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Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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scurry

(verb) To move about or proceed hurriedly.

Synonyms: scamper, scuttle, skitter

Usage: Once we heard thunder and saw lightning, we scurried from the beach and sprinted back to the house.
kenturner1
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 12:51:05 AM

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Good word!
rogermue
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 1:12:28 AM

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I would guess that to scurry is a variant of to hurry, probably Latin prefix ex- that might have been used for "extremely" and been reduced
to s-.
mangezi
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 1:44:25 AM

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we all scurried for cover when Oscar Pistorius fired a shot into the clubhouse ceiling.
curmudgeonine
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 9:11:39 AM

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Using the word 'scurry' somehow seems to be suggesting furtive movements to me.
adele T
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 9:15:17 AM
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to move in a hurry, scuttle
Sree113
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 1:12:31 PM

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Learned a new word today
Westley Payne
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:27:28 PM

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Boo hoo!
Marguerite
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 5:15:21 PM

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I scurry into my bed and hide under the covers everytime I miss a deadline.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 6:10:42 PM

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rogermue wrote:
I would guess that to scurry is a variant of to hurry, probably Latin prefix ex- that might have been used for "extremely" and been reduced
to s-.


I don't think it is anything so refined. Just a bit of rhyming repeat. (whatever the word for that is. I am sure someone mentioned what it is called on a thread on helter-skelter, harum-scarum etc, some time ago. Hmmm, what is it with that pattern? Think

Quote:
scurry (v.)
1810, perhaps from hurry-scurry (1732), a reduplication of hurry (v.). As a noun, 1823, from the verb.


and, in ridiculously circular reference...

Quote:
hurry-scurry
1732, probably a reduplication of hurry formed with awareness of scurry.


Although the alliteration with scuttle, scamper and skittle may not be coincidental in how the meaning has evolved into the modern understanding of it - complete with small mouse-sized feet - at least in my visualisation of it.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 10:13:00 PM
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Descending into a hideous darkness of dank and mold we heard the hurried scurry of that domain's rodent masters.
rogermue
Posted: Thursday, March 27, 2014 1:09:58 AM

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Reading thar's post I think it is possible that to scurry is such a variant as he says.
Another possibility might be Latin dis-curr-ere which I now remember. discurrere means to run away in all directions
and dis- may have been reduced to s-.

I think a typical sentence would be: When the cat appeared the mice scurried off into their holes.
Wendy Huang
Posted: Thursday, March 27, 2014 5:33:15 AM

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<After seeing blood, I scurried to restroom to vomit badly>... Is it right?
108amitabha
Posted: Thursday, March 27, 2014 12:50:57 PM

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Yes, it is fine.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Thursday, March 27, 2014 9:18:53 PM
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rogermue wrote:
Reading thar's post I think it is possible that to scurry is such a variant as he says.
Another possibility might be Latin dis-curr-ere which I now remember. discurrere means to run away in all directions
and dis- may have been reduced to s-.

I think a typical sentence would be: When the cat appeared the mice scurried off into their holes.



A worthy etymological interlude Roger. Thank you for distinguishing between the typical "cat appeared" sentence and the non typical "dank, moldy, domain" sentence.

And now I must away to send the children scurrying off to their bedtime ritual.
Barely literate
Posted: Wednesday, April 2, 2014 1:46:12 PM

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Daemon wrote:
scurry

(verb) To move about or proceed hurriedly.

scamper, scuttle, skitter

Once we heard thunder and saw lightning, we scurried from the beach and sprinted back to the house.


If the meaning of the word "scurry" is "To move about or proceed hurriedly", why should we again use the word "sprint back" in the example sentence?
Why can't it be like....
Once we heard thunder and saw lightning, we scurried from the beach and sprinted back to the house.

Barely literate
Posted: Thursday, April 3, 2014 10:44:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/29/2012
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salesh2010 wrote:
Daemon wrote:
scurry

(verb) To move about or proceed hurriedly.

scamper, scuttle, skitter

Once we heard thunder and saw lightning, we scurried from the beach and sprinted back to the house.


If the meaning of the word "scurry" is "To move about or proceed hurriedly", why should we again use the word "sprint back" in the example sentence?
Why can't it be like....
Once we heard thunder and saw lightning, we scurried from the beach and sprinted back to the house.

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