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"adviser" vs "advisor" Options
robichris
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 5:04:39 AM
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Is there a difference? This dictionary, and others, gives them as synonyms but I argue to differ.
In my view, anyone who gives advice is an "adviser", whereas one who is employed to advise is an "advisor".
Having said that, I also argue there should be a second adjective, "advisery" to be used pertaining to general advice delivered and the term "advisory" used in relation to official advice delivered by an advisor, i.e. acting in an advisory position.

What sayest thou, anyone? Is there an advisor or adviser who ventures an opinion?
ninestraycats
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 9:29:01 AM
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Without looking at ANY references, I should say it's a British vs. American spelling. Take it with a grain of salt (or two or three).
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 9:39:45 AM

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Speaking English as a second language, to a Finn advisor seems and sounds good.
sandraleesmith46
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 11:17:27 AM
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This is another one of those "news" to me spelling questions. I've never before seen "adviser" as a legitimate word. I was taught the "-or" spelling across the board, but that was pretty far back in the "dark ages", before color television... It could well have changed since.
ninestraycats
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 11:23:04 AM
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sandraleesmith46 wrote:
This is another one of those "news" to me spelling questions. I've never before seen "adviser" as a legitimate word. I was taught the "-or" spelling across the board, but that was pretty far back in the "dark ages", before color television... It could well have changed since.


Hehe, spell as you please! I learned English in America, but for the past two years I have been spelling "neighbour", "colour," etc. :-) I find "advisor" to be more pleasing to the eye, and I would even go so far to say that "advisor" has a rounder final syllable, such as in the word "or," and "adviser" is more in the middle, such as in the "word" (or rather sound) "errrr..." In the case there is this phonetic difference, I prefer 'advisor' to 'adviser.' I wouldn't under-estimate the power of personal opinion in shaping the way you use language.
Discombobulated
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 5:16:43 PM
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have to agree with ninestraycats on this one. America vs Britain yet again....
deebee
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2010 8:21:45 PM
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As a Pom (English) living in Australia, when really unsure I defer to the Oxford English Dictionary (old habits, you know!). OED states that both spellings are acceptable but that it derives from Old French "aviser" & Latin ad (to) + Videre (see). Thus if literally taken, you would say the -er ending is probably more accurate, but I have to say I prefer the look of the -or ending! Try looking up "mortgager" on the free dictionary & it tells you it is the person who gives a mortgage in return for money to be repaid. It then gives an example "We became mortgagors..." i.e. it uses the alternative ending of -or! I'm sure there are many more examples of such (as an aside the OED only recognises the -or spelling in this instance!).
nitikasnv
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2010 2:35:29 AM
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Hi,

NO there is no difference between adviser and advisor.

Both has same meaning.

ADVISER AND ADVISOR:An expert who gives advice.

Thanks
pedro
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2010 4:48:09 AM
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I'm definitely an 'adviser' person. However a colleague who used to proofread is of the opinion that that is an Americanised spelling and that the 'English' version should be 'advisor'. To confuse matters he is Scottish so I'll stick with the spelling I feel comfortable with.
balzac84
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2010 8:02:52 AM
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Personally, it is none of our business to argue and then
to opt one of two options. We're no lexicographers or
semanticist. Let it be dealt with those whose engagement is
to argue what or how a word could be spelled!
Since, language is not a playground!
Clement
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2010 10:36:36 AM
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ADVISER and ADVISOR mean the same. One is no more British, or American, than the other. A dictionary is only a reference, a guide if you will, to the common usage of words.It doesn't dictate usage. Usage is dictated by the natives of the language.If dictionaries are peremptory dictates of how we use and define words, then the language will eventually lose its evolutionary flow.
Geeman
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2010 2:57:18 PM

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Is this one of the words changed to take the gender out of it? Adviser as a male who gives advice and advisor being neutral regarding the sex of the person giving advice?
nduk23
Posted: Wednesday, May 5, 2010 9:47:30 AM
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ad + visor comes from the latin ad (to, towards) and video (I look). video's principal parts are video, videre, vidi (as in veni, vidi, vici - I came, I saw, I conquered), visum. It is visum that we are interested in here. A Latin noun can be constructed from the fourth principal part, the supine stem, in this case vis-, and the -or suffix will be added to create a noun describing the person doing the action in question, so in this case "visor" (a word that in modern english means something that shields youe eyes, helps you to see), and also "advisor". There are many other examples of nouns being created in this way (vict-or, possess-or, vend-or, terminat-or, instigat-or) as well as related adjectives (amatory, derisory, advisory). So advisor is technically correct, being closer to the Latin, but over the thousands of years since the Romans were using these words, the spelling has changed, sometimes the americans were to blame, sometimes the english (around the time Dr Johnson wrote the first dicionary I would guess many of these words were standardised).

P.S. There are also examples of nouns ceated from the main verb stem, such as pro-vid-er, which comes from the prefix pro- and the main verb stem of video, vid- (see above). I'm not sure whether there is an observable pattern relating to the difference in meaning of nouns derived from the main verb stem or the supine; one might expect words derived from the supine to be more self-regarding, reflexive? I mention this to show that an -or ending is not always closer to the Latin than an -er ending.
linkinsteinblues
Posted: Sunday, May 9, 2010 4:01:41 AM
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before i resorted to a dictionary, i strongly believed that adviser is an american english while advisor is a british english, but since i've checked the dictionary, now i know that the preference of these two spellings are alternate/optional, they have the same meaning. hope this helps.
DarkMoon
Posted: Monday, May 24, 2010 6:37:41 AM

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Personally, I would use 'an adviser', for this is a word I was taught. However, when I looked it up in a dictionary, I found out that 'an advisor' is also rightful and acceptable term to use.
mocha
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2010 8:15:54 AM
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I have question here...

