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St. Elmo's Day Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, June 2, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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St. Elmo's Day

The day known as St. Elmo's Day is actually St. Erasmus's Day, in honor of a third-century Italian bishop who is thought to have suffered martyrdom around the year 304. Erasmus was a patron saint of sailors and was especially popular in the 13th century. Sometimes at sea on stormy nights, sailors will see a pale, brushlike spray of electricity at the top of the mast. In the Middle Ages, they believed that these fires were the souls of the departed, rising to glory through the intercession of St. Elmo. Such an electrical display is still referred to as "St. Elmo's Fire." More...
monamagda
Posted: Monday, June 2, 2014 3:16:12 PM

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St. Elmo's Fire

Early observers of the phenomenon, mostly sailors on high seas during thunderstorms, seem to have understood they weren't looking at actual fire, because instead of abandoning ship, they took comfort in the sudden glow atop the masts. Such famous figures as Magellan, Caesar and Columbus experienced St. Elmo's Fire on their journeys. And Pliny the Elder, who seems to have documented absolutely every natural phenomenon back in the 1st century A.D., beat everyone else to the punch when he described blue flames appearing out of nowhere during thunderstorms.
Sailors tended to attribute the glow to "St. Elmo," a mispronunciation of St. Ermo or St. Erasmus, the patron saint of Mediterranean sailors. They believed the fire was a sign of salvation from the saint, since the phenomenon occurs most often toward the end of a storm. Benjamin Franklin and Charles Darwin viewed the weather event through a decidedly more scientific perspective. But regardless of interpretation, it's clear they were all observing the same phenomenon. And contrary to popular belief, St. Elmo's Fire doesn't only occur at sea.
As with all electrical phenomena, St. Elmo's Fire is about electrons. So, what is St. Elmo's Fire if it's not a form of lightning? Find out in the next section.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/nature/climate-weather/atmospheric/st-elmo-fire.htm
The Realist
Posted: Monday, June 2, 2014 9:53:41 PM

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So many saints, how do we keep up with them?
Nice story.
vinay jimmy
Posted: Tuesday, June 3, 2014 12:16:30 AM
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God bless and that is a truth

Sailors on high seas during thunderstorms, seem to have understood they weren't looking at actual fire, because instead of abandoning ship, they took comfort in the sudden glow atop the masts

They believed that these fires were the souls of the departed, rising to glory through the intercession of St. Elmo
.Boo hoo!
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2015 5:29:48 AM

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Those interested in static electricity must admire this saint.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2015 9:47:46 AM
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ChristopherJohnson wrote:
Those interested in static electricity must admire this saint.



Ahh...The patron saint of Clark Maxwell. Good one Christopher.
striker
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2015 11:27:18 AM
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i love the storiers ofsuperstition
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2015 12:41:52 PM

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Saint Elmo's fire, luminous discharge of electricity extending into the atmosphere from some projecting or elevated object. It is usually observed (often during a snowstorm or a dust storm) as brushlike fiery jets extending from the tips of a ship's mast or spar, a wing, propeller, or other part of an aircraft, a steeple, a mountain top, or even from blades of grass or horns of cattle. Sometimes it plays about the head of a person, causing a tingling sensation. The phenomenon occurs when the atmosphere becomes charged and an electrical potential strong enough to cause a discharge is created between an object and the air around it. The amount of electricity involved is not great enough to be dangerous. The appearance of St. Elmo's fire is regarded as a portent of bad weather. The phenomenon, also known as corposant, was long regarded with superstitious awe.

Read more: Saint Elmo's fire http://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/weather/saint-elmo-fire.html#ixzz3bt96leRL
Stvn
Posted: Thursday, June 4, 2015 7:03:32 PM
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A wonderful stories from the history.
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