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where the wild things are. Options
prolixitysquared
Posted: Saturday, April 11, 2009 7:05:43 PM
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Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,035
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Location: pennsylvania.
How strange-- I just thought to ask if anyone (or everyone !) was raised on the book Where the Wild Things Are as children. I remember having the book read to me many times before bed when I was little.

I just Googled the title only to discover that apparently this year, a movie was made out of the book.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0386117/

So far, all the first names I've noticed are of decently well known actors.

October 2009 !
Toadfoot
Posted: Saturday, April 11, 2009 11:54:27 PM
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Location: canada
I grew up with it too, and I passed it on to my own son. Maurice Sendak ( Illustrator of Little Bear) wrote and illustrated it. It has been critically acclaimed for its illustration technique. I especially like the fact that as Max's imagination grows, the illustrations begin to cover more and more of the page, then retreat again when he returns to the "real" world. Movie huh? is it animated?
Drew
Posted: Sunday, April 12, 2009 10:13:40 AM
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Location: United States
I've seen a trailer for the movie. It's a live-action film, directed by Spike Jonze. I'm very intrigued about it.
Toadfoot
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 1:20:11 AM
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Location: canada
Indeed...
MiTziGo
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 2:42:02 PM
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Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,391
Neurons: 6,142
There are a number of classic children's books I can't imagine having grown up without. Among them are The Little Engine that Could and Goodnight Moon. What other children's books have a special place in your heart?
prolixitysquared
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 7:06:15 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,035
Neurons: 3,101
Location: pennsylvania.
MichalG wrote:
There are a number of classic children's books I can't imagine having grown up without. Among them are The Little Engine that Could and Goodnight Moon. What other children's books have a special place in your heart?


One book I remember adoring was Catwings. It may have been a series or had sequels ?

It wasn't from when I was very young, but young enough.

My one niece later read it and loved it too. We didn't know about it until we were both older, and we reminisced !
catskincatskin
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 7:41:45 PM
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Joined: 3/19/2009
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Neurons: 261
Location: United States
Harold and the Purple Crayon and Blueberries for Sal are two that I recall fondly.
Toadfoot
Posted: Wednesday, April 15, 2009 12:11:26 AM
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Neurons: 30
Location: canada
The Snowy Day, Alligator Pie, and most other nonsense verse: Mother Goose &c.
Lindamarie
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 8:44:53 AM
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Joined: 4/7/2009
Posts: 14
Neurons: 42
Location: United States
I remember when I learned how to read in kindergarten - I decided that I was going to read the whole Bible that night. This new "power" was awesome! (I made it to chapter 5 in Genesis that night, skipping over a few of the names.)

Children's books I discovered and read over and over were Heidi, Old Yeller, and the Little House series.
Ian Pean
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2009 10:14:28 AM
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Joined: 3/27/2009
Posts: 11
Neurons: 33
Location: United States
I grew up on Bible stories for children and the missing piece also I loved harold and the purple crayon as a kid
risadr
Posted: Friday, April 24, 2009 10:47:46 AM
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I was so excited when I found out that they were making a film version of Where the Wild Things Are. Now, I'm waiting for film versions of my other childhood favorites: Harold and the Purple Crayon and The Giving Tree.

My daughter also has copies of both of these, as well as Goodnight Moon and others that my husband and I read as children. At 18-months-old, when most children prefer television, because it's more accessible, my daughter would much rather read a book with her Mama. It makes my heart all warm and fuzzy.
Luftmarque
Posted: Saturday, April 25, 2009 7:40:52 PM

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Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
risadr wrote:
I was so excited when I found out that they were making a film version of Where the Wild Things Are. Now, I'm waiting for film versions of my other childhood favorites: Harold and the Purple Crayon and The Giving Tree.

My daughter also has copies of both of these, as well as Goodnight Moon and others that my husband and I read as children. At 18-months-old, when most children prefer television, because it's more accessible, my daughter would much rather read a book with her Mama. It makes my heart all warm and fuzzy.

This reminds me of the "babbling" topic (ah, those were the days). One thing I do remember from my readings on language development is that the single best predictor of success in reading is the amount of time that parents and other caregivers spend reading with their children.
nxt_annawintour
Posted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 11:25:40 AM
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Location: United States
Where the Wild Things Are is my favorite book, hands down. Anyone remember Where the Sidewalk Ends? I still have it, open it up from time to time - can't wait to pass it on to my kids.
MiTziGo
Posted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 12:10:46 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,391
Neurons: 6,142
Shel Silverstein is brilliant. I remember always loving this poem, so please bear with me:
Quote:
Sick
'I cannot go to school today, '
Said little Peggy Ann McKay.
'I have the measles and the mumps,
A gash, a rash and purple bumps.
My mouth is wet, my throat is dry,
I'm going blind in my right eye.
My tonsils are as big as rocks,
I've counted sixteen chicken pox
And there's one more-that's seventeen,
And don't you think my face looks green?
My leg is cut-my eyes are blue-
It might be instamatic flu.
I cough and sneeze and gasp and choke,
I'm sure that my left leg is broke-
My hip hurts when I move my chin,
My belly button's caving in,
My back is wrenched, my ankle's sprained,
My 'pendix pains each time it rains.
My nose is cold, my toes are numb.
I have a sliver in my thumb.
My neck is stiff, my voice is weak,
I hardly whisper when I speak.
My tongue is filling up my mouth,
I think my hair is falling out.
My elbow's bent, my spine ain't straight,
My temperature is one-o-eight.
My brain is shrunk, I cannot hear,
There is a hole inside my ear.
I have a hangnail, and my heart is-what?
What's that? What's that you say?
You say today is...Saturday?
G'bye, I'm going out to play! '
Kat
Posted: Tuesday, June 9, 2009 1:08:11 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/19/2009
Posts: 878
Neurons: 3,389
prolixitysquared wrote:
How strange-- I just thought to ask if anyone (or everyone !) was raised on the book Where the Wild Things Are as children. I remember having the book read to me many times before bed when I was little.

I just Googled the title only to discover that apparently this year, a movie was made out of the book.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0386117/

So far, all the first names I've noticed are of decently well known actors.

October 2009 !



I read "Where the Wild Things Are" to my son when he was little. (over and over)
I believe Maurice Sendak wrote another popular children's book...Do you
remember what the title is?


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