If a man who advise "the other person" is call advisor, what about "the other person" who gets the advise call?Is it advisee?

I hope you get what i mean.
Cat
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2010 10:56:28 AM

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I, too, have found both being equivalent in the dictionary. Even my Webster's from 1975. But in my Harbrace College Handbook, -er is used to indicate "more". Easy to easier or "more easy". I could find nothing for -or however. So my vote is advisor for a person, even though the spell check has noted it as incorrect.
Cat
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2010 7:44:44 PM

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I was at the library today and the reference section had an Oxford dictionary in eleven volumes.

Adviser. Also advisor. Adviser remains the usual spelling, but advisor is freq. used (esp. U.S.) in the titles of persons whose function it is to give advice. 1.a. One who advises or counsels. Also with qualifying word, as legal adviser, tax adviser,etc.

I still like advisor best.
grammargeek
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2010 8:07:42 PM
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Cat wrote:
I was at the library today and the reference section had an Oxford dictionary in eleven volumes.

Adviser. Also advisor. Adviser remains the usual spelling, but advisor is freq. used (esp. U.S.) in the titles of persons whose function it is to give advice. 1.a. One who advises or counsels. Also with qualifying word, as legal adviser, tax adviser,etc.

I still like advisor best.


I do, too, Cat.
RARA
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2010 4:45:00 AM
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mocha wrote:
I have question here...

If a man who advise "the other person" is call advisor, what about "the other person" who gets the advise call?Is it advisee?

I hope you get what i mean.


recipient Anxious
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2010 4:50:58 AM

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mocha wrote:
I have question here...

If a man who advise "the other person" is call advisor, what about "the other person" who gets the advise call?Is it advisee?

I hope you get what i mean.


Advisee is the correct word.
Capricious
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 1:01:24 PM
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robichris wrote:
Is there a difference? This dictionary, and others, gives them as synonyms but I argue to differ.
In my view, anyone who gives advice is an "adviser", whereas one who is employed to advise is an "advisor".


are they pronounced differently as well?
RARA
Posted: Sunday, June 13, 2010 5:03:19 AM
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Yes.

The er and the or at then end of each word affects the pronunciation.
RuthP
Posted: Sunday, June 13, 2010 12:46:33 PM

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Capricious wrote:
robichris wrote:
Is there a difference? This dictionary, and others, gives them as synonyms but I argue to differ.
In my view, anyone who gives advice is an "adviser", whereas one who is employed to advise is an "advisor".


are they pronounced differently as well?

Hmmmm, Think . (American English) If one were speaking formally and paying attention to diction, there would be a minor difference in sound between adviser and advisor. I will state with confidence that in ordinary speech, one would never know which spelling the speaker had in her head.

As far as advice / adviser (my spell-checker doesn't like advisor) the "c" in advice is soft, pronounced like an "s" while the "s" in adviser is pronounced as a "z" - yea for English pronunciation. d'oh!
Capricious
Posted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 5:16:49 AM
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ahan!

thanks RARA and Ruthp :)
krmiller
Posted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 9:52:11 PM
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RARA wrote:
Yes.

The er and the or at then end of each word affects the pronunciation.


Not in my dialect. Both the /e/ and the /o/ reduce to a schwa, or perhaps more accurately, to a syllabic r.

I prefer the spelling "advisor," but that's just what I'm used to seeing. To my surprise, Firefox's spell checker thinks that is wrong and that "adviser" is correct!
RARA
Posted: Wednesday, June 16, 2010 1:25:40 PM
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Must be a UK/US thing as in well spoken British English Advisor and Adviser end in very different ways.
Phil42
Posted: Wednesday, July 6, 2011 6:20:01 AM
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I think you'll find that 'adviser' has a longer history in English. I've always thought 'advisor' arose because of the spelling of 'advisory'.

Phil
pedro
Posted: Wednesday, July 6, 2011 6:28:09 AM
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This has the makings of another dilemna
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, July 6, 2011 7:02:01 AM
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You're right, pedro, certainly a delima.

I think I'll go and have a Budweisor.
Mansoor Nasir
Posted: Thursday, July 7, 2011 2:28:11 PM
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adviser /ədvaɪ.zə r / /-zɚ/ noun also advisor


someone whose job is to give advice about a subject
She is the party's main economic adviser. a financial advisor

Ref: Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary
intelfam
Posted: Thursday, July 7, 2011 6:05:07 PM
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RARA wrote:
Must be a UK/US thing as in well spoken British English Advisor and Adviser end in very different ways.

As a BE speaker I can feel a difference as I say words ending or, but maybe it's how i learned it at me mother's knee. [violins play in minor key]
Yup I roll the "r" for advisor ever so slightly and the "uh" becomes I dunno, slightly more rounded lips. I hope nobody has seen me talking to this mirror...or is it a mirruh?? Pedro where are you?
antonio
Posted: Friday, July 8, 2011 6:06:23 AM
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I think it's just the same.
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