideal, absolute, perfection, infinity: identical words."

Read the book here:

http://www.keframacollege.org/library/Les%20Miserables.pdf


Thank you for your post and your link.
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 5:25:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,241
Neurons: 6,704,770
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Thank you so much for your comments! I so like to read yours.
About Marcus Aurelius, the quote of Victor Hugo it is so perfect!! Since the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius was also a Stoic philosopher he wrote "Meditations" which give us a unique opportunity to see how an ancient person (indeed an emperor) might try to live a Stoic life, according to which only virtue is good, only vice is bad, and the things which we busy ourselves with are all indifferent. VH was a deep connoisseur of Marcus work!!


capitán wrote:
monamagda wrote:
Camila Bernardino wrote:
Thank you, monamagda! I've always wanted to read this book, but now I'm certain that I have to read it. And I think that wisdom should serve all, since what you once learn can never be robbed from you.


De nada Camila! Não podemos passar por esta vida sem ler Les Miserables!

This is one of the books we must read in our time-life!!!

--- --- ---

It's been a long time since I haven't had much time to partake in this forum as I would like to.
And it feels great when I read everybody's posts, especially yours, monamagda, with context and as sharp as usual.

Every second of the day by day is made up of a continuos search for affirmation.
I know this; I live this, trapped inside my skin every single second of my existence.
And I know it will keep on going until my soul brims out of my skin, one good day.

I enjoyed especially the words:
"Socrates should enter into Adam and produce Marcus Aurelius;
in other words, the man of wisdom should be made to emerge from the man of felicity."

I mean, you are not happy in truth, right? At least not until you know why you are happy about (if such thing is actually possible).

What god, then, is capable of assuaging mankind's thirst of affirmation.
What god, then, is actually capable of slaking the boundless thirst of the infinite human soul?
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, August 3, 2014 6:08:04 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,240
Neurons: 248,542
With cross reference to The Word of the Day, 'Castigate', and indeed if "Wisdom is a holy communion" (sharing):

How does one tell someone else-- found in an "unholy communion with wisdom" a few times already-- discretely, gently, without castigating: Stop plagiarizing and flaunting it on this site.

We are here to learn from the site and from one another, to grow with our own thoughts being challenged by these quotations, to read the works of authors whence they came.
And if we copy and paste from what others wrote, we must also quote, provide the relevant attribution, and give credit to the words of others. Surely, we can do that!

monamagda wrote Saturday, August 02, 2014 1:25:58 PM: ..." Since the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius was also a Stoic philosopher he wrote "Meditations" which give us a unique opportunity to see how an ancient person (indeed an emperor) might try to live a Stoic life, according to which only virtue is good, only vice is bad, and the things which we busy ourselves with are all indifferent." ...

The source of most of that, word for word, a bit more elegantly constructed, was here; thank you Stanford: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/marcus-aurelius/


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