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Quamquat/Orange Options
Inlimica02
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 3:44:47 PM
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Joined: 2/11/2010
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Location: United Kingdom
What is the difference between a Quamquat and an Orange???
Christine
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 4:11:31 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/3/2009
Posts: 3,917
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Can't you look up this on Google?
Galad
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 4:15:10 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2009
Posts: 2,582
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Location: Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Christine wrote:
Can't you look up this on Google?


Here you go:

THIS

pron. pl. these (z)
1.
a. Used to refer to the person or thing present, nearby, or just mentioned: This is my cat. These are my tools.
b. Used to refer to what is about to be said: Now don't laugh when you hear this.
c. Used to refer to the present event, action, or time: said he'd be back before this.
2. Used to indicate the nearer or the more immediate one: This is mine and that is yours.
adj. pl. these
1. Being just mentioned or present in space, time, or thought: She left early this morning.
2. Being nearer or more immediate: this side and that side.
3. Being about to be stated or described: Just wait till you hear this story.
4. Informal Used as an emphatic substitute for the indefinite article: looking for this book of recipes.
adv.
To this extent; so: never stayed out this late.

Whistle
nooblet
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 4:57:21 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/15/2009
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Location: United States
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Qumquat

It's closely related to the Citrus family, but it is actually party of the Fortunella family. Also, they're smaller and more oval-shaped than oranges are. And naturally, the seeds from the qumquat grow into qumquat trees while the seeds from oranges grow into orange trees. There are probably other differences as well, I skimmed over the first paragraph or so.
KenMac
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 5:07:02 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/11/2010
Posts: 5
Neurons: 15
Location: United States
Some glaziers left a panel of plate glass in a meadow. Not long after, a flock of birds were flying through the meadow on their way home. All but one flew into the glass and got knocked senseless. The lucky one flew on home and excitedly described his flock's tragic thrill flight. "It was amazing, the air just crystallized on them." The leader of the flock was skeptical, of course. "I doubt that," he said, "but we need to go check it out. Come on everybody, lets go." All but one shouted enthusiastically. The one said, "I think maybe I'll stay behind, if that's OK with you." "OK, be a lily livered coward if you must, but prepare to live in disgrace." "I understand, but I just think I'll stay here." All the other birds set out for the meadow, all ran into the glass and were knocked senseless.

Moral: He who hesitates is sometimes saved.

(Paraphrased from one of James Thurber's Fables For Our Time.)
nooblet
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 5:12:46 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/15/2009
Posts: 1,570
Neurons: 4,778
Location: United States
KenMac wrote:
Some glaziers left a panel of plate glass in a meadow. Not long after, a flock of birds were flying through the meadow on their way home. All but one flew into the glass and got knocked senseless. The lucky one flew on home and excitedly described his flock's tragic thrill flight. "It was amazing, the air just crystallized on them." The leader of the flock was skeptical, of course. "I doubt that," he said, "but we need to go check it out. Come on everybody, lets go." All but one shouted enthusiastically. The one said, "I think maybe I'll stay behind, if that's OK with you." "OK, be a lily livered coward if you must, but prepare to live in disgrace." "I understand, but I just think I'll stay here." All the other birds set out for the meadow, all ran into the glass and were knocked senseless.

Moral: He who hesitates is sometimes saved.

(Paraphrased from one of James Thurber's Fables For Our Time.)


I think that you meant to post that in this thread.
Geeman
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 5:55:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2009
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Location: Whittier, California, United States
Inlimica02 wrote:
What is the difference between a Quamquat and an Orange???

Quamquat is much, much funnier to say out loud.
Nibbles
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:43:40 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2009
Posts: 434
I must agree, as Quamquat may be construed as kumquat or cumquat. Oh, a pome by any other name is so much like an apple, yet a kumquat like an orange is really an Hesperidium.

Then there are pomegrantes, but that is a berry different story.



Geeman wrote:
Inlimica02 wrote:
What is the difference between a Quamquat and an Orange???

Quamquat is much, much funnier to say out loud.
matthewfarmer
Posted: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:58:16 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/11/2010
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United States
Ok ..ok...i'm going to give non-hort/botanical response.,..,, rather here's a personal feed written as experiential....

SO growing up in northern new hampshire in the 70's my uncle tony would bring home what we considered exotica of all sorts.,, (land snails, trotters, kumquats) at the time and as a youth they were,,in reality now @ current.,, they are the norm in most cool grocers/markets.. ....

a kumquat is a rather bitter fruit that is obviously citrus as far as it's taxonomy is concerned., it is most interesting to me then and still now because it is so tastefully converse to the common orange(or commercial oranges as we know them)...Now the orange is an entirely edible fruit,, 'cept most of us don't eat the whole fruit due to the bitter nature of the pith and rind,, but it's the juicy pulp and juice itself that we so so soverymuch desire... you can make a delicious preserve or marmalade w/ the rind however.., anyway.. ..anywayss

The KUMQUAT has a bitter and pithy(juiceless) INNER cavity whereas the rind/skin is FULL of yummy citrus sugars.. sweet as can be,, the skin of a kumquat has a floral taste and is quite remarkable... for sure it is a fruit that makes little sense,,, i bet animals love them!!!,,, i love them!!! & due to the concentrated flavor and sugars/bitterness, i would be willing to bet that they have 12times the amount of vitamin per weight ratio............. it's nice to see them in markets more universally these days... if ever you can't find them goto your chinatown or asian grocer especially.... they are SO in season at current and by weight they are SO damn cheap,,, it's not even funny....!!!! enjoy..
Tovarish
Posted: Friday, February 12, 2010 1:49:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 11,101
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
Where is Dreamy???
Kumquats are usually grown for their decorative benefits, in pots etc.
Awful to eat, bitter little devils, unless you put them down with a liquor, say Cointreau or Vodka.
Angus
Posted: Friday, February 12, 2010 4:32:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/13/2009
Posts: 294
Neurons: 5,146
Totally agree with matthewfarmer: You peel them and either throw away the insides or use them as a bitter-tart flavoring in a recipe involving lots of sugar and/or alcohol. The rinds are sweet and delicious - even to children - unless you have a bad supplier. That said, if sweetened or used in moderation, the whole fruit, like limes and lemons, can be the basis for a wide variety of wonderful concoctions.
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