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Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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The Breakers

Built to serve as the summer home of American socialite and businessman Cornelius Vanderbilt II, the Breakers is a 70-room mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. The home was constructed in the 1890s at a cost of more than $12 million and is deemed the archetype of the Gilded Age, during which socially ambitious Americans sought to imitate the European aristocracy. Today, it is Rhode Island's most visited attraction. Why did Vanderbilt insist that wood not be used in the Breakers' construction? More...
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 1:23:52 PM

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Relationship Between the House and Sea



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According to Tschirch, one of the most important things about The Breakers is the brilliance of how the architect situated the house to take advantage of its views of the sea. The relationship between the house and the ocean is dramatic because of its 30-foot elevation, and is part of the reason that a visit here becomes so magical. It’s a visually spectacular site and the house with its marble and its colors is magnificent. The basic interior color pattern is blue-gray, rose, and green. These colors interplay beautifully with the lawns outside and the changing colors of the sea.
“I think The Breakers captures a moment in America’s culture,” said Tschirch. “The house is an emblem of the spirit of the American Renaissance.”
What house better exemplifies this movement? The exterior style is completely infused with every American technology and comfort. The mansion reflects the energy and optimism of the era and through it the classicism of the past becomes an emblem for a new America.

As the previous mansion on the property owned by Pierre Lorillard IV burned in 1892, Cornelius Vanderbilt II insisted that the building be made as fireproof as possible and as such, the structure of the building used steel trusses and no wooden parts. He even required that the furnace be located away from the house, under Ochre Point Avenue; in winter there is an area in front of the main gate over the furnace where snow and ice always melt.
jcbarros
Posted: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 1:48:32 PM

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Pathetic. ;¡
John J. Gerhardt
Posted: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 3:09:31 PM
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Location: Lafayette, Colorado, United States
Smart thinking..."As the previous mansion on the property owned by Pierre Lorillard IV burned in 1892, Cornelius Vanderbilt II insisted that the building be made as fireproof as possible and as such, the structure of the building used steel trusses and no wooden parts.
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