mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Max Ernst (1891) Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 33,204
Neurons: 98,790
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Max Ernst (1891)

Having served in World War I, German-born French painter and sculptor Max Ernst at first gravitated toward the Dada movement, but the former student of psychology and philosophy eventually became one of the founders of surrealism. Apart from the medium of collage, for which he is well known, Ernst developed other devices to express his fantastic vision, like frottage, in which a drawing tool is rubbed over paper laid on a textured surface, and grattage, a technique consisting of what? More...
pedro
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 3:59:50 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
One of my all time favourites, and what could be more surrealistic than dying on April Fools Day (just before what would have been his birthday!)

http://www.abcgallery.com/E/ernst/ernst-4.html
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 7:41:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,578
Neurons: 7,191,559
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision.

Salvador Dali


monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 8:08:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,578
Neurons: 7,191,559
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Surrealism is not a school of poetry but a movement of liberation ... A way of rediscovering the language of innocence, a renewal of the primordial pact, poetry is the basic text, the foundation of the human order. Surrealism is revolutionary because it is a return to the beginning of all beginnings.

OCTAVIO PAZ, Alternating Current
Haz
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 8:38:36 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/3/2014
Posts: 194
Neurons: 34,034
Location: Liverpool, England, United Kingdom
In frottage the artist takes a pencil or other drawing tool and makes a rubbing over a textured surface. The drawing can be left as it is or used as the basis for further refinement. While superficially similar to brass rubbing and other forms of rubbing intended to reproduce an existing subject, and in fact sometimes being used as an alternate term for it, frottage differs in being aleatoric and random in nature.

It was developed by Ernst in 1925. Ernst was inspired by an ancient wooden floor where the grain of the planks had been accentuated by many years of scrubbing. The patterns of the graining suggested strange images to him. He captured these by laying sheets of paper on the floor and then rubbing over them with a soft pencil.
curmudgeonine
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 9:02:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/23/2011
Posts: 567
Neurons: 170,308
Location: Orillia, Ontario, Canada
Constantly experimenting, in 1925 Ernst invented a graphic art technique called frottage (see Surrealist techniques), which uses pencil rubbings of objects as a source of images. He also created the 'grattage' technique, in which paint is scraped across canvas to reveal the imprints of the objects placed beneath. He uses this technique in his famous painting Forest and Dove (as shown at the Tate Modern).
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 11:10:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/4/2013
Posts: 33,125
Neurons: 1,416,198
Location: Palm Springs, California, United States
I really enjoyed reading about this artist.

I was especially intrigued by the link "Surrealist techniques," and then reading the quote that was posted by monamagda, "...rediscovering the language of innocence, a renewal of the primordial pact..." one can see that those techniques are a lot like a child's innocent experimentation with art.

I can see the potential for me to do some experimenting, myself. I don't have a lot to spend on supplies, so I always have an eye out for items that can be "re-purposed" into artwork. This should be fun!
Marguerite
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 1:13:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/26/2010
Posts: 538
Neurons: 23,973
Location: Hebron, Connecticut, United States
Did the Nazi arrest Max Ernst for his art? He was a Catholic and served in the first war and a Ayran German so why? I don't understand why he was arrested.
On a different note, I wonder what it is like to marry so many women? Leaving behind his wife and son,Ernst entered France illegally and settled into a ménage à trois with Éluard and his wife Gala in Paris suburb Saint-Brice. I can understand Paul Éluard's breaking free from the ménage à trois. I would imagine a woman would develop a preference for one man above the other.
kenturner1
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 7:00:35 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/26/2014
Posts: 309
Neurons: 11,475
Location: Steubenville, Ohio, United States
His artwork is nice and Dorthea Tanning seemed like an interesting artist as well.
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Thursday, April 3, 2014 10:36:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/4/2013
Posts: 33,125
Neurons: 1,416,198
Location: Palm Springs, California, United States
kenturner, I didn't even think to look at Tanning's work. It's quite captivating. Thanks for the tip!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.