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where twists in the structure of the medium Options
Kurigrama
Posted: Monday, May 12, 2014 12:19:29 PM
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The observation that even-numbered groups of fermions can behave like bosons raises the corollary question of whether groups of bosons can ever exhibit fermionic characteristics. Some scientists argue for the existence of skyrmions (after the theorist Tony Skyrme who first described the behavior of these hypothetical fermion-like groups of bosons) in superconductors and other condensed-matter environments, where twists in the structure of the medium might permit skyrmions to form.


Could someone please explain the bold part? I fail to feel the logic the bold part.
moniquester
Posted: Monday, May 12, 2014 1:49:58 PM

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Kurigrama wrote:
The observation that even-numbered groups of fermions can behave like bosons raises the corollary question of whether groups of bosons can ever exhibit fermionic characteristics. Some scientists argue for the existence of skyrmions (after the theorist Tony Skyrme who first described the behavior of these hypothetical fermion-like groups of bosons) in superconductors and other condensed-matter environments, where twists in the structure of the medium might permit skyrmions to form.


Could someone please explain the bold part? I fail to feel the logic the bold part.


I think they mean twists in the molecular structure, causing differences in conductivity. When a substance is condensed, the molecular structure is necessarily altered in the "squishing" of the molecules, thus enabling these skyrmions to form.
seemo74
Posted: Monday, May 12, 2014 4:12:27 PM

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That us very complicated .
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, May 12, 2014 5:41:38 PM

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Knowing little about Fermions and Bosons, and never having heard of skyrmions, I can guess.
My guess is similar to that of moniquester.

To be very 'simplistic' about it:

In normal conductors the electrons move through the medium in a very erratic, zig-zag manner, bouncing off other particles, moving only short distances before being stopped.

In a superconductor, there are 'straighter pathways' or 'gaps' which allow the electrons to travel more easily and with very few collisions.

This theory seems to be saying that the (usually relatively small) Bosons in these materials are 'twisted together' in clumps (like the larger Fermions) - allowing the electrons to travel without resistance between them.

That's my idea!
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