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Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 1:25:38 AM
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Why bother at all, if those are not giants but windmills? Windmills, as I know, don't have malice intentions or craving to kill. Those are giant toys for the grown up yet child.
MechPebbles
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 3:56:26 AM

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I really can't stand Don Quixote. I forced myself to read through the whole book and it's extremely thick. I don't even find it funny, just plain silly. I get enraged everytime I see the title appear in lists of the best books ever written.
Miriam...
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 4:42:22 AM

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To Pebbles: You probably hate [i]The Little Prince[i] as well.
rogermue
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 5:06:49 AM

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Such famous old works of literature open their doors not to everyone. One does not read Don Quichote or Dantes' The Divine Comedy or Shakespeares'
plays as you read a modern crime novel. Introduction by experts is necessary, only then you discover the beauties and the value of such older works of literature. But you may believe the specialists, they are masterworks.
rogermue
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 5:22:44 AM

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Don Quichote illustration
Don Quijote and Sancho Panza, Gustave Doré, 1863.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 6:05:25 AM
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I interpret it this way:

Take care, you ordinary people, those politicians whom you admire so much are not sincere but just hypocritical pretenders.
Ray41
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 7:21:43 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


Was this not where the saying 'tilting at windmills' originated.

Meaning; Attacking imaginary enemies.

Origin;
Tilting at windmills. Tilting is jousting. 'Tilting at windmills' derives from Cervantes' Don Quixote - first published in 1604, under the title The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha. The novel recounts the exploits of would-be knight 'Don Quixote' and his loyal servant Sancho Panza who propose to fight injustice through chivalry. It is considered one of the major literary masterpieces and remains a best seller in numerous translations. In the book, which also gives us the adjective quixotic (striving for visionary ideals), the eponymous hero imagines himself to be fighting giants when he attacks windmills.

Just then they came in sight of thirty or forty windmills that rise from that plain. And no sooner did Don Quixote see them that he said to his squire, "Fortune is guiding our affairs better than we ourselves could have wished. Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them. With their spoils we shall begin to be rich for this is a righteous war and the removal of so foul a brood from off the face of the earth is a service God will bless."

"What giants?" asked Sancho Panza.

"Those you see over there," replied his master, "with their long arms. Some of them have arms well nigh two leagues in length."

"Take care, sir," cried Sancho. "Those over there are not giants but windmills. Those things that seem to be their arms are sails which, when they are whirled around by the wind, turn the millstone."

The figurative reference to tilting at windmills came a little later. John Cleveland published The character of a London diurnall in 1644 (a diurnall was, as you might expect, part-way between a diary or journal):

"The Quixotes of this Age fight with the Wind-mills of their owne Heads."


The full form of the phrase isn't used until towards the end of the 19th century; for example, in The New York Times, April 1870:

"They [Western Republicans] have not thus far had sufficient of an organization behind them to make their opposition to the Committee's bill anything more than tilting at windmills."
curmudgeonine
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 8:51:34 AM

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I tried to read Don Quixote, but failed miserably.
seemo74
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 8:51:58 AM

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i thought he meant that even those who have power and influence get their supremacy from others . for that reason we dont have to be blind and follow them for no reason.
Marguerite
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 9:24:02 AM

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I have yet to read Don Quixote--too busy reading Anna Karenina for the third time.
eddiehotjazz
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 10:04:06 AM
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The way I see it is that Don Quixote read so many books about knights errant and damsels in distress that it addled his brain. I have read it several times and thoroughly enjoy it.
jcbarros
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 11:04:56 AM

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We must be wary of our own perceptions.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 2:26:41 PM

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"...En un lugar de la Mancha de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no ha mucho tiempo que vivía un hidalgo de los de lanza en astillero,
adarga antigua, rocín flaco y galgo corredor.
Una olla de algo más vaca que carnero, salpicón las más noches,
duelos y quebrantos los sábados, lentejas los viernes,
algún palomino de añadidura los domingos, consumían las tres partes de su hacienda.
El resto della concluían sayo de velarte, calzas de velludo para las fiestas,
con sus pantuflos de lo mesmo, y los días de entresemana se honraba
con su vellori de lo más fino..."
((Somewhere in La Mancha, in a place whose name I do not care to remember, a gentleman lived not long ago, one of those who has a lance and ancient shield on a shelf and keeps a skinny nag and a greyhound for racing.....)
(MIGUEL DE CERVANTES SAAVEDRA. El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha. Cáp. I.)

