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Maximilien Robespierre Guillotined (1794) Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Maximilien Robespierre Guillotined (1794)

Known as "the Incorruptible" for his emphasis on civic morality, Robespierre became one of the leading figures of the French Revolution. He was an influential member of the Committee of Public Safety, the political body that controlled France during the bloody revolutionary period known as the "Reign of Terror." However, popular discontent with the committee's brutal measures soon grew, and Robespierre was guillotined in the coup of 9 Thermidor. What might have been his last words? More...
MechPebbles
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 3:25:54 AM

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A deserving end.
stefan
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 6:42:06 AM

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Robespierre's last recorded words may have been "Merci, monsieur," to a man that had given him a handkerchief for the blood on his face and clothing
TheParser
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 6:57:14 AM
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The French Revolution seems to teach us that EVOLUTION, not REVOLUTION, is the better way to change things.

Just consider the various bloody revolutions during the last 100 years. Did they bring in a wonderful new democratic government? I cannot think of one. Instead, the new government often turned out to be worse than the one overthrown by the revolution.

England, on the other hand, chose evolution. Slowly but surely the English people got more freedom and equality during the 19th and 20th centuries.
curmudgeonine
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 9:13:06 AM

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Merci, monsieur may have been his last words
Pieter_Hove
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 1:19:20 PM

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What, then, might be the formula of evolution, Parser? I thought evolution has rather a passive meaning; something that is inevitable. Like in: the evolution of human mankind. Maybe you are thinking of democracy as a political institution (or formula; I'm not skilled in politics).



TheParser wrote:
The French Revolution seems to teach us that EVOLUTION, not REVOLUTION, is the better way to change things.

Just consider the various bloody revolutions during the last 100 years. Did they bring in a wonderful new democratic government? I cannot think of one. Instead, the new government often turned out to be worse than the one overthrown by the revolution.

England, on the other hand, chose evolution. Slowly but surely the English people got more freedom and equality during the 19th and 20th centuries.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 8:28:53 PM

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-The importance of Rousseau and his teachings to Robespierre cannot be overemphasized. Perhaps it can best be seen in Robespierre's own writing about the philosopher, from his diary during the Estates-General:

"Divine man! It was you who taught me to know myself. When I was young you brought me to appreciate the true dignity of my nature and to reflect on the great principles which govern the social order . . . . I saw you in your last days and for me the recollection of the time will always be a source of proud joy. I contemplated your august features and saw there the imprint of those dark griefs which the injustice of man inflicted on you."

http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1983-4/mcletchie.htm
excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:57:20 AM

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How ironic. They brutally killed the brutal measures guy. Plus ca change...
excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:59:53 AM

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TheParser wrote:
The French Revolution seems to teach us that EVOLUTION, not REVOLUTION, is the better way to change things.

Just consider the various bloody revolutions during the last 100 years. Did they bring in a wonderful new democratic government? I cannot think of one. Instead, the new government often turned out to be worse than the one overthrown by the revolution.

England, on the other hand, chose evolution. Slowly but surely the English people got more freedom and equality during the 19th and 20th centuries.



Apart from the 860 000 casualties and one dead king during the English Civil War it was very peaceful.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:02:19 AM
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Flam boyant wrote:


I'm not skilled in politics.



Neither am I, Flam boyant.

As a layman, I was just trying to say that the slow development of freedom was probably better than a fast, dramatic revolution.

In regard to England, I was referring to the 19th and 20th centuries (not to the earlier periods of English history, as another poster implied).

The French Revolution was bloody and led to Napoleon (and his failures).

In England, however, changes came very slowly and usually without bloodshed:

More men were permitted to vote.

Newspapers were allowed to circulate without that special tax (the stamp).

Elections to Parliament were cleaned up.

Women were allowed to vote in the early 20th century.

Free medical care was introduced after World War II.

******

I cannot think of one successful bloody revolution.

Some people say that the American Revolution was successful. But if the Americans had never revolted, probably there would never have been the horrific (horrific!) Civil War.

Look at Canada. It did NOT revolt. And slowly -- through "evolution" -- it gained more and more independence. So today it's a completely independent country (although Canadians still maintain the charming fiction of being Her Majesty's subjects).

James

excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 12:18:59 PM

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Ah, yes. I was a little confused because the French Revolution was, of course, an eighteenth century event. As was the American version of same ( without so much of the whole guillotining thing ).
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