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Roops
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 2:06:34 AM
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In the forum, one of the member has used the term veer off as-
I realize that this thread has veered off.
I searched for its meaning in TFD: veer off from-to turn or steer sharply away from someone or something. How does this match in the context?

Regards,
excaelis
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 3:02:03 AM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
It is used to express the opinion that the thread has strayed from its original subject and into an unrelated topic.
thar
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 4:39:05 AM

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the thread has one direction, straight on to the 'answer'- if at some point it moves away into a different direction, then you can say it veers off.



Usually when someone posts an interesting point and people start to explore that new direction.
Roops
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 5:31:02 AM
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Joined: 6/13/2013
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Thank you thar & ex
shahidmost
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 6:22:44 AM

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Location: Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
**

The phrases veer off commonly means to change direction or purpose. Then, when terms like this become properly established in a language they become commonly available to be used symbolically. For instance, it is common to say:

A man passed through the football ground.

But then, we borrow the phrase pass through to say:

A thought passed through my mind.

Now, we know the mind is is not exactly like football pitch and thoughts do not exactly walk through places. Then, we use the phrases like pass through, veer off, wander off, spring into action, etcetera to capture the abstract side of certain happenings.

If by the thread you mean the thread of conversation on a public forum, then I think it is quite fitting to say the thread veered off the original line of discussion, or that, the thread veered off the scope of the topic.

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