Cervantes wrote his work in a form of Old Castilian, the medieval form of the Spanish language. The language of Don Quixote, although still containing archaisms, is far more understandable to modern Spanish readers than is, for instance, the completely medieval Spanish of the Poema de mio Cid, a kind of Spanish that is as different from Cervantes's language as Middle English is from Modern English. The Old Castilian language was also used to show the higher class that came with being a knight errant.
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 5:11:06 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


Sancho Panza's warning unheeded, Don Quixote charged at the closest windmill thinking it was a giant, only to be thrown off his horse with a shattered
lance. His answer to Panza's reproach for not listening put a nice twist to Don Quixote's delusion, not unlike other delusions, having the capability to re-invent itself:

""Hush, friend Sancho," replied Don Quixote, "the fortunes of war more
than any other are liable to frequent fluctuations; and moreover I think,
and it is the truth, that that same sage Friston who carried off my study
and books, has turned these giants into mills in order to rob me of the
glory of vanquishing them, such is the enmity he bears me; but in the end
his wicked arts will avail but little against my good sword.""

Isn't that the cleverest explanation for the perpetual "knight errantry" of our own war-hungry Dons, tilting at everything in sight?
Haz
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 5:36:52 PM

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These stories never really attracted me to even try and read them. Maybe one day!
capitán
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 5:39:02 PM

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Location: San Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador
Daemon wrote:
Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)

---

Mire vuestra merced,
respondió Sancho,
que aquellos que allí se parecen no son gigantes,
sino molinos de viento...


---


I do think so, Verbatim.
Your participation helps the ones who haven't read the book yet.

The reading of chilvary books fed his fairytale mind everyday.
Madness took him. Fantastic tales of chivalry were his life, and he certainly lived between such lines.
"As you think, you shall become" right? A knightly life was calling; he did what he believed.
After all, how many people do you know that actually live their dreams and go out to reach them?
In madness, he was truly living, unlike so many myriads of people that I know.

Yes, they took away his books and had a momentary lapse of reason.
But a knight he was, an errant knight by right of passion and commitment.
How could he throw it away for the life of a common man in a town!

Then you have to ask yourself: wasn't he a knight?
What was him without his tales and monsters?
That was his life, and when a man is being robbed of his life...what kind of man he becomes?
Madness was his christ, salvation and heaven.

We all have our fairytales,
whether they be christianity,
our philosophy, our passions,
our mistakes.

philânderos
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 9:57:05 PM

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It takes us, Spanish speaking people, more than one reading to get the gist of Don Quixote. But it is a treat because it is a funny and insightful book.
2015Febechukwu E105
Posted: Sunday, April 6, 2014 10:15:07 PM

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Don Quixote was an idealist idit(thats how I saw idiot).
MechPebbles
Posted: Monday, April 7, 2014 4:39:27 AM

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rogermue wrote:
Such famous old works of literature open their doors not to everyone. One does not read Don Quichote or Dantes' The Divine Comedy or Shakespeares'
plays as you read a modern crime novel. Introduction by experts is necessary, only then you discover the beauties and the value of such older works of literature. But you may believe the specialists, they are masterworks.


A person who doesn't like Don Quixote isn't necessarily the type who can only enjoy fluff. My favourite books of fiction are Middlemarch and those written by Dostoevsky precisely because they are antithetical to the fluffy Don Quixote, where life is not depicted by lighthearted prancing but painted in dark severity.
MechPebbles
Posted: Monday, April 7, 2014 4:53:22 AM

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Miriam... wrote:
To Pebbles: You probably hate [i]The Little Prince[i] as well.


I've not read it but it's the type I avoid. I like literary realism. Have you read Stendhal's The Red and the Black? That's more my kind of a book. Books like Middlemarch, The Idiot, Crime and Punishment and A Raw Youth have an impact on me I won't even try to describe.
MechPebbles
Posted: Monday, April 7, 2014 5:20:29 AM

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curmudgeonine wrote:
I tried to read Don Quixote, but failed miserably.


I highly commend your "failure". I forced myself to read the book in its entirety and what did I get? Well, I was going to say nothing in the least but I actually did get something. I realise now the importance of finding our niche in the wide literary world.

There is this character in the TV series Lost, a Scots I believe, who carried a Dickens novel with him everywhere he went. He explained that he loved the works of Dickens so much that he had saved the one last Dickens novel which he had not read so as to savour the thought of reading it one day. This scene really sticks out in my mind. When I saw it, I really envied the man for finding an author he could love so much.

I believe I have found this author for myself. It's Dostoevsky. Even though I am only reading my fourth Dostoevsky and have quite some way to go before I reach the final book, I am already beginning to dread that day.

So what I'm saying is we should all look for the kind of books we really will love. Don't let these "failures" bother us for they only point us in the right direction.
kenturner1
Posted: Wednesday, April 9, 2014 8:36:43 PM

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Wow. You all have just told me I need to read more.
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, April 11, 2014 4:09:38 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


Don Quixote, in love with Dulcinea,
Tilted at windmills, for the lack of giants...

That's all that matters, that they even dared,
Standing with long arms, as if I really cared
That they were but sails of the windmills...
No cost is ever too high, nor must be spared.
Take care Sancho Panza, you seem to be scared!
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