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Leaning Tower of Pisa Begins Decade-Long Closure (1990) Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 12:00:00 AM
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Leaning Tower of Pisa Begins Decade-Long Closure (1990)

The Leaning Tower is the freestanding bell tower of a cathedral in Pisa, Italy. Though designed to stand upright, the tower began leaning to the southeast soon after construction began in 1173. In 1964, Italy's government enlisted the aid of a multinational task force to prevent the tower from toppling. After more than 20 years of work, the tower was closed to the public in 1990. It underwent another decade of stabilization efforts before being reopened in 2001. What first caused it to lean? More...
ladydragon91185
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 2:08:41 AM
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Something to do with the waight of the building mats and the fact that it is built on unstable ground, swamp land or something like that. That is my guess..
ladydragon91185
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 2:17:39 AM
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ladydragon91185 wrote:
Something to do with the waight of the building mats and the fact that it is built on unstable ground, swamp land or something like that. That is my guess..
Well I was half right, the ground is unstable, but the weight of the building is not the problem, but the way the foundation was laid is....
sacsayhuaman
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 6:51:47 AM
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The best part of this article to me was that "In an effort to compensate for the tilt, the engineers built higher floors with one side taller than the other". They were pretty sly fellowWhistle
Barbara
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 8:15:19 AM
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When i went to see it, a men told me it was an error of the architects, they built too small fuondations for the height of the constructions
joneseliza09
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 11:20:36 AM
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That is amazing! I never knew why the Tower of Pisa leaned. It was because of subsoil? Not fully developed soil that is able to stand a super heavy tower with seven floors! Amazing, those Pisains are something else.
Christine
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2010 3:26:32 PM
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I like the picture because it looks straight!
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2010 2:31:37 PM
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In the early '80's, my brother and I climbed to the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. We were the only ones there at the time because it was very early in the morning before our tour bus left. We scurried to the top, and only then did we realize that my brother, who was taking the tour photos for both of us, had forgotten to carry his camera with him that morning. Go figure! Nevertheless, images of that experience are etched into my brain.
Drew
Posted: Friday, January 15, 2010 12:04:44 PM
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I find it fascinating that the architectural shortcomings of the tower, which could have made the tower seem like a failure, have become the very aspects that make the tower noteworthy and give it character. Would the tower have become such an icon had it stood straight as originally designed?
RuthP
Posted: Friday, January 15, 2010 12:25:57 PM

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Drew wrote:
I find it fascinating that the architectural shortcomings of the tower, which could have made the tower seem like a failure, have become the very aspects that make the tower noteworthy and give it character. Would the tower have become such an icon had it stood straight as originally designed?

Wow Drew, that is a very good point! I'd have to say "No" to your question.

We have other examples of architecture from this time. The tower is beautiful and would probably have been noted in guide books even without the lean, but I really doubt it would be the icon it is today.

Does anyone here know enough history of architecture or civil engineering to know whether the builders should have known the footings were under-sized at the time?
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