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Julius Axelrod (1912) Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Julius Axelrod (1912)

Axelrod was an American biochemist whose investigations into the role of norepinephrine in brain chemistry led to an understanding of how neurotransmitters work and how their levels are regulated. His research made possible the development of antianxiety and antidepressant drugs like Prozac and Zoloft, which are collectively known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. For his efforts, Axelrod shared the 1970 Nobel Prize for Physiology. What was his other major scientific contribution? More...
LucOneOff
Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014 2:47:59 AM

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Axelrod also made major contributions to the understanding of the pineal gland and how it is regulated during the sleep-wake cycle.

pedro
Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014 3:41:50 AM
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great name
excaelis
Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014 3:43:55 AM

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High school must have been hell.
monamagda
Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014 4:33:27 PM

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Nobel laureate Julius Axelrod of the National Institutes of Health discovered DMT in human brain tissue.

Dimethyltryptamine, or DMT. It was first synthesized by a British chemist in the 1930s, and its psychotropic properties were discovered some 20 years later by the Hungarian-born chemist Stephen Szara, who later became a researcher for the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
Why is DMT so fascinating? For starters, DMT is the only psychedelic known to occur naturally in the human body. In 1972, the Nobel laureate Julius Axelrod of the National Institutes of Health discovered DMT in human brain tissue, leading to speculation that the compound plays a role in psychosis. Research into that possibility—and into psychedelics in general–was abandoned because of the growing backlash against these compounds.

In 1990, however, Rick Strassman, a psychiatrist at the University of New Mexico, obtained permission from federal authorities to inject DMT into human volunteers. Strassman, a Buddhist, suspected that endogenous DMT might contribute to mystical experiences. From 1990 to 1995, he supervised more than 400 DMT sessions involving 60 subjects at the University of New Mexico. Many subjects reported that they dissolved blissfully into a radiant light or sensed the presence of a powerful, god-like being.

By John Horgan, a former Scientific American staff writer, directs the Center for Science Writings at Stevens Institute of Technology.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/cross-check/2010/04/16/dmt-is-in-your-head-but-it-may-be-too-weird-for-the-psychedelic-renaissance/
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