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Gordon Freeman
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 7:51:54 AM

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Is there such thing as a chandler in modern use?

The dictionary says chandlers once sold or sell either seafaring equipment or candles, soap and the like,

but one of these seems to be obsolete. So what do they commonly sell?
jcbarros
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 8:10:21 AM

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Raymond?
rogermue
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 8:14:00 AM

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An old word. Longman says, chandler: someone who made or sold candles in the past. See also ship's chandler.

I guess "chandler is actually two words. One derived from Latin candela meaning candle and the other one connected with German Händler meaning merchant, dealer, used in special sectors.
Various dictionaries have entries that differ slightly and there seems to be different use in BrE and AmE. So you should see an American dictionary also.
Toffeeapple
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 8:17:36 AM

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I know of several ship's chandlers on the coast of Great Britain.
NancyUK
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 8:20:49 AM
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Toffeeapple wrote:
I know of several ship's chandlers on the coast of Great Britain.


Yes, and they are to be found on rivers too.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 8:27:18 AM

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Hi Marksman.

I think you might still find the occasional chandler's shop - more likely the "general hardware" sort of shop (candles, cleaning materials, barbecue equipment and fuels and so on) - not the ship's ropes, except in yachting marinas or traditional boating towns.

The actual word does not have any "specialisation" - you could have a "ship's chandler" - selling ropes and sails, or a "gardener's chandler" - selling gardening equipment, or any other sort of chandler.

Quote:
chandler n
1. (Commerce) a dealer in a specified trade or merchandise: corn chandler; ship's chandler.
2. (Crafts) a person who makes or sells candles
3. (Commerce) Brit a retailer of grocery provisions; shopkeeper
Collins

Now it is very uncommon.



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Mr Epstein
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 11:41:23 AM

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Location: San Francisco, California, United States
marksman wrote:
Is there such thing as a chandler in modern use?

The dictionary says chandlers once sold or sell either seafaring equipment or candles, soap and the like,

but one of these seems to be obsolete. So what do they commonly sell?


Marksman,

In the USA you would be correct, this would be an archaic or obsolete term.

No one in boating ever references going to a "chandler" for equipment.

Going to a store or supplier yes, but chandler...no.

Now in other counties this older term may still be in use.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 12:05:42 PM
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Well, as the other Brits said, ...yep, chandlers still exist in Britain. Actually, as I sit here at the office window there are a couple even within walking distance.

I seem to remember that in Australia they are still called that - but only in relation to ships/boats.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 1:36:06 PM

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If you read any of the thousands of "Oregon file" or "NUMA" books by Clive Cussler, the characters often contact the ship's chandlers to replace stuff damaged in battles with the bad guys!

Cruising Ports:Patricia Miller Rains, ‎Patricia Miller - 2000
Quote:
Prices are similar to Miami. Payment is by cash, not credit card. Greenbacks are accepted. Chandlery: A small chandlery adjacent to the marina office contains limited Cuban charts, used dive gear, some marine hardware, outboard engine oil ...


Cruising World - Jan 1988 Betsy Holman
Quote:
Big chances are you bought all your paint, hardware, charts and rope from your local chandlery.


Sailing to Hemingway's Cuba - David Schaefer - 2000
Quote:
The marina also has a friendly ship chandlery that delivers everything from ice to French and Italian wines within a few minutes of a call on Channel 77. Liquors are not taxed, so a bottle of seven-year-old Havana Club rum was $6.60

excaelis
Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 6:47:49 PM

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So, Ken, what would you call a chandler in the U.S. ? I know you guys have a fair amount of coastline down there.
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